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Liddell Hart T E Lawrence In Arabia & After Feisal Arab Revolt Syria Hejaz Aqaba For Sale

Liddell Hart T E Lawrence In Arabia & After Feisal Arab Revolt Syria Hejaz Aqaba



‘T. E. Lawrence’

In Arabia and After


by

Basil Liddell Hart



This is the 1940 Edition, though in well-used condition and with a missing frontispiece

“In his preface, Basil Liddell Hart explains that while it had been his original intention to write a history of the Arab Revolt (in which Lawrence would play a large part), as his study progressed and deepened, the picture changed and he realised that had it not been for Lawrence, the Arab Revolt would have remained merely a collection of slight almost fleeting incidents. Because of him, it had an important bearing on the course of events further afield and on the course of warfare itself. It was for this reason that he was compelled to rethink his original aims and the book became a study of Lawrence himself.”



Front cover and spine

Further images of this book are shown below





Publisher and place of publication Dimensions in inches (to the nearest quarter-inch) London: Jonathan Cape 5¾ inches wide x 9 inches tall Edition Length September 1940 [first published in 1934] 491pages Condition of covers Internal condition Original green cloth blocked in silver. The covers are worn and soiled, being quite heavily scuffed and with some staining, including some ink stains on the rear cover. The spine ends and corners are heavily bumped. The images below give a good indication of the current state of the covers. The Half-Title page and frontispiece are both missing and there is a previous owner's name inscribed (Sapper E. A. Ellis, Number 1870637) on the rear of the front free end-paper (please see the image below). The first few pages are marked and grubby. The front inner hinge is cracked at the Title-Page. Page 157 is torn in the margin. The edge of the text block is foxed. There is a noticeable musty smell. Dust-jacket present? Other comments No Overall, this is a worn and well-used example, with a missing frontispiece and musty smell; however, in its defence, the text is quite clean throughout. Illustrations, maps, etc Contents Please see below for details, but please note that the frontispiece illustration is missing. Please see below for details Post & shipping information Payment options The packed weight is approximately 1000 grams.


Full shipping/postage information is provided in a panel at the end of this listing.

Payment options :
  • UK buyers: cheque (in GBP), debit card, credit card (Visa, MasterCard but not Amex), PayPal
  • International buyers: credit card (Visa, MasterCard but not Amex), PayPal

Full payment information is provided in a panel at the end of this listing.





‘T. E. Lawrence’

In Arabia and After

Contents

Preface

Book One

Personal Prologue

1. The Crusader

Book Two

Historical Prologue

I. The Sick Man

II. The Life-Line

III. The Undercurrent

Book Three

The Arab Revolt

Introduction

I. The Tocsin Rings

II. Men or a Man

III. The Wedge

IV. Spreading Ripples

V. Martial Reveries

VI. Spreading the Infection

VII. Strategy Fulfilled

VIII. A New Horizon

IX. Securing the Base

X. Leverage on Palestine

XI. A Regular Campaign

XII. More and More Regular

XIII. The Final Stroke-Preparation

XIV. The Final Stroke-Execution

XV. The Road to Damascus

Book Four

After

I. Troubles of a Man with a Conscience

II. The Seven Pillars of Wisdom

III. Fulfilment

IV Postscript
The Man of Reflection
The Man of Action
The Message
Index

MAPS


The Near And Middle East

Hejaz Railway
Arabia, Syria And Mesopotamia

The Hejaz

Northern Theatre

Aqaba-Ma'An Zone

Amman-Deraa Zone

Battle of Tafila

Palestine Campaign

ILLUSTRATIONS

'T. E.' From A Photograph By Howard Coster [MISSING]
Feisal's Army Coming Back Into Yanbo. December, 1916

The Triumphal Entry Into Aqaba. July, 1917
Railway Raiding Party: Newcombe on Left; Hornby on Right

Lawrence Amid The Results Of A Raid

The 'Blue Mist' In Wadi Ithm

Lawrence's 'Ghazala', And Foal

'Tulips' Exploding On The Railway Near Deraa
Ja'Far Pasha And Sherif Nasir At Shobek
Lawrence At Aqaba
Azraq
Lawrence On Arrival At Damascus

'T.E.' At Power Boat Yard. June, 1934





‘T. E. Lawrence’

In Arabia and After

Chapter IX
SECURING THE BASE

August — September, 1917
Lawrence's persuasion secures the transfer of Feisal's forces to Aqaba, for operations in the north as Allenby's mobile wing - Liquid funds - The Turkish threat to Aqaba is paralysed by pricks - Lawrence begins to operate against the railway


Lawrence's first definite proposal towards the new campaign was that Wejh should be abandoned, and Feisal's whole force transferred to Aqaba. When the authorities in Cairo hesitated before this bold suggestion, Lawrence increased its boldness, urging the withdrawal from the Yanbo-Medina area of all the stores and money that were being used to sustain the operations of Ali and Abdulla. While Feisal was at Aqaba far up the flank of the Hejaz railway, and Allenby was before Gaza threatening an advance into Palestine, the Turks were not likely to strengthen the garrison of Medina. The important thing was to prevent them weakening it, and trying to withdraw their forces northward. A little encouragement, through a further slackening of effort in the south, might aid this purpose without involving any serious danger to the Arabs in the Hejaz.

Here, however, Lawrence was donning the mantle of Robertson and pressing a military theory beyond the limits of political expediency. But the stiffening of opposition to this further suggestion brought with it a relaxation of caution towards his first. Thus Lawrence's political instinct was justified, and he promptly exploited the weakening.

Aqaba was only 130 miles from the British position at the Wadi Ghazze, whereas it was 700 miles from Mecca. He suggested that, as a logical consequence, Feisal's force should be transferred from Hussein's sphere of control to Allenby's and become an autonomous army with Feisal its commander, under Allenby's supreme command. Their future lines of operation ran in the same direction.

Before this proposal could be adopted, three potential human obstacles had to be overcome — Feisal, Wingate, and Hussein. Lawrence was able to give the assurance that Feisal would accept — they had talked this matter over in Wejh months before. Would Wingate hand over to another the care of the now sturdy infant he had done so much to nurse? Clayton sounded him; he found him willing to see the larger issue and relinquish Feisal's force for Allenby's use. Thus of the possible obstacles, only Hussein remained. Lawrence offered to go down and persuade him.

The Duffer in had just returned from Aqaba, and she was ordered to carry Lawrence to Jidda. On the way she called at Wejh; here he disembarked and travelled by aeroplane to Jeida, a hundred miles distant, the advanced base to which Feisal's army had moved early in July in order to operate more effectively against the railway. The air way of travel was a pleasantly quick contrast to his last inland ride in this region, and on arrival at Jeida it was a joy to meet again his old comrades, themselves now crowned with the laurels of many successful railway raids. From him they heard fragments of his experiences in the north, and from them he gathered news of what had happened in the past three months.

On the debit side was the detachment of the Billi from the Sherifian cause. Early in May their Sheikh had joined the Turks at El Ala with four hundred of his men, and although he evaded their invitation to attack Feisal, he induced his brother to leave Feisal's army, bringing away his men and the arms with which they had been supplied. Another accession to the Turkish side, more notable than really influential, was Ibn Rashid, the Emir of Hail. His arrival, indeed, was the sequel to a disaster; for in April, when conveying a large convoy of supplies to the Turks in Medina, he had been trapped and routed by Zeid near Hanakiye, eighty miles north-east of Medina. Zeid had captured three thousand richly laden camels, a similar number of sheep, four mountain guns, and two hundred and fifty prisoners, mostly Turks. This was one of the most important coups of the Hejaz war, and the gain far outweighed the fact that Ibn Rashid himself with about a thousand followers had then joined the Turks at Medain Saleh. His chief effect was to impose an extra strain on their limited supplies.

In the raids on the railway that hampered its working the handful of British officers had continued to play the foremost part. The Arabs, indeed, regarded them as exhausting allies and complained — 'Newcombe is like fire; he burns friend and enemy.' And Lawrence, who had strategic reasons for wishing that Newcombe would not press too hard on the railway, remarks that he did four times as much as any other Englishman would have done and ten times as much as the Arabs thought necessary! Their passive resistance had played a part in baulking the original British intention of severing the railway completely, although the Turks had also taken a shrewd step to frustrate a strong concentration of effort — by filling in the wells within reach of their main stations. In the middle of May Newcombe had made several breaks around Muadhdham, between Medain Saleh and Tebuk, slipping away before the forces from these stations could close upon him. He reported that the repairs were being made with old rails, which showed how the Turks were being hit in their weak side — the material side. In July Newcombe and Davenport made a large scale raid, with marked success, on a long section of the line near Qal'at Zamrud, 140 miles north of Medina, while the Arabs captured the station immediately above it. Joyce carried out a series of raids further south around Toweira with a mixed force of Egyptian, French Algerian, and Arab troops, destroying thousands of rails and several large culverts.

Feisal, however, had moved to Jeida without enthusiasm, under pressure from Wilson and Abdulla. His thoughts wandered ever to the north, to Aqaba and to Syria. Thus he welcomed with delight both the news and the message that Lawrence brought. He accepted the new plan instantly, ordered his camelry to march to Aqaba, and made arrangements that the Arab regulars, now numbering about 1,800 men, should be shipped there as early as possible together with all the stores from Wejh. He also gave Lawrence a letter for Hussein.

Next morning at dawn Lawrence flew back to Wejh, and re-embarked in the Dujferin for Jidda, where he received Wilson's unstinted promise of moral and material support. Hussein came down from Mecca, and, under Wilson's influence, agreed to Feisal's transfer. Lawrence was -truck by the similarity between the two men in the narrow orbit of their thought, their loyalty to a cause, and their intense honesty of purpose, which in Hussein's case led him, perhaps not without cause, to view everyone else, save Wilson, as potential 'crooks'.

Yet Lawrence himself was hardly less disturbed when a telegram from Cairo reported that the Howeitat were in treacherous correspondence with the Turks at Ma'an, and a second telegram suggested that Auda was in the plot. As he held the keys to Aqaba, the menace was obvious. Lawrence boarded the Hardinge and sailed at once for Aqaba, which he reached on the afternoon of August 5th.

On landing he did not tell Nasir of the report, but simply asked for a swift camel and a guide. He also told Nasir that Hussein had granted him a month's leave to visit Mecca, a long sought privilege which so delighted Nasir that he sold Lawrence Ghazala, peerless among camels. Riding through the night up the Wadi Ithm Lawrence reached Guweira and found Auda talking with other leaders in a tent. They showed signs of confusion, but he greeted them gaily, and chatted about trivialities until he had a chance of speaking to Auda and his cousin Mohammed el Dheilan alone.

When he mentioned the subject of their correspondence with the Turks they told an elaborate story of a ruse played on the Turks. It was too elaborate to be convincing. Lawrence pretended to enter into the joke, but he perceived that 'there was more behind. They were angry that no guns or troops had yet come to their support; and that no rewards had been given them for taking Aqaba. They were anxious to know how I had learnt of their secret dealings, and how much more I knew. We were on a slippery ledge'. So was Lawrence, as an individual, although he does not emphasize the point. He played on their fears by carelessly quoting, as if they were his own words, actual phrases from the letters they had exchanged with the Turks. And he told them incidentally that Feisal's whole army was coming up, and also of the munitions and money that Allenby was sending. Finally he suggested that Auda might like an advance instalment of Feisal's bounty.

'Auda saw that the immediate moment would not be unprofitable: that Feisal would be highly profitable: and that the Turks would be always with him if other resources failed. So he agreed, in a very good temper, to accept my advance; and with it to keep the Howeitat well-fed and cheerful.'

Easier in mind, Lawrence set out back to Aqaba after dark. Riding all night, he had a talk with Nasir on arrival and paddled out in a derelict canoe to the Hardinge just as the dawn was coming. He had been gone only thirty-six hours, and had not been expected back for a week. But while he went below to sleep, the ship made full steam for Suez. Thence he telephoned a reassuring report to Cairo, in which he said that the reports of treachery were unfounded . . .





Please note: to avoid opening the book out, with the risk of damaging the spine, some of the pages were slightly raised on the inner edge when being scanned, which has resulted in some blurring to the text and a shadow on the inside edge of the final images. Colour reproduction is shown as accurately as possible but please be aware that some colours are difficult to scan and may result in a slight variation from the colour shown below to the actual colour.

Some of the illustrations may be shown enlarged for greater detail and clarity.



IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR PROSPECTIVE buyers



U.K. buyers:

To estimate the “packed weight” each book is first weighed and then an additional amount of 150 grams is added to allow for the packaging material (all books are securely wrapped and posted in a cardboard book-mailer). The weight of the book and packaging is then rounded up to the nearest hundred grams to arrive at the postage figure. I make no charge for packaging materials and do not seek to profit from postage and packaging. Postage can be combined for multiple purchases.

Packed weight of this item : approximately 1000 grams

Postage and payment options to U.K. addresses:
  • Details of the various postage options (for example, First Class, First Class Recorded, Second Class and/or Parcel Post if the item is heavy) can be obtained by selecting the “Postage and payments” option at the head of this listing (above).

  • Payment can be made by: debit card, credit card (Visa or MasterCard, but not Amex), cheque (payable to "G Miller", please), or PayPal.

  • Please contact me with name, address and payment details within seven days of the end of the sale; otherwise I reserve the right to cancel the sale and re-list the item.

  • Finally, this should be an enjoyable experience for both the buyer and seller and I hope you will find me very easy to deal with. If you have a question or query about any aspect (postage, payment, delivery options and so on), please do not hesitate to contact me, using the contact details provided at the end of this listing.





International buyers:

To estimate the “packed weight” each book is first weighed and then an additional amount of 150 grams is added to allow for the packaging material (all books are securely wrapped and posted in a cardboard book-mailer). The weight of the book and packaging is then rounded up to the nearest hundred grams to arrive at the shipping figure. I make no charge for packaging materials and do not seek to profit from shipping and handling.

Shipping can usually be combined for multiple purchases (to a maximum of 5 kilograms in any one parcel with the exception of Canada, where the limit is 2 kilograms).

Packed weight of this item : approximately 1000 grams

International Shipping options:

Details of the postage options to various countries (via Air Mail) can be obtained by selecting the “Postage and payments” option at the head of this listing (above) and then selecting your country of residence from the drop-down list. For destinations not shown or other requirements, please contact me before offerding. Tracked and "Signed For" services are also available if required, but at an additional charge to that shown on the Postage and payments page, which is for ordinary uninsured Air Mail delivery.

Due to the extreme length of time now taken for deliveries, surface mail is no longer a viable option and I am unable to offer it even in the case of heavy items. I am afraid that I cannot make any exceptions to this rule.

Payment options for international buyers:
  • Payment can be made by: all major credit cards (Visa or MasterCard, but not Amex) or PayPal. I can also accept a cheque in GBP [British Pounds Sterling] but only if drawn on a major British bank.

  • Regretfully, due to extremely high conversion charges, I CANNOT accept foreign currency : all payments must be made in GBP [British Pounds Sterling]. This can be accomplished easily using a credit card, which I am able to accept as I have a separate, well-established business, or PayPal.

  • Please contact me with your name and address and payment details within seven days of the end of the sale; otherwise I reserve the right to cancel the sale and re-list the item.

  • Finally, this should be an enjoyable experience for both the buyer and seller and I hope you will find me very easy to deal with. If you have a question or query about any aspect (shipping, payment, delivery options and so on), please do not hesitate to contact me, using the contact details provided at the end of this listing.

Prospective international buyers should ensure that they are able to provide credit card details or pay by PayPal within 7 days from the end of the sale (or inform me that they will be sending a cheque in GBP drawn on a major British bank). Thank you.





(please note that the book shown is for illustrative purposes only and forms no part of this sale)

Book dimensions are given in inches, to the nearest quarter-inch, in the format width x height.

Please note that, to differentiate them from soft-covers and paperbacks, modern hardbacks are still invariably described as being ‘cloth’ when they are, in fact, predominantly bound in paper-covered boards pressed to resemble cloth.






Fine Books for Fine Minds


I value your custom (and my response rating) but I am also a bibliophile : I want books to arrive in the same condition in which they were dispatched. For this reason, all books are securely wrapped in tissue and a protective covering and are then posted in a cardboard container. If any book is significantly not as described, I will offer a full refund. Unless the size of the book precludes this, hardback books with a dust-jacket are usually provided with a clear film protective cover, while hardback books without a dust-jacket are usually provided with a rigid clear cover.

The Royal Mail, in my experience, offers an excellent service, but things can occasionally go wrong. However, I believe it is my responsibility to guarantee delivery. If any book is lost or damaged in transit, I will offer a full refund.

Thank you for looking.





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