John Lennon Walls & Bridges Lp, Authentic Very 1st Uk Press 1974, Unplayed Mint


John Lennon Walls & Bridges Lp, Authentic Very 1st Uk Press 1974, Unplayed Mint

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John Lennon Walls & Bridges Lp, Authentic Very 1st Uk Press 1974, Unplayed Mint:
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So long ago,
Was it in a dream? Was it just a dream?
I know, yes, I know,
It seemed so very real, it seemed so real to me.

Took a walk down the street,
Through the heat whispered trees,
I thought I could hear, (hear, hear, hear.)
Somebody call out my name, as it started to rain.
Two spirits dancing so strange.
Ah! Bowakawa pouseé, pouseé.

Dream, dream away,
Magic in the air, was magic in the air?
I believe, yes, I believe,
More I cannot say, what more can I say?

On a river of sound,
Through the mirror go round, round,
I thought I could feel, (feel, feel, feel,)
Music touching my soul, something warm, sudden cold,
The spirit dance was unfolding.
Ah! Bowakawa pouseé pouseé...   "Possession is nine-tenths of the problem" - Dr. Winston O'Boogie.
The details given in this description apply strictly to the UK first pressing, because the vast majority of "Walls & Bridges"
on sold as 'first pressings' are from the period immediately following John's death, the early 1980's.  By then, EMI no
longer used coded letters in the run-out grooves at 3 'o clock, instead digits were directly stamped designating the order or
indexing of the record's pressing position.  Changes continued after the stability of the 60's and 70's, that was 'Stage One',
next, while still in the early 1980's,' Stage Two' of altering the indexing format, saw all 3 & 9 'o clock stampings discontinued
  and moved onto the end of the maitrix during the second half of 1982, maitrixes were left in their original 6 'o clock position.
  Including budget labels 'Music For Pleasure' & 'Fame', for most of his albums, the fact is, more UK pressings of John Lennon's
LP's were made in the 80's decade of his death, than for the original releases before his 1975 'retirement.'  That even includeed
  "Imagine," EMI had surplus albums and also released a very large box set containing every solo LP from "Live Peace In Toronto."
  The reason is obvious enough, multiple changes occured to "Walls & Bridges" and these first issues are unique, complications
  arise because all the printed items, like the pictures inner sleeve and lyrics./ pictures book  were re-made for the re-issues.
  That happened to "Walls & Bridges" alone in the 1980's, for other albums the 'missing' items help to identify individual albums
as blatant re-issues, often just pre-dating the bar code era. For example, "Imagine" and the "Plastic Ono Band" or first solo LP,
did not have the custom printed lyrics /credits inner sleeves, only the early 1970's first pressings did.
  JOHN LENNON: "Walls & Bridges" LP. UK VERY FIRST PRESSING, 19th OCTOBER 1974.

APPLE LABEL: PCTC 253

MAITRIX: YEX 937 -  Z5 / YEX 938 -  Z6

EMI STAMPING CODES: PG 2  /  MO  (blank)  I often find the  3 & 9 'o clock stampings partially under the labels like the maitrix,
so it was probably was covered by the label.  The final part of the pressing procedure was fixing the labels, which places any of
the stamped details in the run-out grooves before that, with a '2' digit on the other side, the 'mother' number would have been
very close and maybe even lower.   The album was bought in a collection from a music reviewer and I would expect the 'mother'
digits to be around '1' or '2', like so many journalists, they wrote most of them without bothering to listen to the records! If you
  also used to read the UK 1970's & 1980's music papers, that will explain why they were so inaccuarte and biased.  John Lennon
suffered from outrageously vindictive reviews in the UK music press in this very period, he was living in America but was still
still reading the British music papers and magazines, especially when his latest records were released.  He sent scathing letters
protesting against vindictive reviews, they were printed but ignored.   I have forgotten all about pressing info, the above shows
  this is the very first pressing, October, 1974.  This record's maitrix on Side 1 is over half way under the green Apple label and
Side 2 is touching the label's outer rims.  First pressings had the USA maitrix hand scribed directly underneath EMI's UK maitrix
and they were at least twice the size of EMI's machine stamped maitrix, the slim run-out grooves  account for the labels being
either that close or actually covering them.  Unlike CD's, no two records are the same and this comes down to the individuality
  of every record...even if you can't see the stamping codes or maitrixes.  Both maitrix sets clearly visible, I had so much to fit
into 12 pictures, but included both side's maitrixes in a compiled single picture, that was due to the unique format in the next
  section.
 
  'SW 23415 Z - 5' /'SW23416  Z - 6' is also scribed on either side and crossed out, they were USA maitrixes and I believe why
the 'Z5/ Z6' unusual UK endings were mistakenly allocated.  I had better make this clear, all the British first pressings have the
USA 'Z5/ Z6' maitrix endings, yes, no other Apple or EMI related  record has that, but as all first pressing of "Walls & Bridges"
do, therefore there is No rarity attached, just a useful identification point.
  FIRST ISSUE THICK CARDBOARD "Walls & Bridges" PICTURES INNER SLEEVE.
Either side is printed with different portraits of John to those on the cover or the outside of the book, they are uniquely in sepia
colours.  Typical of an early  1970's Apple/EMI type made from thick heavy duty cardboard, the top opening edges are perfectly
crisp and this has no more than the impression from first pressing's heavy vinyl. Re-issues have thin shiny inners, the shape is
  completely different as well, first editions from 1974 have square or 90 degree corners on the bottom, the top corners are at
45 degrees, re-issues from the 1980's and beyond, have curved corners.  This original 1974 inner sleeve is more like an LP cover
and actually thicker and stronger than some 1970's album covers!  Serving to support the uniquely designed cover as well, like
the record and superb book, it has not left the cover or seen the light of day since October 1974, as well as being unsplit on the
 sides and bottom centre like most are, this is barely even aged.  Both the sides are shown in the compiled pictures that show
the flaps open on both sides, I included the outside cover per side as well, allowing me to display all 6 pages in full pictures.
All to add, is the side without John's various glasses that include from the picture he drew of his school teacher, has a tiny
fleck of ink from the printing, as that is almost under the bottom edge and so tiny, I could have left including that really.
THE INNER SLEEVE IS IN UNUSED, UNSPLIT, UNFADED AND UNAGED, MINT- CONDITION.

FIRST ISSUE "Walls & Bridges" BOOK WITH 6 STAPLED PAGES.
John Lennon's word-play and an ability to draw the truth from a great sense of humour, make this essential, everything in this
book had his personal input and is the finest Lennon album insert of them all.
   
  Measuring a large 11" x 11", like the front cover the six pages contain John Lennon's Primary school paintings, at eleven years
old.  All are unused, uncreased and unaged, like the outside cover, like brand new, I cannot include the staples because all the
first issues rusted during 1974!  This is not speculation, my original was bought on the day of issue and the staples were rusted.
  Included are full album lyrics, credits and lots of Lennon written fun stuff, five colour paintings date from 1952, as kept by his
  Aunt Mimi in Liverpool, who sent to him when the idea for the artwork took root.
   THE BOOK AND ALL THE PAGES ARE IN OUTSTANDING DAY OF ISSUE, MINT CONDITION.
 
FIRST ISSUE, UNIQUE DESIGN 'Garrod & Lofthouse' COVER, TWO 'FACE CHANGING' MOVABLE/REVERSABLE FLAPS.
The cover is in equally stunning condition as the record, the front artwork has one of the eleven year old John Lennon schoolboy
painting of a football match.  Over it are two movable flaps with portions of the young John's other paintings, found in full in
  the book.  Underneath those flaps are different parts of John's face, you can reverse them on the back like a children's game.
   The back cover has a full size photo of him and the two flaps can change the face into your own choice, including covering up
the five pairs of glasses he's wearing.  The two that fit onto the cover's back picture are positively textured on first issues, so
there is a drastic variation in the colours, once again the distuinguishing feature is clearly shown in a combined picture.

A lovely novel idea for an album cover, but with average use the flaps became 'dog eared' with frayed edges and splits at the
  hinged joints. Not only are both flaps unsplit with as new, crisp, sharp edges, the rest of the cover is completely unfaded and
unscuffed.  Very rarely found because to even access the record, you have to open out the cardboard flaps, in other words, the
opening side to access or replace the record is on the left hand side of the cover, not  the conventional right side.  The edges
and the joining sections, I suppose as they create extra 90 degree cardboard meeting points,'corners' will suffice for such an
exclusive design, only have the merest brushing.  'Ruffles' is a better word for this cover, the actual corners only have the most
minimal rubbing possible for this cover.  As ever, the most awkward is on the bottom of the left side, where both movable flaps
are situated with the hinging, that has minor standing pressure and the lightest rubbing, not from use, literally from standing in
a plastic outer sleeve.

Beyond that usual tiny bunching or pressure in the corners from storage as well as assembling and gluing this difficult shaped
  cover together, there is not another blemish to detail, even grading it Near Mint is harsh, you can see by just how stunning the
cover in the pictures, including still having the album titles on the tiny 'spine', actually printed on the flap's hinging positions.
I am including the slightest hint of standing in storage for nearly 40 years, but this a genuine very first issue cover and it was
kept inside a plastic outer sleeve since first bought in October 1974.  Few still have all the printed titles on the spine, with the
two hinged flaps becoming the spine with the titles printed on a movable fold, needless to say, the handling in that position this
cover actively encouraged, very soon wore complete them away.  This superb cover has all the printing there and once again the
most minimal rubbing possible for such a fragile/movable spine, I do mean 'minimal' because this is 'near perfect.'
A REALLY BEAUTIFUL COVER, BEST DESCRIBED AS STILL HAVING THE ORIGINAL CRISP, STARCHY FEEL TO HOLD,
WITHOUT ANY AGEING AT ALL, IN NEAR MINT CONDITION.

THE RECORD WAS LEFT UNPLAYED, THE TEXTURED LABELS DO NOT HAVE ANY SPINDLE ALIGNMENT TRACES, AS I
  WRITE REGULARLY FOR UNPLAYED VINYL, THERE HAD TO BE FACTORY HANDLING.  ONLY SIDE 2 HAS FEATHER
LIGHT HANDLING, WHICH IS NEAR INVISIBLE.    I ONLY NOTICED WHEN ANGLING THE RECORD INTO TODAY'S
BRIGHT SUNSHINE TO TAKE A PICTURE, I USUALLY SAY 'FACTORY HANDLING,' BUT OFTEN TRUE MINT VINYL
HAS THE IMPRINT FROM THE METAL STAMPING DISCS.  IN THEORY THEY WERE SUPPOSED TO BE SEAMLESS
AND ULTRA SMOOTH, BUT IN REALITY THE METAL DISC ITSELF HAD 'HANDLING' TRACES AND PRESSED ONTO
THE RECORDS.  EITHER WAY, AN UNPLAYED FIRST PRESSING "Walls & Bridges" RECORD IS RARE ENOUGH NOT
NOT TO BE CONCERNED ABOUT HOW IT LEFT EMI'S PRESSING PLANT, IN THIS CASE, I KNOW IT NEVER WAS
SOLD IN A RECORD SHOP WHERE HANDLING AND PLAYING TOOK PLACE.

A STUNNING LOOOKING FIRST PRESSING, THE RECORD IS IN UNPLAYED MINT CONDITION.
SIDE 1
"Going Down on Love"
"Whatever Gets You Through The Night"
"Old Dirt Road"
"What You Got"
"Bless You"
"Scared"

SIDE 1
"#9 Dream"
"Surprise, Surprise (Sweet Bird Of Paradox)"
"Steel And Glass"
"Beef Jerky"
"Nobody Loves You (When You're Down And Out)"
"Ya Ya" *(Dorsey/Lewis/Robinson)

All songs Written By John Lennon, Except "Ya Ya,"
"Old Dirt Road" By John Lennon & Harry Nilsson.
Arranged And Produced By John Lennon.

John Lennon:
Lead & harmony vocals, lead, rhythm & acoustic guitars,
Piano, percussion & sound effects

Nicky Hopkins - piano
Ken Asher - electric piano, clavinet & mellotron
Jesse Ed Davis - lead and acoustic guitar
Klaus Voormann - bass
Bobby Keys - tenor saxophone
  Jim Keltner - drums
Arthur Jenkins - percussion

New York Phillarmonic Orchestra - strings & brass
Harry Nilson, Lori Burton & May Pang - background vocals on "9 Dream."
Elton John:
  Piano & harmony vocals on "Whatever Gets You Through the Night."
Hammond organ & harmony vocals on "Surprise, Surprise."
  In 1974 John Lennon's private life was in turmoil and even his rock solid relationship with Yoko was for the first time on rocky
  grounds.  His was still having a legal battle with the USA Government's attempts to throw him out by using the flimsiest reason,
an unjust 1968 drugs bust in England, an ever present deportation threat was like living with a sword permanently hanging over
them.  In January 1974, in desperation to shake free of his 'criminal record', John even wrote a letter to England directly to the
Queen asking her for a legal pardon.  Lennon was of course heavily into drugs in 1968, but like the Rolling Stones' Mick Jagger
and Keith Richards, they had all been planted by a policeman who would  be imprisoned for corruption charges later on.  After a
temporary split with Yoko, by the March he reverted to his wildest teenage years to embark on a drunken Los Angeles lifestyle
with the likes of the Who's Keith Moon & Harry Nilsson. A relationship began with former personal assistant May Pang, that was
at the suggestion and the full approval from Yoko, she sensed it was time to curb his restlessness and burn off the reckless side
of his character.  His peace campaign was put on hold as he entered into the darkest period of his life and with the media waiting
to report any ex-Beatles activity, he became an easy target. There was an infamous incident happened in L.A.'s Troubadour Club
  that illustrates why Lennon called most of 1974, 'his lost weekend.'  A very drunk Lennon with a tampon taped to his head hurled
  insults at the Smothers Brothers while they were performing, an argument broke out with their now angry manager, John Lennon
  punched him and for good measure, a cocktail waitress who had tried to intervene as well. Pictures of him being forcibly removed
  from the club with Harry Nillson made headlines in the worldwide media, this was more like a teenage Lennon roaming the street
  of Liverpool or Hamburg, John's life however centred around his music and he now even had major problems there.
  
  The previously projected album's tapes intended for 1974, were not in his hands, the 1973 recordings for the"Rock & Roll" album
  had been made with a crazed Phil Spector who now refused to give John the tapes, Spector even aimed a gun at him when he went
  round to his home and demanded  Spector handed them over.  As a solo artist John had never experienced having a finished album
  left unreleased, it would be another near two years before "Rock & Roll" could be released in 1975, so there was a huge gap to be
filled this early in '74.  Now John had to write a complete set of songs for a new album, in place of an intended "Rock & Roll" LP,
  perhaps if less stressed he would have had some of the usual home demo's to fall back on, but only one new song had been written
  at this point, appropriately,"Nobody Loves You When You're Down & Out".  Strangely it was the same situation that happened to the
  Beatles only five years earlier in 1969,"Let It Be" was left unreleased and "Abbey Road" was begun instead. This time though John
  did not have Paul,George and Ringo to contribute, plus the songs for "Abbey Road" had mostly been written during the"Let It Be"
  sessions anyway.
  
Both labels are in pristine, brand new condition, even the single spindle trace of that one play is so faint, it could have easily
been missed.  In the pictures you will see both labels looking like new and the record has the special glossy sheen of mint vinyl
  without any of the usual mass of scratches and the deep marks associated with this album's excessive playing.  Most copies in
presentable condition are from the ealy 1980's made after John's murder, every single item here is 100% authentic to 1974.
I decided to take one of my undectable, extremely careful play, nothing to do with a feather light factory finish, I love this LP
  and relish describing what in effect, became John lennon's final new studio album before 'retiring', but also without Yoko's input
as found on his comeback albums.  "Double Fantasy" and "Milk & Honey" had John and Yoko sharing alternating tracks, just like
their 1972 " Sometime In New York City," technically, "Rock & Roll" followed one year later but it was not really a 1975 album.
I know these 1974 first pressings inside out,an unplayed true Mint record will have immaculate sound, as stunning as the visual
appearance, even on the first play in 39 years, I am confident the perfection of the pressing will include absolutely minimal
static during the music and in the track gaps.
 
The maitrix ending's on "Walls & Bridges," are the strangest ever found on any EMI record, the only  possible explanation for why
    that happened was mentioned in my headings but I will discuss it again here.  This is now late April 2013 and I have not listed
"Walls & Bridges" since last year, so I am enjoying the opportunity to include all the pressing details and also looking forward
to describing the tracks next.  The vast majority of the first UK pressings have the standard pre-fix of, 'YEX 937 / YEX 938', the
endings have 'Z5 / Z6'.  They are the USA Apple maitrix endings,there are also the USA maitrix's scribed in the run-out grooves,
they were crossed out with a single line through them.  I believe it was an error at the pressing plant for the first issues, as I
said just now, a very first pressing by this virtue of having '1' digit on one side for the stamping disc or 'mother', not that I
  need to look at them to identify a first issue John Lennon album!   In the 1970's EMI began including European maitrix's and were
aboutto introduce the USA catalogue numbers on covers and inner sleeves where applicable, but not in full measure until after the
end of the 1970's decade for the beginning  of the 1980's.  I do not believe EMI/Apple intended changing the standard maitrix
endings though, that never happened even in the 1990's.  Unifying the British maitrix' with worldwide Apple / EMI records was
something that was not considered, I can only guess it was human error as usual that accounts for "Walls & Bridges." I have never
seen any other EMI related pressing end with a digit and then 'Z'.

I have taken great care to align the centre hole to my spindle , very gradually lowered my stylus into virgin vinyl, as expected,
Side 1 has near silent run-in grooves, the intro to the magnificent "Going Down On Love" only has John's vocals and very light
percussion, normally suffering from loud crackles and severe noise.  Not only is that ultra clean and clear of any surface sound,
the entire track is in absolutely stunning audio perfection, containing the very special sound unique to Lennon when he was fully
focused on creating an album of true greatness.  John spoke in great detail about the 'sound' he achieved for "Walls & Bridges"
during a really positive and personally active round of many promotional appearances and interviews in 1974, he was extremely
proud of the  finished item. Quite rightly, even by his perfectionist standards, only a Mint first pressing has the very sound of
the finished master tapes, the lyrics were directly related to his experiences leading up to making the album, autobiographical,
with no more telling a line than this one;
"Somebody please, please help me, you know I'm drowning in a sea of hatred".
This is far from being a moroffer song, a very bright and full production for the superb melody, "Going Down On Love" became the
  obvious choice for a great album opening track.   Unlike on the previous 1973 LP, "Mind Games", John used the stereo in all it's
glory, with the most stunning true stereo channel separation.  Followed by an exceptionally silent link into John's collaboration
with Elton John, "Whatever Gets You Through The Night."  It earned them a No.1 single in the USA, but surprisingly failed to rise
  above No.36 in the UK.  The sound is mega sharp with the percussion really leaping out from the speakers, including outstanding
audio definition on the vocals.  It was the same period John worked with David Bowie on "Fame," maybe missing a partnership with
  Paul or George for the vocal harmonies. Both voices here blended together perfectly, particularly the highly infectious chorus,
geat to hear in such fantastic clarity.  I cannot get into my normal flow of recording details, a Mint record will only be played
  once more after establishing an immaculate pressing, I will pick longer tracks to add some more background.  A faded-out ending
into more of those perfectly smooth linking grooves, the beautiful "Old Dirt Road" has a perfectly clean intro.  It has to be one
of John's greatest ever songs, the deeply beautiful melody equates with anything he wrote in the 60's with the Beatles, wonderful
lyrics are sheer poetry.  There's so much sadness in the song, reflecting John's lonely life without Yoko, ironically a promise to
Elton John that re-united them.  John was never keen on playing live after the Beatles experience's but Elton was so convinced
"Whatever Gets You Through The Night" would become a No.1 single, thinking it would not be, John promised to play live with Elton
  if it hit the Top. True to his promise, he joined Elton on stage, Yoko was in the audience watching, they got together that night,
  the 'lost weekend' was finally over.  The sound for a very gentle and delicate track is just stunning, playing in perfect audio
clarity, there is virtually no surface/pressing sound even on such a fragile backing as this. The strings are panned in the right
  speaker with the piano, John's acoustic guitar is placed left, a lovely effect. The next gap is once more problem free, I report
them but often I can't help seeing the crazy side of expecting the gaps to act like a CD banding, I will continue including them.
  The next track very powerfully kicks in, the stereo mix here is just awesome, Lennon's painful lyrics are self explanitory but not
the title.  "What You Got" refers to how you never realise or appreciate what you have until you've lost it, not by any means as
  sad as the lyrics suggest, a great funky track bursting with electrifying energy, and what an outstanding vocal! John's electric
  guitar riff is along the lines of the one he played on the just mentioned David Bowie single, "Fame".   A very loud powerful song
in absolutely perfect sound quality.  Then a silent entrance for the gentle sounds of "Bless You," for the intro to be this clean
without any of the usual crackles, is something rarely found on first issues, this is a record that escaped the normal punishment
the first issues were subjected to.  Then the great albums were usually heavily played due to having instantly re-playable music,
the pressing deserves the highest praise.  If not quite 60's massively thick vinyl though, the year of release has to always be
  taken into account when I am sound grading even a Mint copy.  As I wrote that, the track fades out into silence!  I would never
sell this much loved LP in anything less than as close to audio perfection as I'm currently enjoying, I have rejected many copies
  intended for selling over long years spent as a record seller.  This track is an example why, "I'm Scared" is one of my all time
favourite Lennon songs and vocal performances.  John's lack of prepared material for this album had him digging deep down inside,
  as usual he came out writing songs of an intensively personal nature. The brutal honesty of the lyrics on this amazing track were
typical of the man, baring his soul in a song.  A completely exposed intro, with John almost whispering,"Take a listen", then a
wolf lets out a very long mournful cry.  To hear this intro with out any form of surface sound is really remarkable, I am not one
to make excuses for vinyl, it can only ever be today how it was pressed in 1974.  Apart from my fanaticism about all Lennon's
  records, Mint vinyl alone allows me to make such positive statements, grading has to include audio perfection even for such a
  fantasticc appearance.  I only accept the razor sharp music being heard right now, shame so few record seller feel the same, a
haunting melody and anguished lyrics are sung with such heartfelt passion and every range of emotions, matching and maybe even
  surpassing anything John had previously recorded. When he sings this verse, you can actually feel the pain pouring out;
 
"Hatred and jealousy are gonna be the death of me,
I knew it right from the start,
Sing out about love and peace,
Don't want to see the red raw meat....."
  It was obviously referring to the loneliness without Yoko but without knowing it was also prophesising a date with destiny outside
  the Dakota building.  It was not John's inactivity between 1975 & 1980 that fed illusions of that madman, it was all his years of
  public appearances and either speaking out or singing out about love and peace.  The simply stunning production here makes it an
  overpowering song to hear, the sound quality is superb, this record has such superb definition for the instruments, in particular
John's vocals sound just breathtaking. The brass emphasies the down on the floor, blues/soul/r&b feel, he was very influenced by
  this style of music from his young teenage years, only in 1974 he was performing "I'm Scared" for real.
Side 2 has silent run-in grooves without the slightestst static, an unplayed Mint record really is a joy to listen to, especially
   a perfectly clear intro to a John Lennon song, vocal performance and production that is positively an equal to any of John's 60's
   Beatles  tracks bar none, the staggering "# 9 Dream". A fantastic truly magical track with a deeply beautiful melody, the lyrics
  were an actual event he experienced in a dream, John heard the full melody and lyrics while he was asleep and the minute he woke
  up, he grabbed a pen and pad and scribbled down the words still resounding inside his head, the melody was unforgettable enough!
That is a true story, as told by one of the most honest and humble artists to be blessed with such genius, anyone else would have
claimed to have written it while playing a piano or a guitar.  The stereo panning on the many textured and layered sound effects
   is just awesome!  He had dropped the 'back to mono' campaign he and Phil Spector were conducting, when John positively turned to
   true stereo, your ears were in for a major treat!  The sound itself here is just staggering, in the most perfect, razor sharp audio
definition you could hope to hear, that includes any other medium of hearing music from.  For me "# 9 Dream" is just as great as
  "Strawberry Fields Forever", so many Beatles collector's shun all their solo albums, I urge anyone of that persuasion to at least
hear John's personally constructed stereo mix of"# 9 Dream" from a first pressing, then discover the wealth of other recordings
that compliment, extend and broaden the music on the Beatles albums. Next, check out Paul & George's solo albums, you will not be
disappointed, Lennon was an artist so involved with the finished sound of his records, only from first pressings can get to hear
his own intended mix and sound.   Forget the terrible CD's sound, the sound textures from top condition vinyl sound incredible on
"# 9 Dream" and not only is this a truly inspired and beautiful John Lennon melody, these are among John's finest ever lyrics.
  You have the full range of human emotions on "Walls And Bridges", the blues/ r&b, down on the floor of "I'm Scared" finished
  the first side, John chose this track deliberately and 'Lennon the dreamer' singing about 'music touching my soul', is how we
  should always remember him.  The first linking grooves on this side, glide smoothly and silently into Lennon's very emphatic and
  extremely powerful electric guitar intro into another truly inspired composition,"Surprise, Surprise (Sweet Bird Of Paradox)."
   An up-tempo, very happy and such a positive song, is propelled along by the buoyant backing and with a vocal from a man inspired
  like never before, after the fantastic vocal harmonies of "# 9 Dream" this is sung with a more gritty voice.  Using his favourite
  60's recording Beatles method of double tracking on his vocals, it dispensed with other voices to supply the harmonies.  The song
   gradually fades  away at the end, John improvises and I'm sure it was unintentional but he finishes with a near identical piece
  to the "beep, beep" on the chorus of "Rubber Soul" LP's opening track,"Drive My Car." The great songs just keep on coming, next a
  a vicious put-down to end all others,"Steel And Glass".  John turns his full scorn onto Allen Klein, a hustler from New York who
  had convinced John he would be the one sort out the mess the Beatles finances were in back in 1970.  Paul saw straight through
  Klein and wanted him out, John initially liked his blunt way of talking and placed his full trust in him.  Although not directly
  named, the lyrics tear into Allen Klein with one of those sneering Lennon vocals, John called it 'The son of "How Do You Sleep".'
  Beginning like a folk song, with a faded up gently played acoustic guitar and that knowing chuckle from John, then the spoken
  introduction, all was heard without virtually any static but positively no surface sound/ needle noise at all.  A wounded Lennon
  hit back for misleading him and received the full Lennon venom, with even the "Imagine" LP's production style of droning strings
  playing the counter melody.  John's vocal is once again just awesome, holding and stretching out the notes on the last word of
  the verse, here's just a sample of the many killer lines here;
"Your teeth are clean but your mind is capped,
  You leave your smell like an alley cat."
  I'm constantly praising the sound on the record but this track really does have such incredible audio!  Next, "Beef Jerky" has a
full on funky soul feel, an instrumental based on a brilliant Lennon guitar riff.  I was thinking back  for another instrumental
  track on a Lennon solo LP and realised there was not another one, "Beef Jerky" has a few short vocal chants from whom I assume
  were Lori Burton and May Pang,  it is indeed the only instrumental found on a John Lennon album.  An outstanding production with
  powerful Stax style brass and fantastic percussion, the track was played flat out! This was no album filler but an example of how
  John would write on either an acoustic or an electric guitar, or with a piano. "Beef Jerky" was written on an electric guitar and
  what a riff he discovered!   If anyone wonders how I know all these details, my extensive collection of everything John Lennon
  ever recorded officially and unofficially, was put together over the last 50 years years, including anything that was taped live,
  comprehensive demo's and studio out-takes, not to mention a large amount of interviews, many lost now.  Pointing a mike at a
  radio or TV began back in the early 60's, first on my brother's reel-to-reel then the wonders of the cassette tape, I still have
  those as well.  The song I said was the only pre-written before work on the album began in earnest, was given pride of place as
  the grand finalé, "Nobody Loves You When You're Down And Out".  A slow, majestic and very mood intensive Lennon blues song,
  written in the very depths of depression about the situations he found himself in '74.  Such brutal honesty once again, his vocal
  was sung with all of the emotional despair and anguish of the blues greats, almost painful to listen to if you concentrate only
  on the vocals and lyrics, this is music so real, even the last 37 years spent playing this does not lessen such a massive impact.
An amazing  demo version sung with just the basics of a piano backing the voice is on the rare "Menlove Avenue" LP, this superb
version has the song expanded but the glorious production does not mask the same brutal honesty only a voice and a piano create.
The track has awesome sound quality and the album finishes with a very short rendition of the rock & roll classic "Ya Ya",  John had
to slow down the tempo to a crawl because his son Julian, who was then very young at eleven, was playing the drums.
  {Roy}
  R & M RECORDS. My lifetime's love of music and records began at a very young age, the arrival of the Beatles and the 1960's decade
  in general had a very profound effect. It was only natural to bring all my first hand experience of collecting vinyl
  into becoming a professional record seller.  Over twenty years ago now we entered into the wonderful atmosphere
of record fairs with the highest possible standards set. When the Internet became the world's new market place for
  vinyl, in 2001 it was time to join . Those standards were rigidly adhered to as they will always continue to be,
the basics of honesty and integrity were very much part of the era the music I love originated in, so here is our friendly
and very efficient service we are proud to provide;

EVERY RECORD IS FULLY PLAYED AND COMES WITH A 'NO ARGUMENT' MONEY BACK GUARANTEE.
  I USE GOOD OLD COMMON SENSE AS WELL AS A GLOBALLY ACCEPTED GRADING TERMINOLOGY
  FROM THE U.K. "RECORD COLLECTOR PRICE GUIDE" BOOK.
THERE IT CLEARLY STATES "Sound Quality" AFFECTS EVERY GRADING LEVEL AND THAT IS THE ONE
AND ONLY POSSIBLE WAY TO ACCURATELY GRADE RECORDS. i.e. COMBINING A STRICT VISUAL
INSPECTION WITH VERY CLOSELY LISTENING TO EVERY SECOND, UNLESS PERHAPS IN THE CASE
OF GENUINELY UNPLAYED VINYL.  EVEN THEN WE STILL TAKE FULL RESPONSIBITY FOR A RECORD
WHEN A CUSTOMER RECEIVES EITHER A SEALED OR AN UNPLAYED RECORD.
  MY DESCRIPTIONS WILL ALWAYS BE 100% HONEST AND TOTALLY ACCURATE ON ALL GRADINGS
FROM 'V.G.' ( VERY GOOD), TO THE ULTIMATE 'MINT' CONDITION.
ANY QUESTIONS ON OUR ITEMS ARE WELCOMED AND WILL BE PROMPTLY REPLIED TO.
  WE ARE FULLY EXPERIENCED AT SHIPPING WORLDWIDE AND NO EFFORT IS SPARED TO PROTECT
RECORDS AND COVERS ETC.  WE WELCOME buyers FROM ANY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD.

ALL RECORDS ARE REMOVED FROM THEIR SLEEVES AND PLACED INTO NEW PROTECTIVE CARD
SLEEVES AND THEN PLACED INTO NEW, HEAVYWEIGHT PLASTIC OUTER SLEEVES.
THE GREATEST ATTENTION IS PAID TO MAKING THE PACKAGING EXTREMELY STRONG & SECURE.
EVERY POSSIBLE EFFORT IS MADE TO ENSURE A SAFE DELIVERY AND WE ONLY USE THE VERY BEST
QUALITY PACKAGING MATERIALS, THE COST OF THE ITEM IS IMMATERIAL, EVERY RECORD IS
TREATED EXACTLY THE SAME.

WE DO NOT TREAT POSTAGE AS A MONEY MAKING PROJECT, POSTAGE IS LESS THAN COST, USING
ONLY PROFESSIONALLY PACKED BOXES WITH SUBSTANTIAL PROTECTIVE PACKAGING THAT DOES
WEIGH A LITTLE EXTRA.

UNDER PAYPAL & 'S GUIDELINES, ALL RECORDS WILL BE SENT VIA A FULLY INSURED TRACKABLE
SERVICE.
We have kept all our charges at the same level for years now, but due to the Post Office's new price increases, regretfully we
will have to increase the cost of LP's, however, singles will remain unchanged.   were aware of that happening and have
  increased their minimum postal cost for LP's to & £7.00, that figure has been enforced by the UK Post Office and it will become
our UK First Class, Recorded Delivery cost for albums up to the value of £46.  
For LP's valued above £46, the cost will be £9, we are unhappy about either increase but our high standard of packaging has meant
in 12 years of trading, there has not been one item damaged, we are determined to maintain that in the present and future.

IN THE UK RECORDS UP TO THE VALUE OF £46 WILL BE SENT RECORDED DELIVERY, OVER £46 WILL BE
SENT SPECIAL DELIVERY.
  FOR THE REST OF THE WORLD ALL RECORDS WILL BE SENT VIA 'INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR.'

POSTAGE  COST FOR LP's
UK: UP TO VALUE OF £46, FIRST CLASS RECORDED DELIVERY  £7.00
UK: OVER VALUE OF £46, FULLY INSURED SPECIAL DELIVERY £9.00
EUROPE: FULLY INSURED VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR  £15.00
USA,JAPAN & REST OF THE WORLD FULLY INSURED VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £20.00
POSTAGE COST FOR EP's & 7"
UK: UP TO THE VALUE OF £46 FIRST CLASS RECORDED DELIVERY £3.00
UK: OVER THE VALUE OF £46 FULLY INSURED SPECIAL DELIVERY £6.00
EUROPE: AIR MAIL VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £10.00
USA, JAPAN ETC. AIRMAIL VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £12.00
PAYMENT DETAILS. WE WILL SEND ALL WINNING buyers AN INVOICE WITH THE FULL PAYMENT AND POSTAL DETAILS,
AS NEAR TO THE sale ENDING AS POSSIBLE.

OUR AIM IS TO MAKE YOUR PURCHASE SMOOTH AND TROUBLE FREE.
FOR UK BUYERS; WE ACCEPT:  PAYPAL, CHEQUES, POSTAL ORDERS & BANK WIRES.
FOR OVERSEAS BUYERS; WE ACCEPT:  PAYPAL, INTERNATIONAL MONEY ORDERS IN POUNDS STERLING ONLY.
OR BANK TO BANK WIRE TRANSFERS.

WE WILL NOT MAKE FALSE STATEMENTS ON CUSTOMS DECLARATION FORMS AND WILL ALWAYS
CONDUCT ALL OF OUR BUSINESS WITH TOTAL HONESTY.
AS MUCH AS WE SYMPATHISE WITH THE WAY SOME COUNTRIES CHARGE SUCH HEAVY IMPORT
DUTIES, WE WILL NOT LIE.
  Pay me with PayPal. I don't charge my buyers extra!

John Lennon Walls & Bridges Lp, Authentic Very 1st Uk Press 1974, Unplayed Mint:
$151

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