1953 Jewish Tin Passover Kosher Chocolate Litho Box Judaica Haggadah Candlebra


1953 Jewish Tin Passover Kosher Chocolate Litho Box Judaica Haggadah Candlebra

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1953 Jewish Tin Passover Kosher Chocolate Litho Box Judaica Haggadah Candlebra:
$155



DESCRIPOTION : Here for sale is a COLORFULand RICHLY illustrated ADVERTISING LITHO TIN Chocolates BOX which was manufactured and used in 1953 ( Dated ) in the USA , By the mythological Jewish Manufactor of sweets, Candies, Choclates etc named "BARTON'S" . The LITHO TIN BOX and its CHOCOLATE CONTENT are specificaly defined as KOSHER FOR PESSACH. "KASHER LE'PESSACH" in Hebrew and " FAMOUS FOR CONTINENTAL Passover CHOCOLATES" in English. Exquisitely and colorfuly ILLUSTRATED with images related to the Jewish Passover - PESSACH : A widely opened ILLUSTRATED HAGGADAH SHEL PESSACH where the Hebrew text is visible and readable. An exquisitely illustrated PESSACH PLATE with MAZZO and MAZZO COVER. A CANDLEBRA with lighted candles and a full GLASS of Passover KOSHER WINE. LOADED with Passover VERSES , Passover images , signs and ikons. Numerous different ILLUSTRATIONS , Rich with Jewish-Judaica traditional and religeous objects and scenes. The Hebrew text in a most beautiful calligraphy . Solid LITHO TIN. Including the ORIGINAL LID. Diameter 10". Height around 1 ". This kosher LITHO TIN BOX has magnificently escaped the cruel teeth of time and it's beautifuly preserved and in addition to its beauty for display , Can be used as a container for any desired use. . The Kosher TIN BOX is used , empty but yet in an excellent condition , The LITHO , Especialy of the illustrated face is glossy with its vivid colors, No dents , No rust, No scratches , Minor almost unseen imperfections . Excellent for display and/or any desired use. ( Pls look at scan for accurate AS IS images )TIN BOX will be sent inside a protectivepackaging . PAYMENT : Payment method accepted : Paypal. SHIPPMENT : Shipp worldwidevia registered airmail is $19 .Will be shipped inside a highly protective packaging. Handling within 3-5 days after payment. Estimated duration 14 days.
Passover, or Pesach (from: פֶּסַח in Hebrew, Yiddish), /ˈpesaχ/ Pesah, Pesakh, Yiddish: Peysekh, Paysakh, Paysokh) is an important Biblically-derived Jewish festival. Historically, together with Shavuot ("Pentecost") and Sukkot ("Tabernacles"), Passover is one of the three pilgrimage festivals (Shalosh Regalim) during which the entire population of the kingdom of Judah made a pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem. Samaritans still make this pilgrimage to Mount Gerizim, but only men participate in public worship.Passover commences on the 15th of the Hebrew month of Nisan and lasts for either seven days (in Israel) or eight days (in the diaspora). In Judaism, a day commences at dusk and lasts until the following dusk, thus the first day of Passover only begins after dusk of the 14th of Nisan and ends at dusk of the 15th day of the month of Nisan. The rituals unique to the Passover celebrations commence with the Passover Seder when the 15th of Nisan has begun. In the Northern Hemisphere Passover takes place in spring as the Torah prescribes it: "in the month of [the] spring" (בחדש האביב Exodus 23:15). It is one of the most widely observed Jewish holidays. The Jewish people celebrate Passover as a commemoration of their liberation over 3,300 years ago by God from slavery in ancient Egypt that was ruled by the Pharaohs, and their birth as a nation under the leadership of Moses. It commemorates the story of the Exodus as described in the Hebrew Bible especially in the Book of Exodus, in which the Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt. In the narrative of the Exodus, the Bible tells that God helped the Children of Israel escape from their slavery in Egypt by inflicting ten plagues upon the ancient Egyptians before the Pharaoh would release his Israelite slaves; the tenth and worst of the plagues was the death of the Egyptian first-born. The Israelites were instructed to mark the doorposts of their homes with the blood of a slaughtered spring lamb and, upon seeing this, the spirit of the Lord knew to pass over the first-born in these homes, hence the name of the holiday.There is some debate over where the term is actually derived from. When the Pharaoh freed the Israelites, it is said that they left in such a hurry that they could not wait for bread dough to rise (leaven). In commemoration, for the duration of Passover no leavened bread is eaten, for which reason it is called "The Festival of the Unleavened Bread".Thus Matzo (flat unleavened bread) is eaten during Passover and it is a symbol of the holiday. The Passover Seder (Hebrew: סֵדֶר‎ order, arrangement"; Yiddish: Seyder) is a Jewish ritual feast that marks the beginning of the Jewish holiday of Passover. It is conducted on the evenings of the 14th day of Nisan in the Hebrew calendar, and on the 15th by traditionally observant Jews living outside Israel. This corresponds to late March or April in the Gregorian calendar. The Seder is a ritual performed by a community or by multiple generations of a family, involving a retelling of the story of the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in ancient Egypt. This story is in the Book of Exodus (Shemot) in the Hebrew Bible. The Seder itself is based on the Biblical verse commanding Jews to retell the story of the Exodus from Egypt: "You shall tell your child on that day, saying, 'It is because of what the LORD did for me when I came out of Egypt.'" (Exodus 13:8) Traditionally, families and friends gather in the evening to read the text of the Haggadah, an ancient work derived from the Mishnah (Pesahim 10).The Haggadah contains the narrative of the Israelite exodus from Egypt, special blessings and rituals, commentaries from the Talmud, and special Passover songs. Seder customs include drinking four cups of wine, eating matza, partaking of symbolic foods placed on the Passover Seder Plate, and reclining in celebration of freedom. The Seder is performed in much the same way by Jews all over the world. The Haggadah (Hebrew: הַגָּדָה‎, "telling", plural: Haggadot) is a Jewish text that sets forth the order of the Passover Seder. Reading the Haggadah at the Seder table is a fulfillment of the Scriptural commandment to each Jew to "tell your son" of the Jewish liberation from slavery in Egypt as described in the Book of Exodus in the Torah. ("And thou shalt tell thy son in that day, saying: It is because of that which the LORD did for me when I came forth out of Egypt. " Ex. 13:8) Sephardi and Mizrahi Jews also apply the term Haggadah to the service itself, as it constitutes the act of "telling your son." This is the second installment in a series about chocolate from Jeffrey Yoskowitz. The first, A Seder Different From All Other Seders, confronted the reality of Passover without Barton's Chocolates after its parent company went out of business earlier this year. Beyond its indelible mark on collective Jewish memory and its creation of a successful kosher brand, Barton's played a key role in shaping the modern, billion-dollar kosher food industry. It was specifically the battle between Barton's and Barricini that challenged the nascent kosher industry and its largest player, the Orthodox Union (OU).By 1950, Barricini was enviously eyeing Barton's monopolization of the Jewish purse. The company applied for kosher certification from the OU's burgeoning kosher food division. Barton's--having billed itself as the "Jewish company" and having already rejected OU certification, because too many demands and arbitrary high standards would force Stephen Klein, the founder of the company, to restructure his facilities--reacted aggressively.Kosher certification is a service provided by several Jewish organizations in America whereby trained rabbinic authorities inspect the ingredients and processes food companies use. The OU was the first and the largest certifying agency, whose goal was to define what is kosher for the modern, mass-manufactured food industry. Stamps of approval, hekshers, are placed on the packages. They aren't cheap. Certain lay leaders of the OU were more focused on growth, on bringing kosher food to the mainstream--revitalizing Judaism through the stomach.Barton's rejection of certification frightened the OU. "If it isn't a box of Barton's, is it right for a Jewish Home?" went the company's slogan, emphasizing the fact that it was a Sabbath-observing company with visible Jewish character. The slogan implicitly challenged the OU for certifying a company that was neither. Klein hired an independent rabbi from upstate New York, a family friend, to supply kosher certification for Barton's.The smear campaign against Barricini and the OU led to in-fighting between the business-oriented Kashrut Commission and the Rabbinical Council of America, the OU's rabbinical arm, over the future of kosher food in America. The real dilemma was that Barricini franchise stores were open on the Sabbath, even though the owner of the brand was Jewish. Certain lay leaders of the OU were more focused on growth, on bringing kosher food to the mainstream--revitalizing Judaism through the stomach--and supported Barricini. The Religious Council was focused on overall religious observance, and supported Barton's.Without the approval of the Religious Council, the OU gave its certification to Barricini, deciding that technically the franchise stores were owned by a corporation, not individuals, and that they would only hold the processing plant to its Sabbath observing standards. It was a ruling relevant to the modern day.Barton's continued to resist the OU, and continued to compete with Barricini for the Jewish market. Barricini did siphon off Barton's sales, but failed to attain a significant share of the market. And Barton's finally gave in and sought OU certification.The OU could not pass up the opportunity to place its stamp on Barton's, one of the most important Jewish companies in the U.S. And yet doing so would nearly guarantee Barton's full dominance in the market. Not used to making certifications that would determine the outcome of business, the OU ultimately decided to give its certification to any business that requests it and is willing to comply with the OU's standards--a strategy that helped the OU grow tremendously in the following decades.A Passover, and a World, Post-Barton'sEven with the death of Barton's, there will be no chocolate shortages for Passover."From all over the world there's better chocolate," Joan Nathan, cookbook author and Jewish food authority, unsentimentally describes the situation. "In a way that's a good thing. At one point Barton's was the only player. That's no longer the case."There's certainly hope, at least among the Klein family and nostalgic American Jews, that Barton's will be revived, though it seems unlikely in the near future.Now that corporations have bought many of the family-owned kosher businesses, Passover shopping is hardly an inspiring, almost spiritual expression of one's identity, as it may have been for some in the era of Barton's Bonbonniere.When American Safety Razor bought the company, at the start of the 1980s--and, it hoped, access to the Jewish market with it--the company clung to its brand recognition from the glory years, while slowly reducing the brand's quality."I'm better off without it and so are my children," Hasia Diner says, largely because of the sugar content, she says. We can only hope we all are too. 2920

1953 Jewish Tin Passover Kosher Chocolate Litho Box Judaica Haggadah Candlebra:
$155

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