1804 Giovanni Rosini For Lucignano: Rhymes The Painter Aretino Pietro Welcome


1804 Giovanni Rosini For Lucignano: Rhymes The Painter Aretino Pietro Welcome

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1804 Giovanni Rosini For Lucignano: Rhymes The Painter Aretino Pietro Welcome:
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GIOVANNI ROSINI: "TO THE GREAT PAINTER PIETRO WELCOME PEL HIS TITLE IN TUSCANY. ODE OF GIO. ROSINI ". Without editorial data, (1804). In 16 ° (cm. 17 x 11.5), pages VII. Bound but without paperback.
Rare.

Pietro Benvenuti (Arezzo, January 8, 1769 - Florence, February 3, 1844) was a painter of neoclassical academic style, active between the second half of the eighteenth century and the first half of the nineteenth century. In 1781 he studied painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Florence, then moved to Rome where he studied from 1792 to 1803. From the early years, he was a friend of Vincenzo Camuccini, and together with him and Luigi Sabatelli he opened an atelier in Rome. Stylistically it was influenced by the great French painter Jacques-Louis David.

He returned to work in Arezzo and in 1807 he was called as court painter by Elisa Bonaparte Baciocchi and became director of the Academy of Florence. Together with a group of collaborators and students, Benvenuti was commissioned to decorate the new rooms of Palazzo Pitti in 1811-1812, including the Salone di Ercole.

The Restoration did not bring about a decline in his career and the new Grand Duke Leopold II of Tuscany entrusted him with the task of frescoing the vault of the Medici Chapel of the Basilica of San Lorenzo, which he painted with eight large subjects from the Old and New Testaments, the four Prophets and the four Evangelists.

He died shortly after leaving his post at the Academy. His most notable pupils were: Giuseppe Gandolfo, Stefano Ussi, Cesare Mussini, Antonio Ciseri, Francesco Mensi, Nicola Cianfanelli, Adeodato Malatesta, Giuseppe Bezzuoli and Francesco Nenci.

ROSINI, John. - He was born on June 24, 1776 in Lucignano in Val di Chiana, in the Aretino, from Bartolommeo, graduated in medicine, and from Maria Torelli.

For reasons related to the profession of his father, an official of the Grand Ducal bureaucracy, the family settled in Livorno a few months after his birth. Here the young Rosini made his first studies of Latin and rhetoric under learned ecclesiastical tutors. With the further transfer of Bartolommeo, appointed ten years later as royal vicar of Ponte a Sieve, he was enrolled in the seminary schools of Fiesole, attended until 1791; in 1792 he was started to study philosophy in the Benedictine abbey of Florence, under the guidance of a Cassinese monk, and in the meantime he began to attend the University in Pisa. In 1796 he obtained the title of doctor in utroque iure with the intention of pursuing, in his father's footsteps, a career in Grand-ducal administration. In the meantime, he had begun to write his first poetic compositions, published between 1794 and 1799 and consisting mainly of occasional hatreds and poetic jokes of strong arcadian intonation. The appreciation they encountered in men of letters such as Lorenzo Pignotti and Monsignor Angelo Fabroni, then administrator of the University, therefore pushed him to definitively privilege the passion for human letters.

In addition to seeking the protection of wealthy patrons such as the patrician Lucchese Cristoforo Boccella, to pursue this vocation, he launched from 1798 in a multiform activity of publisher and printer, trusting in the nascent letter market. Thanks to the sale by Fabroni of its domestic printing house, originally created for the publication of the Newspaper of the literati, was preparing for his first important undertaking, namely the care of the complete edition of the Works by Melchiorre Cesarotti. But the excited political events of 1799 stopped the initiative and more generally the commercial prosperity of the new business.

Although sentimentally tied to the Lorraine past, Rosini, strengthened by his ambition, realistically adapted to the changed political scenario, trusting in the fact that the possibility of personal fulfillment would not be lacking even under new power. Alternating at the same time the activity of private teacher and that of literary, he therefore quickly resumed his work for the typographical activity, and with the opening of the new century he reorganized it with important investments, providing it with the beautiful characters of Didot, entrusting a large part of it of the administration to a new partner, Niccolò Capurro, and making use of the collaboration of qualified workers. So he printed the editions with refined illustrations, entrusted to engravers such as Carlo Lasinio, as in the case of the Pictorial letters on the Campo Santo of Pisa (Pisa 1810) or his History of Italian painting, conceived in 1813 during a Parisian visit to the Louvre, but which for the complexity required would have seen the release of the first volumes only starting from 1839. In 1804, thanks to the decisive support of Pignotti, he had been appointed by Maria Luisa di borbone to the new chair of Italian eloquence of the University of Pisa. In his first prolusion, from 1806 (Of the need to write in your own language, Pisa 1808), illustrated the "reasons why Italians are obliged to keep their language clear of any foreign corruption" (Ferrucci, 1856, p. 12).

In the context of the Bourbon and conservative interlude of the Kingdom of Etruria, to whose sovereigns he had readily dedicated two poems of commendable tone (The sciences and the arts, Pisa 1801; The century of Leo X, Pisa 1803), the prayer was part of the controversy on the question of language and intended to represent a criticism of Napoleon, but above all he expressed his adherence to tendentially purist and markedly classicist positions to which he would dedicate his entire academic and literary career.

This adhesion believed to testify also with private choices such as that of attributing to the son, born in those years from the marriage to Geltrude Gotti (married after the first wife Anna Becciani of Florence), the name of Ippolito in honor of Pindemonte, and that of ensuring to the second daughter Teresa a godfather like Vincenzo Monti.

The political framework changed again, with another prolusion, held in 1809 in the presence of the Grand Duchess Elisa Baciocchi, in which he expressed a strong appreciation for the signs favorable to a re-foundation on an autonomous basis of the Accademia della Crusca, Rosini reiterated the principle without hesitation the necessary consensus between power and intellectuals. Although he did not fail to promote autonomous cultural activities, also by investing his own capital, in homage to a similar conception of courtly-born culture, which identified in the royal command an irreplaceable protection of letters and the arts, in 1814 he praised the definitive Lorraine Restoration with the poem The race of Homer and Hesiod (Pisa 1814).

Formed under the first phase of the reign of Ferdinand III of Lorraine, in a climate of declining enlightenment and regionalistic retreat, he remained forever tied to the late eighteenth century of those years and to a Leopold myth reinterpreted in a highly municipal key and consolidated in a a vision that between revolution and reaction stood on a cautiously enlightened despotism. With this position he would also face the problems of the new century in which he was called to spend a long part of his life.

With the jurist Giovanni Carmignani, a symbol figure with him of the University and the Pisan culture of the Restoration, Rosini animated and directed the New Literary Journal, late continuation of the eighteenth-century one of Fabroni. In Tuscany at the time, this erudite organ, directly financed by the government, represented the alternative toAnthology Florentine by Giovan Pietro Vieusseux and came to host with such frequency reviews and writings of the Pisan scholar that Giuseppe Montanelli in the mid-thirties came to call it "Rosini's spittoon" (Manfredi, 2016, p. 183). In the meantime, with commitment and mixed fortunes, he had continued to retain, despite changing names and members, the ownership and management of the printing house, with the resumption and completion, by 1813, of Cesarotti's works, with the republication of several Italian classics, and favoring between 1815 and the 1920s necklaces of contemporary neoclassical poets, critical editions of classics such as the History of Italy by Francesco Guicciardini or the entire work of Torquato Tasso in over thirty volumes.

Arcade and praiseworthy literate, easy to the pedantic literary controversy, however, Rosini was not entirely projected in the past, not failing to participate in processes of organization of modern culture. Not insensitive to the emergence of an audience of readers, it was one of the greatest examples of how much the culture of the Restoration that he embodied was not without the ability to use dissemination tools typical of the nineteenth-century bourgeois culture and the new market of letters to convey and to pass traditional content.

In this sense, he even decided to compare himself, also for reasons of economic convenience, with the nineteenth-century genre par excellence, the novel. Precisely his passion for an editorial activity capable of touching many cities, even more than the intense social socialization and enrollment in the most diverse academies, contributed to putting him at the center of a vast network of relationships with the Italian culture of the time , and pushed him to take charge of the writing for it, from the late 1920s, of historical novels which, due to public success, made him second only to Alessandro Manzoni. The Nun of Monza. History of the 17th century (Pisa 1829), which came out to exploit the long wave of Manzoni's best seller, taking up one of its figures, experienced twenty-five editions in just over twenty years and various foreign translations.

His novels, however, were only a different way through which to mediate his deep-rooted convictions, demonstrating how much his publisher empiricism clashed with insurmountable cultural and ideal mortgages. Beyond the apparent ambiguity of the choice, they revealed themselves "as another possible dimension taken by its literary space" (Cordié, 1981, p. 536); devoid of any form of moral and intellectual pedagogy, or civil and romantic thrill, but imbued only with that idyllic escape typical of arcade literature, they were an opportunity to re-propose in another form themes and Environments already widely present in his erudite research of art history, in hatred and poems.

If during the central years of the Restoration, with his multifaceted activity, Rosini established himself as an absolutely central character in Grand Ducal Tuscany, in the early 1940s the suspension of funding for the Pisan newspaper and the university reform of the administrator Gaetano Giorgini instead favored a partial marginalization of old rhetoricians and their culture. Rosini then increased the polemical tirades against his own century, accompanied by melancholy references for that Arcadia which, with its lounges and academies, had been Tuscany in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. With the advent of 1848 the Grand Duke appointed him senator, but the elderly professor continued to harbor never dormant diffidence towards constitutional and representative solutions, and during the second Restoration aimed to accentuate the nostalgia for the ancient times, of which it was pervaded in deep one of his last labors (Elements of contemporary history, Pisa 1851), as part of a further tightening of its closures. Strengthening positions expressed in the dedication affixed to one of his three historical novels (Luisa Strozzi. History of the XVI century, Pisa 1833), in which he had come to affirm the all-Italian origin of this literary genre, in an immoderate surge of pride he pushed himself to claim that he had never been an imitator of anyone for his novels and to claim a sort of personal primacy over Walter Scott and even Manzoni himself (Letter to the famous Mr. De Lamartine, in The Tuscan monitor, December 2, 1854).

He died in Pisa on May 16, 1855.

(Source: Treccani.it)

GIOVANNI ROSINI: "TO THE GREAT PAINTER PIETRO WELCOME PEL HIS TITLE IN TUSCANY. ODE OF GIO. ROSINI ". Without editorial data, (1804). In 16 ° (cm. 17 x 11.5), pages VII. Bound but without paperback. Rare. He returned to work in Arezzo and in 1807 he was called as court painter by Elisa Bonaparte Baciocchi and became director of the Academy of Florence. Together with a group of collaborators and students, Benvenuti was commissioned to decorate the new rooms of Palazzo Pitti in 1811-1812, including the Salone di Ercole. He died shortly after leaving his post at the Academy. His most notable pupils were: Giuseppe Gandolfo, Stefano Ussi, Cesare Mussini, Antonio Ciseri, Francesco Mensi, Nicola Cianfanelli, Adeodato Malatesta, Giuseppe Bezzuoli and Francesco Nenci.

1804 Giovanni Rosini For Lucignano: Rhymes The Painter Aretino Pietro Welcome:
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