Martin Luther Opera Omnia Complete Works 1551-1603 14 Foliovols Reformation Nres


Martin Luther Opera Omnia Complete Works 1551-1603 14 Foliovols Reformation Nres

This item has been shown 0 times.

Buy Now

Martin Luther Opera Omnia Complete Works 1551-1603 14 Foliovols Reformation Nres:
$3,550


“HERE I STAND. I CAN DO NO OTHER.” – Luther at the Diet of Worms, 1521.

 

OFFERED WITH is AN EXTRAORDINARY AND VANISHINGLY SCARCE COMPLETE 16TH CENTURY 14-VOLUME FOLIO SET (BOUND IN TWELVE VOLUMES) OF THE COMPLETE WORKS OF MARTIN LUTHER IN GERMAN, ALL PRINTED AT WITTENBERG BETWEEN 1551 AND 1603, AND ALL BOUND UNIFORMLY IN EARLY 17TH CENTURY BLINDSTAMPED CALF, ADORNED WITH A BLINDSTAMPED PORTRAIT OF LUTHER UPON EACH FRONT BOARD, AND A DIFFERENT BLINDSTAMPED PORTRAIT UPON EACH REAR BOARD, AND FINALLY WITH ORIGINAL EARLY 17TH CENTURY BRASS CLASPS AND CATCHES UPON EACH VOLUME, OF WHICH 11 ARE INTACT AND IN WORKING ORDER. EACH OF THE 14 VOLUMES IS COMPLETE IN ALL RESPECTS AND EACH IS ADORNED WITH A BEATIFUL WOODCUT TITLE AS WELL AS NUMEROUS WOODCUT INITIALS. ALL OF LUTHER’S WORLD-CHANGING WORKS ARE PRESENT – EVERY WORD HE WROTE, FROM HIS 95 THESES TO ‘THE BONDAGE OF THE WILL,’ THE ‘BABYLONIAN CAPTIVITY,’ THE WORKS ESTABLISHING HIS DOCTRINE OF JUSTIFICATION BY FAITH ALONE, THE CATECHISMS, AND THE COMMENTARIES ON SCRIPTURE. THE SET IS ADORNED WITH A WOODCUT MAP OF ASIA, AFRICA AND EUROPE, COMPLETE WITH MYTHICAL MONSTERS, AS WELL AS TWO HALF-PAGE WOODCUTS OF TWO DIFFERENT INCARNATIONS OF THE DEVIL. THIS IS THE ONLY COMPLETE SET OF THE FULL GERMAN EDITION OF LUTHER’S WORKS THAT WE CAN TRACE IN THE sale RECORD SINCE WORLD WAR II. It is very unlikely that another opportunity will arise to acquire a similar complete 14-volume set will arise in the foreseeable future. There have been two near comparisons in the sale record: in 1959, a 12-volume set was sold, but it lacked the register, which is present in the set offered here; in 2007, a set was sold that contained volumes 1-5 and 7-12, but lacked volume 6, which again is present here. Otherwise, 8-volume sets are all that have appeared. There is a single 8-volume set offered at present on ABE for about USD 21,000.

 

PROVENANCE: 1. The Fourth and Fifth volumes bear ownership inscriptions on the title dated 1602.

 

THE SET IS COMPLETE IN ALL RESPECTS. The relevant details for all volumes are as follows:

 

THE TITLE, THE YEAR AND PLACE OF PUBLICATION, THE PRINTER AND THE PAGINATION OF EACH VOLUME IS AS FOLLOWS: I. “Der Erste Teil [The First Volume] der Bücher uber etliche Epistel der Aposteln [on the Epistles of the Apostles].” 23 leaves, 562 pages, Wittenberg, Zacharias Lehmann, 1602. – Not in VD17 (vgl. 7:705530R). - II. “Der ander Teil [The Second Volume] der Bücher D. Mart. Luth. Darin alle Streitschrifften [the complete controversial writings/pamphlets]. 6 unnumbered leaves, 429 numbered leaves. Wittenberg, Simon Gronenberg, 1588. - VD16, L 3398. -III. Der Dritt Teil [The Third Volume] der Bücher des Ehrnwirdigen Herrn Doctoris Martini Lutheri ... 8 unnumbered leaves, 594 numbered leaves. Wittenberg, Anton Schön, 1581. - VD16 L 3391. - IV. Der Vierdte Teil [the Fourth Volume] Der Bücher des Ehrwirdigen Herrn Docto. Mart. Luth. darin zusamen gebracht sind Christliche und tröstliche erklerung [Christian and consolatory writings]. 8 unnumbered leaves, 605 (mispaginated, actually 607) numbered leaves. Wittenberg, Hans Lufft, 1551. - VD 16, L 3315. V. Der Fünffte Teil [The Fifth Volume] der Bücher Ehrnwirdigen Herrn Doct. Martini Lutheri. 6 leaves, 583 pages, 1 blank leaf. Wittenberg, Zacharias Lehmann, 1603. - VD17 7:705530R.  VI. Der Sechste Teil [the Sixth Volume] der Bücher des Ehrnwirdigen Herrn Doctoris Martini Lutheri. 6 unnumbered leaves, 597 numbered leaves, 2 blank leaves. Wittenberg, Matthaeus Welack, 1589. - VD16 L 3400. VII. Der Siebende Teil [The Seventh Volume] der Bücher des Ehrwirdigen Herrn Doctoris Mart. Lutheri. 6 leaves, 580 pages. Wittenberg, Zacharias Lehman, 1602. - VD 16, L 3321.  VIII. Der Achte Teil [The Eighth Volume] der Bücher des Ehrnwirdigen Herrn D. Martini Lutheri. 6 unnumbered leaves, 582 numbered leaves. Wittenberg, Anton Schön, 1583. - VD16 L 3393. IX. Der Neundte Teil [The Ninth Volume] der Bücher des Ehrnwirdigen Herrn D. Martini Lutheri. 4 unnumbered leaves (including one blank leaf), 558 numbered leaves, 8 unnumbered leaves (including one blank leaf) Wittenberg, (Simon Gronenberg), 1590. - VD16 L 3402.  X. Der Zehende Teil [The Tenth Volume] der Bücher des Ehrwirdigen Herrn D. Martini Lutheri. 6 leaves, 600 pages. Wittenberg, Johann Krafft, 1593. - VD16 L 3403. -  XI. Der Eilffte Teil [The Eleventh Volume] der Bücher des Ehrwirdigen Herrn D. Martini Lutheri. 2 parts bound together in 1. 8 unnumbered leaves, 338 numbered leaves; 6 numbered leaves, 381 numbered leaves, 1 blank leaf. Wittemberg, (Thomas Klug), 1558. - VD16 L 3340  XII. Der Zwölffte und letzte Teil [The Twelfth and Last Volume] der Bücher des Ehrwirdigen Hernn D. Mart. Lutheri. 8 leaves, 482 pages, 1 blank leaf. Wittenberg, Zacharias Lehmann, 1603. - Register Deutsch und Lateinisch, aller Bücher und Schrifften des Ehrwirdigen Herrn D. Martini Lutheri. [Register in German and Latin of all the Books and Writings of the Honoured Doctor Martin Luther] Durch Sigismundum Schwob von der Freistad (d. i. Sigesmund Suevus). 2 parts. 44 unnumbered leaves, 26 unnumbered leaves. Wittenberg, Zacharias Lehmann, 1603. 

 

IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO OVERSTATE THE IMPORTANCE OF THE WORKS OF MARTIN LUTHER ON WESTERN HISTORY. HIS WRITINGS BEGAN THE REFORMATION, AND NO INDIVIDUAL HAS EXERCISED A GREATER INFLUENCE UPON THE COURSE OF THE SUBSEQUENT HALF MILLENIUM. From Wikipedia: “Martin Luther (10 November 1483 – 18 February 1546) was a German monk, Catholic priest, professor of theology and seminal figure of a reform movement in 16th century Christianity, subsequently known as the Protestant Reformation. He strongly disputed the claim that freedom from God's punishment for sin could be purchased with money. He Tetzel, a Dominican friar, with his Ninety-Five Theses in 1517. His refusal to retract all of his writings at the demand of Pope Leo X in 1520 and the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V at the Diet of Worms in 1521 resulted in hisexcommunication by the Pope and condemnation as an outlaw by the Emperor.

 

“Luther taught that salvation and subsequently eternity in heaven is not earned by good deeds but is received only as a free gift of God'sgrace through faith in Jesus Christ as redeemer from sin and subsequently eternity in hell. His theology challenged the authority of thePope of the Roman Catholic Church by teaching that the Bible is the only source of divinely revealed knowledge from God and opposed sacerdotalism by considering all baptized Christians to be a holy priesthood. Those who identify with these, and all of Luther's wider teachings, are called Lutherans.

 

“His translation of the Bible into the vernacular (instead of Latin) made it more accessible, which had a tremendous impact on the church and on German culture. It fostered the development of a standard version of the German language, added several principles to the art of translation, and influenced the writing of an English translation, the King James Bible. His hymns influenced the development of singing in churches. His marriage to Katharina von Bora set a model for the practice of clerical marriage, allowing Protestant priests to marry.”

 

LUTHER BEGINS THE REFORMATION.

 

In 1516, Johann Tetzel, a Dominican friar and papal commissioner for indulgences, was sent to Germany by the Roman Catholic Church to sell indulgences to raise money to rebuild St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. Roman Catholic theology stated that faith alone, whether fiduciary or dogmatic, cannot justify man; justification rather depends only on such faith as is active in charity and good works (fides caritate formata). The benefits of good works could be obtained by donating money to the church.

 

On 31 October 1517, Luther wrote to his bishop, Albert of Mainz, protesting the sale of indulgences. He enclosed in his letter a copy of his "Disputation of Martin Luther on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences," which came to be known as The Ninety-Five Theses. Hans Hillerbrand writes that Luther had no intention of confronting the church, but saw his disputation as a scholarly objection to church practices, and the tone of the writing is accordingly "searching, rather than doctrinaire." Hillerbrand writes that there is nevertheless an undercurrent of challenge in several of the theses, particularly in Thesis 86, which asks: "Why does the pope, whose wealth today is greater than the wealth of the richest Crassus, build the basilica of St. Peter with the money of poor believers rather than with his own money?"

 

Luther objected to a saying attributed to Johann Tetzel that "As soon as the coin in the coffer rings, the soul from purgatory [also attested as 'into heaven'] springs."

 

He insisted that, since forgiveness was God's alone to grant, those who claimed that indulgences absolved buyers from all punishments and granted them salvation were in error. Christians, he said, must not slacken in following Christ on account of such false assurances.

 

However, this oft-quoted saying of Tetzel was by no means representative of contemporary Catholic teaching on indulgences, but rather a reflection of his capacity to exaggerate. Yet if Tetzel overstated the matter in regard to indulgences for the dead, his teaching on indulgences for the living was in line with Catholic dogma of the time.

 

According to scholars Walter Krämer, Götz Trenkler, Gerhard Ritter and Gerhard Prause, the story of the posting on the door, even though it has settled as one of the pillars of history, has little foundation in truth. The story is based on comments made by Philipp Melanchthon, though it is thought that he was not in Wittenberg at the time.

 

It was not until January 1518 that friends of Luther translated the 95 Theses from Latin into German, printed, and widely copied, making the controversy one of the first in history to be aided by the printing press. Within two weeks, copies of the theses had spread throughout Germany; within two months throughout Europe.

 

Luther's writings circulated widely, reaching France, England, and Italy as early as 1519. Students thronged to Wittenberg to hear Luther speak. He published a short commentary on Galatians and his Work on the Psalms. This early part of Luther's career was one of his most creative and productive. Three of his best-known works were published in 1520: To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation, On the Babylonian Captivity of the Church, and On the Freedom of a Christian.

 

JUSTIFICATION BY FAITH ALONE

 

From 1510 to 1520, Luther lectured on the Psalms, the books of Hebrews, Romans, and Galatians. As he studied these portions of the Bible, he came to view the use of terms such as penance and righteousness by the Catholic Church in new ways. He became convinced that the church was corrupt in its ways and had lost sight of what he saw as several of the central truths of Christianity. The most important for Luther was the doctrine of justification – God's act of declaring a sinner righteous – by faith alone through God's grace. He began to teach that salvation or redemption is a gift of God's grace, attainable only through faith in Jesus as the Messiah. "This one and firm rock, which we call the doctrine of justification," he wrote, "is the chief article of the whole Christian doctrine, which comprehends the understanding of all godliness."

 

Luther came to understand justification as entirely the work of God. This teaching by Luther was clearly expressed in his 1525 publication On the Bondage of the Will, which was written in response to On Free Will by Desiderius Erasmus (1524). Luther based his position on Predestination on St. Paul's epistle to the Ephesians 2:8–10. Against the teaching of his day that the righteous acts of believers are performed in cooperation with God, Luther wrote that Christians receive such righteousness entirely from outside themselves; that righteousness not only comes from Christ but actually is the righteousness of Christ, imputed to Christians (rather than infused into them) through faith. "That is why faith alone makes someone just and fulfills the law," he wrote. "Faith is that which brings the Holy Spirit through the merits of Christ." Faith, for Luther, was a gift from God; the experience of being justified by faith was "as though I had been born again." His entry into Paradise, no less, was a discovery about "the righteousness of God" – a discovery that "the just person" of whom the Bible speaks (as in Romans 1:17) lives by faith. He explained his concept of "justification" in the Smalcald Articles:

 

The first and chief article is this: Jesus Christ, our God and Lord, died for our sins and was raised again for our justification (Romans 3:24–25). He alone is the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world (John 1:29), and God has laid on Him the iniquity of us all (Isaiah 53:6). All have sinned and are justified freely, without their own works and merits, by His grace, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, in His blood (Romans 3:23–25). This is necessary to believe. This cannot be otherwise acquired or grasped by any work, law or merit. Therefore, it is clear and certain that this faith alone justifies us ... Nothing of this article can be yielded or surrendered, even though heaven and earth and everything else falls (Mark 13:31).

 

Luther's rediscovery of "Christ and His salvation" was the first of two points that became the foundation for the Reformation. His railing against the sale of indulgences was based on it.

 

LUTHER’S BREACH WITH THE PAPACY AND EXCOMMUNICATION.

 

Archbishop Albrecht of Mainz and Magdeburg did not reply to Luther's letter containing the 95 Theses. He had the theses checked for heresy and in December 1517 forwarded them to Rome. He needed the revenue from the indulgences to pay off a papal dispensation for his tenure of more than one bishopric. As Luther later noted, "the pope had a finger in the pie as well, because one half was to go to the building of St Peter's Church in Rome".

 

Pope Leo X was used to reformers and heretics, and he responded slowly, "with great care as is proper." Over the next three years he deployed a series of papal theologians and envoys against Luther, which served only to harden the reformer's anti-papal theology. First, the Dominican theologian Sylvester Mazzolini drafted a heresy case against Luther, whom Leo then summoned to Rome. The Elector Frederickpersuaded the pope to have Luther examined at Augsburg, where the Imperial Diet was held. There, in October 1518, under questioning bypapal legate Cardinal Cajetan Luther stated that he did not consider the papacy part of the biblical Church because historistical interpretation of Bible prophecy concluded that the papacy was the Antichrist. The prophecies concerning the Antichrist soon became the center of controversy. The hearings degenerated into a shouting match. More than his writing the 95 Theses, Luther's confrontation with the church cast him as an enemy of the pope. Cajetan's original instructions had been to arrest Luther if he failed to recant, but desisted from doing so. Luther slipped out of the city at night, unbeknownst to Cajetan.

   

In January 1519, at Altenburg in Saxony, the papal nuncio Karl von Miltitz adopted a more conciliatory approach. Luther made certain concessions to the Saxon, who was a relative of the Elector, and promised to remain silent if his opponents did. The theologian Johann Eck, however, was determined to expose Luther's doctrine in a public forum. In June and July 1519, he staged adisputation with Luther's colleague Andreas Karlstadt at Leipzig and invited Luther to speak. Luther's boldest assertion in the debate was that Matthew 16:18 does not confer on popes the exclusive right to interpret scripture, and that therefore neither popes nor church councils were infallible. For this, Eck branded Luther a new Jan Hus, referring to the Czech reformer and heretic burned at the stake in 1415. From that moment, he devoted himself to Luther's defeat.

   

On 15 June 1520, the Pope warned Luther with the papal bull (edict) Exsurge Domine that he risked excommunication unless he recanted 41 sentences drawn from his writings, including the 95 Theses, within 60 days. That autumn, Johann Eck proclaimed the bull in Meissen and other towns. Karl von Miltitz, a papal nuncio, attempted to broker a solution, but Luther, who had sent the Pope a copy of On the Freedom of a Christian in October, publicly set fire to the bull and decretals at Wittenberg on 10 December 1520, an act he defended in Why the Pope and his Recent Book are Burned and Assertions Concerning All Articles. As a consequence, Luther was excommunicated by Pope Leo X on 3 January 1521, in the bull Decet Romanum Pontificem.

   

LUTHER AT THE DIET OF WORMS

 

The enforcement of the ban on the 95 Theses fell to the secular authorities. On 18 April 1521, Luther appeared as ordered before the Diet of Worms. This was a general assembly of the estates of the Holy Roman Empire that took place in Worms, a town on the Rhine. It was conducted from 28 January to 25 May 1521, with Emperor Charles V presiding. Prince Frederick III, Elector of Saxony, obtained a safe conduct for Luther to and from the meeting.

 

Johann Eck, speaking on behalf of the Empire as assistant of the Archbishop of Trier, presented Luther with copies of his writings laid out on a table and asked him if the books were his, and whether he stood by their contents. Luther confirmed he was their author, but requested time to think about the answer to the second question. He prayed, consulted friends, and gave his response the next day:

 

Unless I am convinced by the testimony of the Scriptures or by clear reason (for I do not trust either in the pope or in councils alone, since it is well known that they have often erred and contradicted themselves), I am bound by the Scriptures I have quoted and my conscience is captive to the Word of God. I cannot and will not recant anything, since it is neither safe nor right to go against conscience. May God help me. Amen.

 

Eck informed Luther that he was acting like a heretic:

 

"'Martin,' said he, 'there is no one of the heresies which have torn the bosom of the church, which has not derived its origin from the various interpretation of the Scripture. The Bible itself is the arsenal whence each innovator has drawn his deceptive arguments. It was with biblical texts that Pelagius and Arius maintained their doctrines. Arius, for instance, found the negation of the eternity of the Word—an eternity which you admit, in this verse of the New Testament—Joseph knew not his wife till she had brought forth her first-born son; and he said, in the same way that you say, that this passage enchained him. When the fathers of the council of Constance condemned this proposition of John Huss— The church of Jesus Christ is only the community of the elect, they condemned an error; for the church, like a good mother, embraces within her arms all who bear the name of Christian, all who are called to enjoy the celestial beatitude.'"

 

Luther refused to recant his writings. He is sometimes also quoted as saying: "Here I stand. I can do no other". Recent scholars consider the evidence for these words to be unreliable, since they were inserted before "May God help me" only in later versions of the speech and not recorded in witness accounts of the proceedings.

 

Over the next five days, private conferences were held to determine Luther's fate. The Emperor presented the final draft of the Diet of Worms on 25 May 1521, declaring Luther anoutlaw, banning his literature, and requiring his arrest: "We want him to be apprehended and punished as a notorious heretic." It also made it a crime for anyone in Germany to give Luther food or shelter. It permitted anyone to kill Luther without legal consequence.

  THE PRESENT SET CONTAINS ALL OF THE WRITINGS DESCRIBED ABOVE, AND MANY, MANY MORE. IT CONTAINS EVERY WORD THAT LUTHER PUBLISHED. AS FAR AS WE CAN DETERMINE, IT IS THE ONLY COMPLETE SET OFFERED SINCE WWII.  

Of course, as may clearly be seen from the photos below, the set is not without wear. The uniform early 17th century blindstamped vellum bindings over thick wooden boards are quite beautiful, with strong book-blocks in all cases and the hinges holding in all cases firmly by the cords. 11 of 24 wrought brass clasps are present and in working order. The portraits impressed at the center of each board are in all cases very good to excellent impressions. That said, the front board of the first volume is broken, and several compartments of the spines of several volumes have been replaced with vellum from an illuminated medieval breviary. This, of course, has its own beauty. Finally, all boards exhibit worming, sometimes heavy. Internally, the set has very attractive, wide margins, and excellent impressions of the woodcut titles, illustrations and initials. Again, the leaves show worming, particularly the first and final gatherings of each volume. This costs a few or several letters on these pages, but never affects legibility. The fourth volume is dampstained, affecting text but not legibility. The pages are for the most part otherwise quite clean. Considered generally, THIS IS A VERY BEAUTIFUL SET, THE IMPORTANCE AND SCARCITY OF WHICH, AS COMPLETE, CAN HARDLY BE OVERSTATED.

 

THE 14-VOLUME SET, BOUND IN 12 VOLUMES, IS COMPLETE IN ALL RESPECTS. The set is comprised of volumes of two sizes. The taller volumes measure about 35.4 cm by 22.3 cm by 5.8 cm; each leaf measures about 335 mm by 210 mm. The slightly shorter volumes measure about 32.6 cm by 22.0 cm by 8.1 cm; each leaf of these slightly shorter volumes measures about 310 mm by 200 mm.

 

OFFERED WITH .

       

 

Please take the time necessary to review the photos below in order to gain a better understanding of the content and condition of the volume. Please also take a moment to view my other sales of rare and desirable English and Continental printed books dating from the 15th through the 19th century.

 

Shipment is free for customers in the United States and Canada. For U.S. clients we ship either FedEx Ground for large shipments or USPS Priority for single books or smaller amounts. We ship using Canada Post for Canadian customers.

 

  Canadian buyers please note that we list on .com which automatically charges for international shipment. Your invoice will be amended to reflect free shipping.

 

  Please note as of January 2013 USPS has increased International shipping charges on average by 25%.

 

We charge for shipment of international orders.  We try to ship using USPS flat rate priority-mail boxes and we charge for shipment at cost or slightly below. Small 12mo books are shipped for USD 24.00. The cost of shipment for any book in Octavo, Quarto or small folio format is USD 60.00. The cost of shipment for large folios or quartos of equivalent size is USD 78.00. Multiple folio volumes and sets are, of course, generally more expensive and the cost of their shipment will always be quoted in the listing. With all of our sales if an individual client wins multiple books we charge only charge for the shipment of one book and cover the cost of shipment of the rest. Please note that mobile devices do not yet display correctly the shipment costs for international customers. Please enquire or consult the non-mobile site in order to obtain complete information concerning the cost of shipment.

   

All purchases save those by Canadian clients are shipped from New York State once per week, weather permitting. If you require faster service or special handling please let us know and we will do our best to accomodate.

                                                           


Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
More than just a pretty picture.  Try Vendio Image Hosting.
     


Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
Click to View Image Album
More than just a pretty picture.  Try Vendio Image Hosting.
Your browser does not support JavaScript. To view this page, enable JavaScript if it is disabled or upgrade your browser.
Click Here. Double your traffic. Get Vendio Gallery - Now FREE!


Martin Luther Opera Omnia Complete Works 1551-1603 14 Foliovols Reformation Nres:
$3,550

Buy Now



Very Rare Antique Chinese Scroll Book Of Hens, Roosters, & Chicks-very Nice picture
Very Rare Antique Chinese Scroll Book Of Hens, Roosters, & Chicks-very Nice


The Memoirs Of The Aga Khan Cassell 1954 picture
The Memoirs Of The Aga Khan Cassell 1954


The Memoirs Of The Aga Khan Cassell 1954 picture
The Memoirs Of The Aga Khan Cassell 1954


Irvine Welsh -  Neu Reekie; Signed 1st/1st picture
Irvine Welsh - Neu Reekie; Signed 1st/1st


C1880 Colour Map Of Surrey By Letts, Son & Co picture
C1880 Colour Map Of Surrey By Letts, Son & Co


1833 2vol Letters And Journals Of Lord Byron Thomas Moore Notices Third Edition picture
1833 2vol Letters And Journals Of Lord Byron Thomas Moore Notices Third Edition