Holidays.net Online Store

Holdays.net Home


July 27th, 2014
Parents' Day

July 28th, 2014
World Hepatitis Day

July 29th, 2014
Eid-al-Fitr

July 30th, 2014
World Friendship Day

August 5th, 2014
Tisha B'Av

August 9th, 2014
World Indigenous Peoples’ Day

August 11th, 2014
Victory Day

August 12th, 2014
International Youth Day

August 15th, 2014
Statehood Day in Hawaii

August 15th, 2014
Assumption of Mary

August 15th, 2014
'Bennington Battle Day' observed

August 16th, 2014
Bennington Battle Day

August 19th, 2014
National Aviation Day

August 19th, 2014
World Humanitarian Day

August 23rd, 2014
World Day for Slave Trade Abolition

August 27th, 2014
Lyndon Baines Johnson Day

 



Search:

1853 Ottoman Empire Turkey Egypt Morocco Navigation Naval Medal Silver Rare For Sale

1853 Ottoman Empire Turkey Egypt Morocco Navigation Naval Medal Silver Rare

OTTOMANEMPIRE TURKEY EGYPT MISR MISIR MOROCCO
1853 OTTOMAN EMPIRE EGYPT MOROCCO NAVIGATION SUPERB SILVER MEDAL.... RARE RARE !!!
COMPAGNIE GENERALE DE NAVIGATION A HELICHE.Rev.: LIGNES DU MAROC D'EGYPTE ET DE TURQUIE.39mm -19.63g

In the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, sea power played a central role in the expansion of the Ottoman Empire, and Ottoman fleets operated on the high seas in the Atlantic, the Mediterranean, and east into the Indian Ocean. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Ottoman navy was generally neglected and its effectiveness declined, but it was revived at times during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The decline of the navy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was largely due to the new geostrategic realities, whereby the main challenges to the empire no longer came from the naval powers of Spain, Portugal, and Venice, but from the land powers of Austria, Poland, Russia, and Persia (now Iran).

The origins of the modern Ottoman navy can be traced to the Russian-Ottoman Wars of 1768 - 1774. A Russian fleet based in the Baltic circled the European continent and destroyed the Ottoman fleet at Cheshme (July 1770). This led to a massive effort to rejuvenate the navy. During the reigns of Abdülhamit I (1774 - 1789) and Selim III (1789 - 1807), scores of modern warships were constructed under the supervision of European ship-wrights. The Naval Engineering School (Tersane Mühendishanesi) was founded (1776), and the navy's command structure was modernized and placed under the supervision of the newly established Ministry of the Navy (1805). At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the navy was once again a formidable, though largely untested, force. In 1806, it listed 27 ships of the line and 27 frigates, as well as smaller vessels, armed with 2,156 guns and manned by some 40,000 sailors and marines.

After the fall of Selim III (1807), the navy was again neglected, and its strength declined. During the Greek War of Independence (1821 - 1830), it suffered many losses at the hands of the Greeks. The heaviest single blow, however, came on 20 October 1827, when a combined British-French-Russian fleet destroyed the Ottoman-Egyptian fleet inside the harbor of Navarino (now in Greece). The Ottomans alone lost thirty-seven vessels and thousands of sailors. It took the navy more than a decade to recover from the disaster at Navarino. By 1838, it had fifteen ships of the line and an equal number of frigates, as well as smaller vessels.

As of 1838, there was growing cooperation between the Ottoman and British navies: Ottoman and British squadrons conducted joint maneuvers; the navy was reorganized on British lines; Ottoman officers were sent to Britain for training; and British naval officers and engineers arrived in Constantinople (now Istanbul), the Ottoman capital, to serve as advisers from time to time.

In July 1839, the Ottoman grand admiral, Ahmet Fevzi Pasha, suddenly sailed the entire fleet to Alexandria and surrendered it to Egypt's ruler, Muhammad Ali, who was trying to become independent from the empire. This extraordinary act was the result of a power struggle within the Ottoman government following the death of Mahmud II. The fleet was returned in the following year as part of a general settlement of Ottoman-Egyptian relations, giving Egypt its autonomy.

During the Tanzimat (reform) era (1839 - 1876) in the empire, considerable resources were directed toward the further development and modernization of the navy, and sailing vessels were replaced with steamships. On the eve of the Crimean War (1853 - 1856), the Ottoman navy had 10 ships of the line and 14 frigates, as well as smaller vessels, with a total of 2,080 guns and a staff of more than 20,000 men. On 30 November 1853, Russia's Black Sea squadron, using new shell-firing guns, destroyed an Ottoman wooden fleet at Sinop. This had important political consequences, since it enraged British public opinion against Russia, leading to the Crimean War. It also marked an important milestone in naval history, resulting everywhere in the construction of iron-clad warships. The Ottoman navy also replaced most of its main wooden warships with iron-clads. By 1877, it had thirteen iron-clad frigates in addition to three wooden frigates, four corvettes, and various smaller craft.

During the reign of Abdülhamit II (1876 - 1909), priority was given to the development of the army, while the navy, because of financial constraints, was neglected, leading to its decline. In 1912, the navy listed four battleships, two cruisers, eight destroyers, three corvettes, and smaller craft. During the Balkan Wars (1912/13), it was outclassed by the Greek navy, which dominated the Aegean Sea.

Following the Balkan Wars, the Ottoman government, led by the Young Turks, placed great emphasis on modernizing and strengthening the navy. A British naval mission led by the Admiral Arthur H. Limpus helped reorganize the navy and its various departments. The navy was to be greatly strengthened by two modern battleships ordered from Britain whose delivery was expected in August 1914. On 3 August, however, the British government announced that with the impending European crisis (that very soon became World War I), the ships would not be delivered. On 11 August, the Ottoman government permitted two powerful German cruisers, Goeben and Breslau, to enter the Dardanelles; they subsequently announced their purchase by the Ottoman navy as replacement for the British-built warships. The cruisers were given Turkish names, but they remained under the command of their German crews. On 29 October, Ottoman warships, including the two former German cruisers, suddenly attacked Russian ports in the Black Sea, marking the entry of the Ottoman Empire into the war.


PLEASE LOOK AT THE PICTURES FOR THE CONDITION

INTERNATIONAL buyers ARE WELCOME WE SHIP WORLDWIDE!!!!!

IF YOU BUY MORE THAN ONE LOT - WE WILL COMBINE THE LOTS -NO EXTRA SHIPPING COST

GOOD LUCK offerDING!!!


1853 Ottoman Empire Turkey Egypt Morocco Navigation Naval Medal Silver Rare

This item has been shown 372 times.

Buy Now

1853 Ottoman Empire Turkey Egypt Morocco Navigation Naval Medal Silver Rare:
$1,026




Antique
Antique "bethlehem Pennsylvania" Medal Ribbon Pin-whitehead & Hoag-incorporated


1976 Declartion Independence Thomas Jefferson Medal Silver Proof Don Warner picture
1976 Declartion Independence Thomas Jefferson Medal Silver Proof Don Warner


1850 - 1900 Brotherhood Union Philadelphia Badge Medal J H Diehl Truth Hope Love picture
1850 - 1900 Brotherhood Union Philadelphia Badge Medal J H Diehl Truth Hope Love


1976  American Revolution Massachusetts Bicentennial Bronze Coin Token Medal Htf picture
1976 American Revolution Massachusetts Bicentennial Bronze Coin Token Medal Htf


1970 United Nations Youth For Peace Medal picture
1970 United Nations Youth For Peace Medal


Antique Track Running Medal 1930's Camp 5th Infantry Mng picture
Antique Track Running Medal 1930's Camp 5th Infantry Mng


Antique Track Running Medal 1930's Decus Et Praesidium 5 picture
Antique Track Running Medal 1930's Decus Et Praesidium 5


Antique Swimmiing Medals 1930's Aau South Atlantic Association (3) picture
Antique Swimmiing Medals 1930's Aau South Atlantic Association (3)


Antique Swimming Medals 1930's The Evening Sun Newspaper Baltimore Md picture
Antique Swimming Medals 1930's The Evening Sun Newspaper Baltimore Md


Cupertino Coin Club Token Medal De Anza College / Big Eagle 16th Show 1986 picture
Cupertino Coin Club Token Medal De Anza College / Big Eagle 16th Show 1986