Krempe & Rendsburg Germany 1582 Braun & Hogenberg Unusual Antique Engraved View


Krempe & Rendsburg Germany 1582 Braun & Hogenberg Unusual Antique Engraved View

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Krempe & Rendsburg Germany 1582 Braun & Hogenberg Unusual Antique Engraved View:
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KREMPE & RENDSBURG GERMANY 1582 BRAUN & HOGENBERG UNUSUAL ANTIQUE ENGRAVED VIEW KREMPE & RENDSBURG GERMANY 1582 BRAUN & HOGENBERG UNUSUAL ANTIQUE ENGRAVED VIEW Description

Crempa Holsatie Opp. Ioannis Ranzovii Equitis Aurati Industria Munitiss. == Crempa. // Rendesburga, venustum Holsatiae Oppidum Eidora fluvio circundatum. == Reinholdsburga.

 


KREMPE
 
TRANSLATION OF CARTOUCHE TEXT: Krempe, at the instigation of Joannes Rantzau, Knight of the Golden Helm, a heavily Holstein town.
 
COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Krempe, a town in Holstein, derives its name from the heavily travelled waters that flow through the midst of it to the Rivers Stör and Elbe. It was incorporated as a city and granted its coat of arms in 1271 by Gerhard, first Count of Schauenburg and Holstein. In 1535, during the Count's War, it was fortified by the knight Johannes Rantzau with moated ramparts and bastions and is now not the least of the Holstein fortifications. Its inhabitants are merchants for the most part, but they also engage in farming."
 
Looking from the north, the viewer sees a town mentioned for the first time in 1240, made a free city in 1250 and fortified in the 16th century.The huddle of patrician town-house gables is topped only by the church of St Peter and the magnificent town hall (Curia), attesting to the heyday of this trading centre from the 13th to the 16th century. By the time this work went to print ships from Krempe were sailing as far as to the Mediterranean and even to Arkhangelsk on the White Sea and Krempe merchants had opened trading posts in England, France and Portugal. The founding of Glückstadt put paid to the town's prosperity. To add insult to injury the Au silted up - by 1696 Krempe was bankrupt. Plagues, wars and enforced levies did the rest, leaving the city to sink into the somnolence of a rural backwater.
 
RENDSBURG
 
CARTOUCHE: Rendsburg, a fine town in Holstein, encircled by the River Eider.
 
COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "The city is situated in a highly advantageous location. Indeed the River Eider flows all round it and through it with so many bends that one can board a ship there and sail for Spain, France, England and the Netherlands. The tower, which is still visible today next to the castle, was built by Gerhard the Great, Count of Holstein and Schauenburg, in 1230. Afterwards it was sold to the Kings of Denmark, had the existing fortifications erected."
 
Viewed from the north and a slightly elevated vantage point, the town is situated on an island in the River Eider and fortified with earthworks. The church of St Mary, the first Gothic hall church built in Holstein, and the 16th-century town hall are easy to pick out at the centre of the island. The three-masted ships in the background indicate far-flung North Sea and Baltic trade links. Rendsburg, which is first mentioned in 1199 and was made a free city in 1252/53, began as a settlement on a ford over the Eider marking the border between Schleswig and Holstein and was defended by the Reinholdsburg, a 12th-century border fortress that was converted into a Renaissance palace in the late 16th century. Construction of the North Sea-Baltic Canal in 1887-1895 made the water-level sink by 2 m so that nothing indicate today that Rendsburg was once on an island.
 
Source: Georg Braun and Franz Hogenberg. Civitates Orbis Terrarum. 1572-1617.
 
The first volume of the Civitates Orbis Terrarum was published in Cologne in 1572. The sixth and the final volume appeared in 1617.
 
This great city atlas, edited by Georg Braun and largely engraved by Franz Hogenberg, eventually contained 546 prospects, bird-eye views and map views of cities from all over the world. Braun (1541-1622), a cleric of Cologne, was the principal editor of the work, and was greatly assisted in his project by the close, and continued interest of Abraham Ortelius, whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was, as a systematic and comprehensive collection of maps of uniform style, the first true atlas.
 
The Civitates, indeed, was intended as a companion for the Theatrum, as indicated by the similarity in the titles and by contemporary references regarding the complementary nature of two works. Nevertheless, the Civitates was designs to be more popular in approach, no doubt because the novelty of a collection of city plans and views represented a more hazardous commercial undertaking than a world atlas, for which there had been a number of successful precedents. Franz Hogenberg (1535-1590) was the son of a Munich engraves who settled in Malines. He engraved most of the plates for Ortelius's Theatrum and the majority of those in the Civitates, and may have been responsible for originating the project.
 
Over a hundred of different artists and cartographers, the most significant of whom was Antwerp artist Georg (Joris) Hoefnagel (1542-1600), engraved the cooper-plates of the Civitates from drawings. He not only contributed most of the original material for the Spanish and Italian towns but also reworked and modified those of other contributors. After Hoefnagel's death his son Jakob continued the work for the Civitates. A large number of Jacob van Deventer (1505-1575), also known as Jacob Roelofszof, unpublished works, plans of towns of the Netherlands were copied, as were Stumpf's woodcuts from the Schweizer Chronik of 1548, and Munster's German views from the 1550 and 1572 editions of his Cosmographia. Another important source for maps was the Danish cartographer Heinrich van Rantzau (1526-1599), beter known under his Latin name Rantzovius, who provided maps of Northern Europe, specially of Danish cities. The Civitates provided a uniquely comprehensive view of urban life at the turn of the sixteenth century. Other sources were the maps of Sebastian Munster from around 1550 and , and of.
 
Braun added to the maps figures in local dress. This feature was anticipated in Hans Lautensack's etched view of Nuremberg, 1552, those groups of citizens in the rural foreground add further authenticity to the highly accurate topographical details of what was effectively Germany's cultural capital at that time. Braun's motives for adding figures to the views, however, went further: as stated in his introduction to book 1, he believed, perhaps optimistically, that his plans would not in consequence be scrutinized for military secrets by the Turks, as their religion forbade them from looking on representations of the human form.
 
The plans, each accompanies by Braun's printed account of the town's history, situation and commerce, form an armchair traveler's compendium, which the scholar Robert Burton in The Anatomy of Melancholy of 1621 asserted would not only provide instructions but would uplift the spirit as well.

Date: 1582 ( undated )


Condition: Very strong and dark impression on good paper. Paper with chains. Map old original colored. Wide margins. Small foxing. Paper with browning. Small warming. Map folded. Conditions are as you can see in the images.

Mapmakers: Georg Braun (also Brunus, Bruin; 1541 – 10 March 1622) was a topo-geographer. From 1572 to 1617 he edited the Civitates orbis terrarum, which contains 546 prospects, bird's-eye views and maps of cities from all around the world. He was the principal editor of the work, he acquired the tables, hired the artists, and wrote the texts. He died as an octogenarian in 1622, as the only survivor of the original team to witness the publication of volume VI in 1617.
 
Braun was born and died in Cologne. His principal profession was as a Catholic cleric, however, he spent thirty-seven years as canon and dean at the church, St. Maria ad Gradus, in Cologne. His six-volume work was inspired by Sebastian Münster's Cosmographia. In form and layout it resembles the 1570 Theatrum orbis terrarum by Abraham Ortelius, as Ortelius was interested in a complementary companion for the Theatrum.
 
The Braun publication set new standards in cartography for over 100 years. Frans Hogenberg (1535–1590, from Mechelen) created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were Joris Hoefnagel, Jacob Hoefnagel, cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Primarily European cities are depicted in the publication; however, Casablanca and Mexico City/Cuzco on one sheet[4] are also included in volume I.
 
Frans Hogenberg (1535–1590) was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker.
 
Hogenberg was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg. In 1568 he was banned from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. He is known for portraits and topographical views as well as historical allegories. He also produced scenes of contemporary historical events.
 
Hogenberg died in Cologne.
 

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Krempe & Rendsburg Germany 1582 Braun & Hogenberg Unusual Antique Engraved View:
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