4 Handwritten Civil War Soldier's Diaries Crosby Co I 3rd Bat 5th Reg Ny Battles For Sale

“James Crosby dead. Our aged and one of most respected citizens, J. H. Crosby, died at his home in our city on last Saturday morning March 21st, 1903. The deceased was born in Martinsburg N.Y. February 21st, 1825 in which state he made his home until he came to South Dakota in 1882 except the three years he served in the Union Army. On May 20th, 1853 he was married to Miss Caroline R. Clark who was born January 21st, 1829 and died September 26th, 1899. (Her obituary is also included in these diaries). The union was blessed with three children Dr. J. H. Crosby and the Misses Anna and Irma Crosby who are residents of our city. When our nation was overshadowed with the dark cloud of civil strife and it required men to keep the stars and stripes from being trailed in the dust, the deceased enlisted on August 21st, 1862 in Co. I 5th, N.Y. Artillery and served until June 24th, 1865. During this time of service he was with his company at Harper’s Ferry, Forts Smith, Carroll Maryland Heights and Washington D.C. In 1882 when all eyes were turned westward and the praise of rich soil of the Dakotas was the talk of the people of the Eastern states, Mr. Crosby decided to come west and build a home in the frontier…….”

I very quickly glanced through and tried to gather a few quotes but this is just by skimming through them; I know there is so much more that I’ve missed…..

“May 30th, 1863. Morning orders at sundown last night to march this morning at six o’clock and report at Fort Cochran. Started at about 7:30 and halted at the Navy yard bridge to rest again at the capitol and again at the President’s House and reported at Fort Cochran at 12 O’clock then reached about one mile to Fort McDowell N. West of Georgetown in Virginia. Here we arrived about 1 o’clock P.M. tried and hungry and covered with dust. Pitched what few tents we had and the rest prepared to take their first nights sleep on the ground. We are about eight miles North of Fort Carroll.”

“July 14th, 1863. Morning weather cloudy and hot. No air a stirring. Commenced to make me a crick bedstead. Put up some shelves in the store house. Noon weather cloudy and hot wind east. Finished my bed. Commenced to make a box for the fuses. The Major came in on his horse in a terrible hurry and said that there was rebel Calvary out in the country. There was a detail of about forty men sent out to watch them. Not much a stirring. Traded my watch for a revolver and gave three dollars difference.”

“September 2nd, 1863. Morning weather cloudy and cool without much. Round a fire broke out about midnight in a soap factory near the bridge in Georgetown. One woman (black) and two children reported burned. Cleaned out the shop and put things in order. Noon weather pleasant and warm. Wind still. Done nothing this afternoon. Dress parade at 5:30. Elbridge Allen’s sentence thirty days to hard labor. Evening weather pleasant.”

“November 5th, 1863. Morning weather pleasant. Solomon Jones, George and myself got the Capt pass to Alexandria then went to the Provo Marshall’s office and got his pass to cross the river to Maryland then took the boat to Washington. Got some dinner then took the boat to Young’s Point from there to Fort Carroll. Stayed there awhile then started for the city by way of the Navy Yard Bridge. Went into the Navy Yard a little while then took the street cars for Georgetown. There got something to eat. Bought some apples then started and crossed the Aqueduct Bridge and got back to the garrison about 7 o’clock P.M. pretty well tuckered out. Traveled about fifteen miles on foot and by water and cars, 10 or 12 more…”

“January 26th, 1864. Morning weather warm and pleasant. George Patten, Jefferson Seymour, Lewis Webber, Henry Meyers, Gardner Dickenson and myself started for the Antietam Battlefield at precisely 7 o’clock. Distance 12 miles. Arrived at Sharpsburg about 11 o’clock and got back to the battery about 7 o’clock P.M. pretty tired after walking twenty five miles.”

“February 3rd, 1864. Morning weather cold, cloudy and a little snow. Wind blowing a terrible gale from the W. Soldiers continue to pore in at Harper’s Ferry so that the valley is full of them. Anticipated rebel attack on Martinsburg. Two railroad bridges burnt near Cumberland by the rebels. Jake R_____ returned from home.”

“July 26th, 1864. Morning weather pleasant and a light wind. The army still in the valley. Made a box to put fews in and done some other tinkering. No rebs in sight and all quiet up here. Five o’clock P.M. the infantry force are moving out of P. Valley and crossing the river at the ferry and over Bolivar into the Shenandoah Valley. Rebs reported moving in the direction of Ohio. Weather hot and smoky.”

“August 5th, 1864. Morning weather pleasant with a light wind. The 19th Army Corps, Maj. General ______ commanding arrived last night and are encamped between here and Ft. Duncan. The rebs have crossed a large train of wagons into Md at Shepherdstown. Gen inspection. Reb Cavalry in sight, moving in the direction of Martinsburg. Weather quite warm.”

“August 13th, 1864. Morning weather about the same as usual. Corporal Jones and two privates of Co. L. was killed at the Hook by the cars running over them and two or three badly wounded. One had to have his leg taken off. Three men of the 161st Ohio were killed by the explosion of a shell that they found and pounded it with a stone. It blew one man all to ____.”

There is so much more but that should give you a good idea. The scanned pages above are from just a few of the battle entries. And I didn’t even go thought the 1865 diary. I believe the scans above can be read easily so you can see what kind of entries there are in these diaries. Again just browsing through them I was totally amazed at what I was reading. They are very detailed and his entries are long. He’s either in camp, on the road with the troops or stationed at a fort. He talks a lot about trains being taken and burned, rebel prisoners, sickness in camp, battles, building beds and outbuildings for the troops, what he eats, letters from home, visitors to camp, Lincoln’s death, other battles they hear of and so much more. I don’t want to read too much because it makes me want them too bad. I’ve scanned several pages but trust me when I say they are amazing. And to get them straight from the family is also quite rare. It’s getting harder and harder to find diaries that stay together like this, especially civil war soldier diaries. You will not be disappointed with this incredible lot. Please email me with any questions.


4 Handwritten Civil War Soldier's Diaries Crosby Co I 3rd Bat 5th Reg Ny Battles

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