Archive for the "Religious" Category

Kids’ math Activities for Shavuot

The Jewish holiday Shavuot celebrates the giving of the Torah and the first grain harvest of the new year. The festival falls 50 days after Passover, and the period in between (from the second night of Passover to Shavuot) is known as the omer. Counting down the 49 days from the second night of Passover to Shavuot is a fun way to involve your child in the holiday. It’s also an easy way to sneak in a few math lessons while helping your little learner to better understand Shavuot. Check out these kid-friendly ways to count down from Passover to...

Shavuot Activities for Kids: Bread, Books and More

The Jewish holiday Shavuot combines the early summer grain harvest and the giving of the Torah at Mt. Sinai. While there might not be eight nights of presents (like you’d find during Hanukkah), there are plenty of ways to involve the kids in the holiday celebration. What can you do to help your young child learn about Shavuot? Check out these easy kid-friendly activity ideas! Bake Bread As a festival dedicated, in part, to the grain harvest, take this time to bake a few loaves of bread. Make a challah or another type of bread — as you discuss grain,...

What’s In an Orthodox Easter Basket?

Unlike the chocolate bunny, marshmallow chickee-filled basket that’s decorated with plastic grass and candy-colored eggs, the Ukrainian Orthodox Easter basket isn’t filled entirely with sweets. But that doesn’t mean it can’t come with plenty of treats — just not of the cream-centered egg variety. What goes into an Ukrainian Orthodox Easter basket? Check out some of the common items that you’d find. Pysanky and Eggs Instead of those candy or plastic (candy-filled) eggs you might think of when you hear the words “Easter basket,” the Ukrainian version includes pysanky. These are decorated eggs that are made by using a wax...

Passover Art for Kids with Matzah

You make a gingerbread house during Christmas. So why not make a matzah house for Passover? Celebrate the Jewish holiday with this fun kids’ food craft. Along with an actual mini house, the kiddos can also try some of these other artsy matzah ideas. Oh, and the best part is — the family can eat the finished product! Matzah House Use sheets of matzah in the same way that you’d use gingerbread to construct a house with four walls and a sloped roof. Instead of frosting, smooth on jelly or peanut butter as the mortar that holds the construction together....

Easter Egg Art Alternatives

Celebrating Easter by coloring eggs is a tradition that you’ve always enjoyed. But this year you’re looking for a few fun Easter egg alternatives. Even tough you still plan on making plenty of the dip and dye eggs, the kids are also asking for other artsy ideas. Check out these options that are completely crafty — and fun for all ages! Felt Eggs Cut craft felt sheets into ovals. Make as many ovals, in as many sizes, as your child wants. Each oval is one egg. Your child has a few décor options to dress-up the eggs. They can cut...

Matzah Bark Recipe for Passover

Turn the tradition of eating matzah during Passover up a notch and turn the unleveled bread into dessert! How can you make matzah into a tasty sweet treat? This chocolate bark recipe is sweet, somewhat savory and fun for the family to make together. Create memories as you make matzah bark with the kids this year, next year and for years to come. Try the recipe as is or add your own special family flavor to it by mixing in chopped nuts, sprinkles, white chocolate morsels, peanut butter or anything else your kids want. Ingredients Dark chocolate Matzah How-To Steps...

Easter Candy Recipes for the Whole Family

You fill your child’s Easter basket with candy. But what happens when there are leftovers? While the kiddos would gladly eat all the sugary goodness, you’d prefer that they didn’t lay waste to it right away. Save some of that Easter candy and turn it into delicious desserts — that the whole family can help to make. Easter Peeps Sundae A scoop of ice cream, a circle of whipped cream and a few Easter Peeps can make for the perfect Sunday sundae. Before spooning the ice cream into a bowl, chop up a few Peeps into small-sized bits. Make sure...

Creative DIY Easter Wreath Crafts for the Family

Decorating your home for Easter doesn’t have to mean buying everything ready-made from a store. You, and your family, can DIY cute holiday crafts to display during Easter-time. These easy wreath art activities are perfect ways to accent your holiday décor. For each wreath, start with a carboard donut shape. Reuse and old box, drawing a circle on the don’t. Draw a smaller circle inside of it and cut the entire shape out. Now you have a base to build the rest of your Easter wreath on. Faux Flowers Cut or tear pieces of colorful tissue paper into square shapes....

Passover Matzah Recipes By the Meal

Matzah is a staple of the Passover Seder. Even though you might swap the unleavened bread for the yeast-raised stuff during this Jewish holiday, you don’t need to make this cracker-like snack plain. What can you do to dress up matzah? Take a look at these easy, and kid-friendly, ideas to transform matzah into something magical — by the meal. Breakfast Granola Instead of the typical granola your kiddo crunches on, try using matzah. Crunch the matzah into granola-sized pieces. Add raisins, shopped dates, shredded coconut or anything else your child enjoys eating to the mix. Serve it as is...

Passover Seder Plate Crafts for Kids

The Passover holiday is a time to celebrate. Along with the Seder meal, you can create crafts with your child to help them better understand this Jewish holiday. As you prep for Passover, try one (or all) of these Seder-themed kids’ art activities. Felt Plates Your crafty kid can construct their own felt playset with a Passover Seder theme. Cut plates for 8x10-inch pieces of craft felt (your child can cut out circles). Next, cut out different colors of felt to make the items for each plate. This includes matzah, eggs, a shankbone, charoset, karpas vegetables and bitter herbs. Your...