1863 Civil War Patriotic Cover + Letter Kellers Bridge Cynthiana Ky To Ohio For Sale

GREAT CIVIL WAR SOLDIER LETTER IN ENVELOPE, "HAIL COLUMBIA" CACHET, STAMP POSTMARKED CYNTHIANA KY FEB 18 1863." LETTER HEADLINED "KELLERS BRIDGE KY, FEB 18th, '63." SIGNED "P.S. SCOTT." SENT TO HIS MOTHER MRS JANE SCOTT, RUSHSYLVANIA, LOGAN CO, OHIO.". -- READS IN PART "I GOT A LETTER FROM MILLER TELLING ME CYNTHIANA HAD GONE TO ILLS. I GOT JOHNS LETTER WITH THOSE POSTAGE STAMPS, THE LAST LETTER I HAVE RECEIVED FROM HOME. I THINK I WILL GET ONE TODAY .... I GOT A LETTER FROM J.H.S. SCOTT ESQ .... AUNT BETSY IS LIVING WITH HIS SISTER AT OSKALOOSA. SHE WAS WELL - THEY HAD SICKNESS IN THEIR FAMILY LAST FALL. LOST ONE OF THE TWINS - FLU & MEASLES. HE SAID ABOUT 50 FROM HIS SCHOOL HAD GONE TO WAR HE SAID HE WOULD BE BUT FOR THE CRIPPLED LEFT ARM, HE HAS 117 SCHOLARS. DONT KNOW BUT THAT HE MAY HAVE TO GIVE UP HIS SCHOOL FOR WANT OF MEANS IF THE WAR SHOULD CONTINUE LONG ..." ALSO MENTIONS KENTON, EXPECT 20 DOLLARS SOON, ETC. ---- SUPERB ITEM !! --  SEE PHOTOS !!! , SHIPPING AND HANDLING IS $2.00 IN USA, OR $3.00 FOREIGN. ALL ITEMS OVER $40.00 IN USA MUST BE INSURED AT BUYERS COST. ALL ITEMS OVER $80.00 FOREIGN MUST BE REGISTERED AT BUYERS COST. I COMBINE SHIPPING COSTS ON MULTIPLE ITEM TO SAVE YOU MONEY. CHECK MY VERY HIGH response !!!!! ------------------- Second Battle of Cynthiana.—On Saturday, June 11, 1864, Gen. Morgan marched a second time upon Cynthiana, defeated and captured the forces under the command of Gen. E.H. Hobson.  The first of this series of engagements took place early in the morning, between the 168th Ohio infantry and Morgan’s whole command, about 1,200 strong.  The Federals were soon overpowered, and fell back to the depot buildings, (where Col. Berry fell, mortally wounded,) and thence to Rankin’s unfinished hotel; others retreated to the court house.  The Confederates, following closely, charged into these several places, causing the utmost consternation among the inhabitants.  While the battle was raging, a stable opposite the Rankin hotel caught or was set on fire, and the terror of the flames added greatly to the alarm.      Across the river, west of the town, another battle began between Gen. Hobson, commanding the 171st Ohio, and a detachment of Confederates.  This is known as the battle at “Keller’s Bridge,” one mile west of Cynthiana, which had been destroyed by the Confederates on the Thursday previous, to prevent the sending of troops along the railroad.  The trains which had conveyed the 171st Ohio to this point were backed down the road two miles for safety, but were there thrown from the track by the Confederates and burned.  Upon being disembarked, the men were supplied with ammunition, and proceeded to eat their breakfast.  Suddenly their quiet was disturbed by the rattle of musketry at Cynthiana, telling that hot work was going on there between the 168th Ohio and the Confederates.  A volley of musketry was poured in upon them, by a squad of Confederates massed behind the fence of a clover-field.  Gen. Hobson was now completely surrounded.  The Confederates displayed great activity in firing, and considerable skill in keeping under cover from the fire of the Federal troops.  The fight continued about five hours, the loss on both sides unusually heavy.  Gen. Morgan, who was in Cynthiana when the fight at the Bridge commenced, arrived on the field at 9 A.M. with reinforcements, and with these the line was drawn still closer; and Gen. Hobson was finally compelled to accept the Flag of truce and Morgan’s conditions of surrender—that the private property of the troops should be respected, and the officers retain their side-arms.  The Federal forces were drawn up along the pike, their arms stacked and burned, and they were marched through Cynthiana, a mile east, to a grove—where they found the other Federal forces who had been in the fight at Cynthiana, prisoners like themselves.  After resting an hour, the prisoners were marched 3 miles north, on the Oddville pike, where they passed Saturday night.      Early on Sunday morning, with the first announcement of the approach of Burbridge, came an order from Morgan to the guard over the Federal prisoners to start them north; which was done, and that, too, on the double quick—Morgan’s main force, pursued by Burbridge, following at a distance of a few miles.  This forced march brought them to Claysville, 12 miles N.E. of Cynthiana, where they were halted, drawn up in line, paroled, and allowed to depart.      While the battles were in progress on Saturday, the fire continued to rage, notwithstanding vigorous efforts to stop it by the citizens.  By twelve o’clock all the business portion of the town was consumed, with most of the contents.  The fire, commencing at Rankin’s stable, swept on to the West House, burning all the buildings; thence across to Broadwell’s corner, and down to Isaac T. Martin’s store; thence across to Dr. Broadwell’s buildings, to the jail, including that and the adjoining buildings—27 in all, the most valuable in the place.      On Sunday morning, the 12th of June, the day after the two battles above described, Gen. Burbridge, with a strong force, fell upon Morgan’s men at [Page 325] Cynthiana, while they were at breakfast.  Fatigued as they were by the previous day’s operations—which resulted in the defeat and capture of two distinct Federal forces—the Confederates were not in condition to withstand the shock of a fresh body of troops.  Burbridge, with his cavalry, was enabled to flank them, and thus turn their lines; while his infantry, in the center, advanced steadily, forcing them back on the town.  The fighting commenced on the Millersburg pike, about one mile east of Cynthiana.  But the Confederates—unable to hold out against the rapid and determined advance of superior numbers of fresh troops supported by artillery—soon gave way, and, by the time they reached Cynthiana, were in full retreat, and the retreat a rout.  One by one, they fell back through the town, crossed the river, and followed the Raven Creek pike.  Thus ended the last battle that was fought at Cynthiana in the war for Southern independence.  
1863 Civil War Patriotic Cover + Letter  Kellers Bridge Cynthiana Ky To Ohio

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