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Civil War 1861 Letter From Salmon P. Chase, Battle Of Port Royal For Sale

Civil War 1861 Letter From Salmon P. Chase, Battle Of Port Royal

CIVIL WAR 1861 Letter from Salmon P. Chase, Battle of Port Royal

This an original 1861 letter (file copy) from Salmon P. Chase of the Treasury Deartment concerning taking ice and provisions to Civil War soldiers after The Battle of Port Royal. Dated Dec. 23, 1861.


A "file copy" is a letter written at the same time as the original by a secretary and saved in the files for reference. This letter is signed by Chase's secretary.


"Sir


An application has been made to this department by Mess. Russell Conant of Boston for permission to send vessels loaded with ice and provisions to Fort Royal and other points, for the use of the troops on the coast, subject to such regulations as the commander of the forces there may establish.


I see no objection to clearances being granted to the vessels for such a trade, under the same restrictions as in the cases of Mess. Sprague Soule, and Erastus Sampson, .. you will require the parties to give bonds in double the value of the cargo that they will communicate only with the Blockading Squadron, and the US troops on shore at the blockaded forts.


They will also submit a list of officers of the said vessels to this Department for approval.


I am very respectfully

S. P. Chase

Secretary of the Treasury"


Approximate Dimensions: 8" x 10"


Condition: There are creases where it was original folded. It is overall in very good condition. Please see the photos for more details and the most accurate description of its condition.


The Battle of Port Royal was one of the earliest amphibious operations of the American Civil War, in which a United States Navy fleet and United States Army expeditionary force captured Port Royal Sound, South Carolina, between Savannah, Georgia and Charleston, South Carolina, on November 7, 1861. The sound was guarded by two forts on opposite sides of the entrance, Fort Walker on Hilton Head Island to the south and Fort Beauregard on Phillip's Island to the north. A small force of four gunboats supported the forts, but did not materially affect the battle.


The attacking force assembled outside of the sound beginning on November 3 after being battered by a storm during their journey down the coast. Because of losses in the storm, the army was not able to land, so the battle was reduced to a contest between ship-based guns and those on shore.


The fleet moved to the attack on November 7, after more delays caused by the weather during which additional troops were brought into Fort Walker. Flag Officer Du Pont ordered his ships to keep moving in an elliptical path, bombarding Fort Walker on one leg and Fort Beauregard on the other; the tactic had recently been used effectively at the Battle of Hatteras Inlet. His plan soon broke down, however, and most ships took enfilading positions that exploited a weakness in Fort Walker. The Confederate gunboats put in a token appearance, but fled up a nearby creek when challenged. Early in the afternoon, most of the guns in the fort were out of action, and the soldiers manning them fled to the rear. A landing party from the flagship took possession of the fort.


When Fort Walker fell, the commander of Fort Beauregard across the sound feared that his soldiers would soon be cut off with no way to escape, so he ordered them to abandon the fort. Another landing party took possession of the fort and raised the Union flag the next day.


Despite the heavy volume of fire, loss of life on both sides was low, at least by standards set later in the Civil War. Only eight were killed in the fleet and eleven on shore, with four other Southerners missing. Total casualties came to less than 100.



Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist who served as U.S. Senator from Ohio and the 23rd Governor of Ohio; as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln; and as the sixth Chief Justice of the United States.


Chase was one of the most prominent members of the new Republican Party before becoming Chief Justice. Chase articulated the "slave power conspiracy" thesis well before Lincoln, devoting his energies to the destruction of what he considered the Slave Power—the conspiracy of Southern slave owners to seize control of the federal government and block the progress of liberty. He coined the slogan of the Free Soil Party, "Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men".


Chase served as Secretary of the Treasury in President Lincoln's cabinet from 1861 to 1864, during the Civil War. In that period of crisis, there were two great changes in American financial policy, the establishment of a national banking system and the issue of paper currency. The former was Chase's own particular measure. He suggested the idea, worked out the important principles and many of the details, and induced the Congress to approve them. It not only secured an immediate market for government bonds, but also provided a permanent uniform, stable national currency. Chase ensured that the Union could sell debt to pay for the war effort. He worked with Jay Cooke & Company to successfully manage the sale of $500 million in government war bonds (known as 5/20s) in 1862.


The first U.S. federal currency, the greenback demand note, was printed in 1861–1862, during Chase's tenure as Secretary of the Treasury. These greenbacks formed the basis for today's paper currency. It was Chase's responsibility to design the notes. In an effort to further his political career, his face appeared on a variety of U.S. paper currency, starting with the $1 bill so that the people would recognize him.


On October 10, 1862, Lincoln’s Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles wrote that “a scheme for permits, special favors, Treasury agents, and improper management” existed and was arranged by Treasury Secretary Chase for General John A. Dix. The motive of Chase appeared to be for political influence and not for financial gain.


Perhaps Chase's chief defect was an insatiable desire for high office. Throughout his term as Treasury Secretary, Chase exploited his position to build up political support for another run at the Presidency in 1864.


He also tried to pressure Lincoln by repeatedly threatening resignation, which he knew would cause Lincoln difficulties with the Radical Republicans.


To honor Chase for introducing the modern system of banknotes, he was depicted on the $10,000 bill printed from 1928 to 1946. Chase was instrumental in placing the phrase "In God We Trust" on United States coins.


The Chase National Bank, a predecessor of Chase Manhattan Bank which is now JPMorgan Chase, was named in his honor, though he had no financial affiliation with it.



~ Take a look at myother salesfor more vintage and antique collector's items!I am happy to combine shipping. I will be adding MANY new items in the coming weeks. ~Payment MethodPaypal
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Civil War 1861 Letter From Salmon P. Chase, Battle Of Port Royal

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