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Henry Garnet Societie Of The Rosary 1596 Secret Jesuit Press Gunpowderplot 1stnr For Sale

Henry Garnet Societie Of The Rosary 1596 Secret Jesuit Press Gunpowderplot 1stnr

  PRINTED IN ENGLAND AND IN ENGLISH AT THE SECRET PRESS OF THE JESUIT ORDER IN ENGLAND IN 1596 OR 1597.

 

OFFERED WITH is THE VERY RARE 1596/1597 FIRST EDITION OF ‘THE SOCIETIE OF THE ROSARY,’ AUTHORED BY HENRY GARNET, THE HEAD OF THE SECRET JESUIT ORDER IN ENGLAND, PRINTED SECRETLY IN ENLAND IN 1596 OR 1597 AT THE SECOND SECRET PRESS OPERATED BY GARNET (WHO WOULD IN 1606 BE EXECUTED FOR HIS ROLE IN THE GUNPOWDER PLOT), ‘The Societie of the Rosary’ complete in all respects, IN ENGLISH THROUGHOUT, INCLUDING THE PROPAGANDISTIC PREFACE, printed in small octavo, BEAUTIFULLY ADORNED WITH WOODCUT INITIALS, HEADPIECES, AND A FINE REPEATED WOODCUT OF MADONNA AND CHILD, containing a history of the Society of the Rosary, its reason for existence, and the prayers of the Rosary in Latin and in English, augmented by ‘An Epistle Consolatory of an Auncient Pope To the Catholicks of Albania,’ KNOWN IN ONLY 9 INSTITUTIONAL EXAMPLES WORLDWIDE (ACCORDING TO ESTC), NOT AT HARVARD, YALE, CHICAGO OR THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, AND NOT AT sale DURING THE PAST HALF-CENTURY.

 

AN EXTRAORDINARY SURVIVAL OF THE GREATEST RARITY AND INTEREST – THIS BOOK WAS PRINTED AT THE SECRET PRESS OF HENRY GARNET, THE HEAD OF THE (PROSCRIBED) JESUIT ORDER IN ENGLAND FROM 1586 UNTIL HIS EXECUTION IN 1606. HE WAS EXECUTED FOR HIS ROLE IN THE 1605 GUNDPOWDER PLOT, IN WHICH GUY FAWKES ATTEMPTED TO EXPLODE A BARREL OF GUNPOWDER BENEATH PARLIAMENT.

 

The full title reads as follows:

 

“The Societie of the Rosary. / Newly Augmented. / Gaude Maria Virgo, cunctas haereses sola interemisti in universe mundo. / Dignare me laudare te / Virgo Sacrata. / Da mihi virtutem / contra hostes tuos.”

 

The full title of the ‘Epistle Consolatory of an Auncient Pope’ reads as follows:

 

“An Epistle Consolatory: Of an Auncient Pope. / To the Catholicks of Albania sore aggrieved with the Persecution of the Heretickes of those diaes. / Newly translated into English.”

  ONLY ONE EXAMPLE OF ONE BOOK PRINTED BY HENRY GARNET AT EITHER OF HIS SECRET PRESSES IN ENGLAND DURING THE 16TH CENTURY WAS OFFERED AT sale BETWEEN 1950 AND 2012.  

Henry Garnet (July 1555 – 3 May 1606), sometimes Henry Garnett, was an English Jesuit priest executed for his complicity in theGunpowder Plot of 1605. Born in Heanor, Derbyshire, he was educated in Nottingham and later at Winchester College, before moving to London in 1571 to work for a publisher. There he professed an interest in legal studies, and in 1575 he travelled to the continent and joined the Society of Jesus. He was ordained in Rome some time around 1582.

 

In 1586 Garnet returned to England as part of the Jesuit mission, soon succeeding Father William Weston as Jesuit superior following the latter's capture by the English authorities. Garnet established a secret press, which lasted until late 1588, and in 1594 he interceded in a dispute between secular and regular clergy, known as the Wisbech Stirs. He preferred a passive approach to the problems Catholics faced in England, approving of the disclosure by Catholic priests of the existence of the 1603 Bye Plot, and exhorting English Catholics not to engage in violent rebellion.

 

In summer 1605 Garnet met with Robert Catesby, a religious zealot who, unknown to him, planned to kill the Protestant King James I. The existence of Catesby's Gunpowder Plot was revealed to him by Father Oswald Tesimond on 24 July 1605, but as the information was received under the seal of the confessional, he felt that Canon law prevented him from speaking out. Instead, without telling anyone of what Catesby planned, he wrote to his superiors in Rome and urged them to warn English Catholics against the use of force.

 

The warrant for Garnet’s arrest gives a wonderful description of his physical appearance:

 

of a middling stature, full faced, fat of body, of complexion fair, his forehead high on each side, with a little thin hair coming down upon the middest of the fore part of this head; his hair and beard griseled. Of age between fifty and three score. His beard on his cheeks close cut, and his chin very thin and somewhat short. His gait upright, and comely for a feeble man.”

 

Following the plot's failure Garnet went into hiding, but was eventually arrested on 27 January 1606. He was taken to London and interrogated by the Privy Council, whose members included John Popham, Edward Coke and Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury. Imprisoned in the Tower of London, his conversations with fellow prisoner Edward Oldcorne were monitored by eavesdroppers, and his letters to friends such as Anne Vaux were intercepted. His guilt, announced at the end of his trial on 28 March 1606, was a foregone conclusion. Criticised for his use of equivocation, which Coke called "open and broad lying and forswearing", and attacked for not warning the authorities of what Catesby planned, he was sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered. He was executed on 3 May 1606.

 

Wikipedia further states the following concerning Garnet’s work as head of the secret Jesuit order in England:

 

“After meeting the Jesuit superior for England William Weston at a London inn, Garnet, Southwell and Weston travelled to Harlesford, near Marlow, Buckinghamshire. Spending just over a week at the home of Richard Bold, they engaged in prayer and masses, and also took confessions. They discussed their mission in England, deciding to meet each year in February and August (later changed to Easter and autumn). Weston also gave the two men details of Catholic houses that would shelter them.

 

Acquaviva had instructed that should anything happen to Weston, Garnet was to succeed him as superior in England, which he did when only days after leaving Harlesford, Weston was captured en route to London. Acquaviva had also given Garnet permission to print pro-Catholic literature, and so early the next year he met Southwell in London to discuss the establishment of a secret press, which was probably located somewhere around a former Augustinian hospital near Spitalfields. It lasted until late 1588 and was responsible forA Consolatory Letter to All the Afflicted Catholikes in England, author unknown, and An Epistle of Comfort, by Southwell. From a friend's window in Ludgate Hill, Garnet witnessed the November 1588 procession to a Thanksgiving service at Old St Paul's Cathedral, celebrating the failed Spanish invasion. Spain's actions gave Garnet much cause for concern, "For when we thought that there was an end to these disasters by which we are already nearly destroyed, our hope was suddenly turned to sorrow, and now with redoubled effort the overseers are pressing upon us". People were allowed to spectate from windows only if their loyalty to Queen Elizabeth I was guaranteed by the householder. In a letter to Acquaviva, Garnet said that many of his supporters thought that he was more concerned for the Queen than her Calvinist ministers. In light of the Armada's destruction, he also wrote to the general to ask for advice on two versions of a proposed oath to allow Roman Catholics to swear their allegiance to the Queen. The government's version required that Catholics reject the pope's authority over Elizabeth, whereas the Catholic version proposed that they recognise her authority and "would wish with every effort to struggle to thwart and to fight to the death all those who will in any way endanger the life of her Highness". The Privy Council rejected the latter.

 

Garnet's first few years in England were spent meeting new priests in London, including John Gerard and Edward Oldcorne. Jesuits had been banished from England since 1585, and if discovered they risked being charged with high treason. Avoiding pursuers was therefore a recurrent problem, and Garnet was almost caught on several occasions. As a result of an almost disastrous meeting at Baddesley Clinton in 1591, when he and many others were almost captured together while renewing their vows, he reorganised the mission into eleven smaller groups, each assigned two weeks annually. Following Southwell's capture in June 1592, and the search of Anne Vaux and Eleanor Brooksby's rented house in Warwickshire, he wrote to Acquaviva to ask for an assistant who could succeed him as superior. Henry Walpole was thus dispatched, but was captured on his arrival in December 1593, and executed in York in April 1595.[1] Garnet believed that it was his duty to observe (in disguise) the executions of his fellow priests, so as to secretly administer the last rites, and he may have been present at Southwell's execution at Tyburn in 1595. The latter's death was a significant blow for Garnet, who later wrote of the "intolerable burden of loneliness" he carried while in England.

 

In November 1593 Garnet travelled to the decrepit and decayed Wisbech Castle, requisitioned by the government in 1579 for the internment of Catholic priests. William Weston was held there. The castle's inhabitants were supported by Catholic alms and lived a relatively comfortable existence; Garnet was complimentary about Wisbech, calling it a "college of venerable confessors". The following year he mediated in a dispute there between secular and regular clergy (the latter represented by the Jesuits), which became known as the Wisbech Stirs. The argument was settled by the end of the year, but Garnet was concerned that reports of discontent at the Jesuit-administered English College in Rome and tension between some Catholic English exiles in Brussels might undermine his efforts to stabilise the situation.

   

Wikipedia further states the following concerning Garnet’s role in the Gunpowder Plot and, allegedly, in several other conspiracies:

 

“Garnet was at Coughton Court on 6 November when Thomas Bates brought news of the plot's failure. Catesby wanted him to help raise support in Wales, where it was thought Catholic support would be more likely, but Garnet was horrified. In a letter to Catesby and Digby, he urged them to abandon their "wicked actions" and follow the pope's advice. He spent weeks on the run but was eventually arrested on 27 January 1606, atHindlip Hall. There, for eight days, he and Fr. Edward Oldcorne (later beatified as the Blessed Edward Oldcorne) secreted themselves in a small, cramped space, unable even to stand or stretch their legs. They received sustenance from their protectors through a small drinking straw hidden within the building's structure, but with no commode or drainage they were eventually forced by "customs of nature which must of necessity be done" to emerge from hiding, and were immediately captured. They were taken first to Holt Castle in Worcestershire, and a few days later to London. Garnet was still weak from his ordeal, and Salisbury therefore ordered that he be given a good mount; his supplies were paid for by the king. The group was accompanied by a Puritan minister who "ranted at length without interruption", but Garnet's replies remained erudite, brief and clear—much to the minister's disappointment. On his arrival in London he was taken to the Gatehouse Prison in Westminster, already home to many Catholic prisoners, including his nephew, Father Thomas Garnet.

   

“Garnet's trial took place on Friday 28 March 1606. He was taken to the Guildhall by closed coach; an unusual method, considering prisoners were usually walked to trial, though the authorities may have had some concern about support from a sympathetic crowd. The trial began at about 9:30 am and lasted all day. In attendance were King James (hidden from public view) and several courtiers including Lady Arbella Stuartand Catherine Howard, Countess of Suffolk. Garnet was introduced with his various aliases, which included "Whalley, otherwise Darcy, otherwise Roberts, otherwise Farmer, otherwise Philips". He was accused of having conspired with Catesby on 9 June 1605 to kill the king, his son, and to "alter and subvert the government of the kingdom and the true worship of God established in England". He was also accused of having conspired with several others to blow up the House of Lords with gunpowder. He pleaded "not guilty."

 

“Speaking for the government, Edward Coke accused him of involvement in every treason since 1586, the year he returned to England. According to Coke, the provincial superior was involved in the Main and Bye Plots of 1603. He had sent Edmund Baynham to Rome to gain papal approval for the 1605 plot, and while at Coughton in November, had prayed "for the success of the great action". Coke called Garnet "a doctor of five Ds, namely, of dissimulation, of deposing of princes, of disposing of kingdoms, of daunting and deterring of subjects, and of destruction". His supposed inappropriate relationship with Anne Vaux was mentioned, but his adherence to the doctrine of equivocation proved extremely damaging. Francis Tresham's deathbed letter, which claimed that Garnet had played no part in the so-called Spanish Treason, was read aloud. Tresham claimed not to have seen Garnet "for fifteen or sixteen years before", despite government evidence that the two had met more recently. Garnet had not seen the letter and did not know that it referred to events before 1602, not 1605. He was unable to explain it, except by saying "it may be, my Lord, that he meant to equivocate."

 

“Statements regarding Jesuit-encouraged plots against Queen Elizabeth were read to the court, as well as some of the plotters' confessions. Garnet defended his use of equivocation with his own treatise on the doctrine. He had denied his conversation with Oldcorne as it was a secret, but said that in matters of faith, equivocation could never be lawful. When asked by Salisbury what he would do if the pope excommunicated King James, he "denied to answer". His defence of equivocation was scorned by Coke, who called it "open and broad lying and forswearing". As for Tesimond's confession, the planned assassination had not at that point happened and so Salisbury said that Garnet could easily have alerted the government. Salisbury attacked the idea that it had ever been made under the seal of the confessional, and claimed anyway that Garnet could have warned the authorities after his more ordinary conversation with Catesby about the death of innocents; the priest replied by saying that at the time, he did not understand the relevance of Catesby's questions. The Earl of Northampton said, in Latin, "quod non prohibet cum potest, jubet" (what a man does not foroffer when he can, he orders). Garnet's defence, that he had forofferden Catesby from proceeding, was futile.

 

“The jury took fifteen minutes to decide that Garnet was guilty of treason. He was sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered.”

   

THE ‘SOCIETIE OF THE ROSARY’ IS COMPLETE IN ALL RESPECTS. The volume is paginated as follows: [44], 168, [12], 169-231, [1]; 19. The ‘Epistle Consolatory’ appears complete; certainly, the English text of the ‘Epistle’ is complete. ESTC calls for a Latin translation of the epistle to follow the English epistle, and there is no Latin translation in this copy. However, there is no catchword upon the final page and nothing in the book suggests the presence of a Latin epistle. It is entirely possible that the Latin epistle was added later or did not appear in all copies – there are, after all, only 9 institutional copies of the book known to exist. The volume measures about 13.0 cm by 7.8 cm by 2.3 cm; each leaf measures about 123 mm by 69 mm.

 

The volume is attractively bound in modern paneled calf in antique style, with the spine divided by raised bands into 6 compartments and with a red morocco label in the second compartment from the head. The binding is in fine condition and is essentially unrestored.

 

Internally, the volume is in very good to excellent condition, with generally clean pages, clear print and ample margins throughout. The first five leaves are restored at the lower outer corner without affecting the text. The title is also toned and a little scuffed at the inner margin (but without loss of the imprint). Generally, though, this is a very appealing example internally.

 

In all, this is THE VERY RARE 1596/1597 FIRST EDITION OF ‘THE SOCIETIE OF THE ROSARY,’ AUTHORED BY HENRY GARNET, THE HEAD OF THE SECRET JESUIT ORDER IN ENGLAND, PRINTED SECRETLY IN ENLAND IN 1596 OR 1597 AT THE SECOND SECRET PRESS OPERATED BY GARNET (WHO WOULD IN 1606 BE EXECUTED FOR HIS ROLE IN THE GUNPOWDER PLOT), ‘The Societie of the Rosary’ is complete in all respects, IN ENGLISH THROUGHOUT, INCLUDING THE PROPAGANDISTIC PREFACE, printed in small octavo, BEAUTIFULLY ADORNED WITH WOODCUT INITIALS, HEADPIECES, AND A FINE REPEATED WOODCUT OF MADONNA AND CHILD, containing a history of the Society of the Rosary, its reason for existence, and the prayers of the Rosary in Latin and in English, augmented by ‘An Epistle Consolatory of an Auncient Pope To the Catholicks of Albania,’ KNOWN IN ONLY 9 INSTITUTIONAL EXAMPLES WORLDWIDE (ACCORDING TO ESTC), NOT AT HARVARD, YALE, CHICAGO OR THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, AND NOT AT sale DURING THE PAST HALF-CENTURY, and OFFERED WITH .

 

 

Please take the time necessary to review the photos below in order to gain a better understanding of the content and condition of the volume. Please also take a moment to view my other sales of rare and desirable English and Continental printed books dating from the 15th through the 19th century.

 

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Henry Garnet Societie Of The Rosary 1596 Secret Jesuit Press Gunpowderplot 1stnr

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