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Original Duncan Wooden Jeweled Tournament Yo-yo, Tops. For Sale

Original Duncan Wooden Jeweled Tournament Yo-yo, Tops.

  • 1 Vintage original Duncan, Jeweled, Tournament Yo Yo. Jeweled on both sides, hardly used, very good condition. My guess is it has the original string on it too. I'm not a Yo Yo guy, just an honest guy. Some of the gold leaf (paint) lettering is missing from the second Y in Yo. Other than that, for it's age, this Yo Yo is very close to, if not excellent condition. And....for the record, it was owned by the legendary Yo Yo genius, Larry Sayco, and I can prove it if neccessary. Own a real piece of Yo Yo history. A piece owned by Yo Yo Royalty. Larry is in his eighties now. Talk about a rare find. In addition to the Yo Yo, the winner of this sale will get the 2 sided original of an old Larry Sayco advertisement as shown in the photos. Good luck! This sale is for the serious collector. This is an item for the type of guy Rocky Balboa was trying to describe to Marie when he walked her home. He told her that if she hangs around with Yo Yo people, then she's gonna have Yo Yo friends. This Yo Yo will most definitely go to a Yo Yo "Person".
  • Duncan Jeweled Yo-Yo

    Made from genuine Hard Rock Maple, the "jeweled" tournament, among serious collectors, is one of the most popular yo-yos in the world. The jewels are from the Austrian crystal factory used by Duncan in the 1950s.

    Original Duncan Jeweled Tournaments have sold for over $400 and a full display box of them sold for $4,100!

    TypeProductionShapeStandard piece />On Mar-22-13 at 20:49:16 PDT, seller added the following information:

    “Loop-the-loop. Around the World…Now, he’s some hard tricks with the yo-yo. Here’s one called third dimension, like a 3-d movie. You know the trick rockin’ the baby?

    When Larry Sayco was your age, yo-yos were made out of wood. They also cost 35 cents. The 9-time national yo-yo champion is old school. He performs in bloomers – 1930s style – and makes no-nonsense yo-yos with wooden axles in his workshop on Clifford Street in Pawtucket.

    Sayco can do tricks like the “yo-yo limbo,” the “Star of Rhode Island”, and “the Breakaway” with ease. But he should be able to – he invented them.

    The 76 year-old started yo-yoing professionally after he graduated from Notre Dame High School in Central Falls. But it all started one fateful day on Dexter Street in the same town, at a small variety store that sold Duncan yo-yos. Sayco can’t recall the name of the place that got him started on yo-yos in the 9thgrade, but he remembers the effect it had on his career.

    “It was a small variety store. They were selling Duncan yo-yos, so they would have the Duncan champion come down and you know, have a contest. So I entered and to my surprise, I won the contest.”

    Duncan was one of the first yo-yo makers. The company started selling its spinning marvels back in 1929. They got the idea for a yo-yo with a looped string that could do more than go up and down from Filipino immigrant Pedro Flores, who started the Flores Yo-yo company. Until the late 1960s, Duncan even had a patent on the word yo-yo.

    The company held its first world yo-yo competition in London in 1932, the same year the Arab-American Sayegh family welcomed their son Lawrence into the world on the second floor of their grocery store in Central Falls. For show business purposes, Lawrence Sayegh would later become Larry Sayco.

    Later in high school, Sayco entered a contest in Blackstone Valley with about 30 other kids. He won that too. In fact, he won so many local competitions, that after his high school graduation, Duncan representatives called and asked him to travel around the country, demonstrating for the company.

    When Sayco was 18, Duncan sent him to Detroit, Michigan to perform for groups of people and hold contests. After a taste of the limelight, he decided to stick with the job.

    In 1952, he performed at the Hotel Ritz in Paris. He demonstrated tricks like the “Overhand Crossfire” and the “Yo-yo Limbo,” where he sent yo-yos spiraling with both hands while bending backwards, on his knees, and touching his head to the ground.

    Over 12 years, Sayco traveled to 25 different countries with Duncan and held yo-yo contests in each city before he left. His scrapbooks are filled with postcards and pictures of the people he met along the way.

    In 1958, Sayco got so good, An Australian television program filmed him yo-yoing on the roof of a moving Ford in Tasmania.

    After two years, Sayco’s boss convinced him to enter the National Duncan yo-yo contest.

    “I figured I didn’t have a chance because some of these guys, they were wizzes at it, you know. The first time I entered, I won. Surprised the heck out of me.”

    He won it for the next nine years, until the early 60s, when Duncan lost the rights to the name “yo-yo,” and the company went bankrupt and stopped doing contests. Flambeau, Inc. later bought the company, and Sayco went on to patent and make his own tournament yo-yos in Pawtucket.

    32-year-old Ed Haponik, professional yo-yo player and North Carolina state yo-yo champion, met Sayco last August while visiting family in New England.

    Haponik says watching Sayco was like seeing an old film come to life.

    “It was really cool watching him with this really old style yo-yo, doing these tricks that have largely been forgotten, and doing them really, really well. He did this trick called the bank deposit, which is this trick that virtually no players can do now, where it goes directly into your pocket, and he did that three times in a row.

    Larry Sayco hovers over his yo-yos like a meticulous maternity nurse. His machines are homemade – a little bit of this, a few of these parts, and viola! He carefully dissolves the plastic from the yo-yo side, sticks the pieces together, pops them on a conveyor belt and waits for them to slide on down to the end. He even measures the string to your height so your shiny new yo-yo doesn’t hit the floor when you practice the fancy tricks he taught you – some of which he came up with 50 years ago.

    Haponik says Sayco has had a lasting influence on the yo-yo community – whether modern players know it or not.

    “A lot of today’s yo-yoers, especially the younger generation, really kind of blissfully ignores a lot of the yo-yoing that’s gone on prior to them. And that’s to their detriment, because they don’t realize it, but I mean, they’re standing on these great shoulders.”

    Larry Sayco used to his yo-yos for a dollar to neighborhood kids, until someone started buying them from him and selling them online for profit. But he still sells the yo-yos when people hire him to perform. And every once in a while, he makes one for a very lucky guest

    On Mar-22-13 at 20:50:47 PDT, seller added the following information:

    “Loop-the-loop. Around the World…Now, here’s some hard tricks with the yo-yo. Here’s one called third dimension, like a 3-d movie. You know the trick rockin’ the baby?

    When Larry Sayco was your age, yo-yos were made out of wood. They also cost 35 cents. The 9-time national yo-yo champion is old school. He performs in bloomers – 1930s style – and makes no-nonsense yo-yos with wooden axles in his workshop on Clifford Street in Pawtucket.

    Sayco can do tricks like the “yo-yo limbo,” the “Star of Rhode Island”, and “the Breakaway” with ease. But he should be able to – he invented them.

    The 76 year-old started yo-yoing professionally after he graduated from Notre Dame High School in Central Falls. But it all started one fateful day on Dexter Street in the same town, at a small variety store that sold Duncan yo-yos. Sayco can’t recall the name of the place that got him started on yo-yos in the 9thgrade, but he remembers the effect it had on his career.

    “It was a small variety store. They were selling Duncan yo-yos, so they would have the Duncan champion come down and you know, have a contest. So I entered and to my surprise, I won the contest.”

    Duncan was one of the first yo-yo makers. The company started selling its spinning marvels back in 1929. They got the idea for a yo-yo with a looped string that could do more than go up and down from Filipino immigrant Pedro Flores, who started the Flores Yo-yo company. Until the late 1960s, Duncan even had a patent on the word yo-yo.

    The company held its first world yo-yo competition in London in 1932, the same year the Arab-American Sayegh family welcomed their son Lawrence into the world on the second floor of their grocery store in Central Falls. For show business purposes, Lawrence Sayegh would later become Larry Sayco.

    Later in high school, Sayco entered a contest in Blackstone Valley with about 30 other kids. He won that too. In fact, he won so many local competitions, that after his high school graduation, Duncan representatives called and asked him to travel around the country, demonstrating for the company.

    When Sayco was 18, Duncan sent him to Detroit, Michigan to perform for groups of people and hold contests. After a taste of the limelight, he decided to stick with the job.

    In 1952, he performed at the Hotel Ritz in Paris. He demonstrated tricks like the “Overhand Crossfire” and the “Yo-yo Limbo,” where he sent yo-yos spiraling with both hands while bending backwards, on his knees, and touching his head to the ground.

    Over 12 years, Sayco traveled to 25 different countries with Duncan and held yo-yo contests in each city before he left. His scrapbooks are filled with postcards and pictures of the people he met along the way.

    In 1958, Sayco got so good, An Australian television program filmed him yo-yoing on the roof of a moving Ford in Tasmania.

    After two years, Sayco’s boss convinced him to enter the National Duncan yo-yo contest.

    “I figured I didn’t have a chance because some of these guys, they were wizzes at it, you know. The first time I entered, I won. Surprised the heck out of me.”

    He won it for the next nine years, until the early 60s, when Duncan lost the rights to the name “yo-yo,” and the company went bankrupt and stopped doing contests. Flambeau, Inc. later bought the company, and Sayco went on to patent and make his own tournament yo-yos in Pawtucket.

    32-year-old Ed Haponik, professional yo-yo player and North Carolina state yo-yo champion, met Sayco last August while visiting family in New England.

    Haponik says watching Sayco was like seeing an old film come to life.

    “It was really cool watching him with this really old style yo-yo, doing these tricks that have largely been forgotten, and doing them really, really well. He did this trick called the bank deposit, which is this trick that virtually no players can do now, where it goes directly into your pocket, and he did that three times in a row.

    Larry Sayco hovers over his yo-yos like a meticulous maternity nurse. His machines are homemade – a little bit of this, a few of these parts, and viola! He carefully dissolves the plastic from the yo-yo side, sticks the pieces together, pops them on a conveyor belt and waits for them to slide on down to the end. He even measures the string to your height so your shiny new yo-yo doesn’t hit the floor when you practice the fancy tricks he taught you – some of which he came up with 50 years ago.

    Haponik says Sayco has had a lasting influence on the yo-yo community – whether modern players know it or not.

    “A lot of today’s yo-yoers, especially the younger generation, really kind of blissfully ignores a lot of the yo-yoing that’s gone on prior to them. And that’s to their detriment, because they don’t realize it, but I mean, they’re standing on these great shoulders.”

    Larry Sayco used to his yo-yos for a dollar to neighborhood kids, until someone started buying them from him and selling them online for profit. But he still sells the yo-yos when people hire him to perform. And every once in a while, he makes one for a very lucky guest

    On Mar-23-13 at 14:37:42 PDT, seller added the following information:

    Read this article to understand the significance of this sale.This is an article I found from 5 years ago in July 2008 - "Written by a yo-yoer." Everyone in the family knows I yo-yo, probably because I'm effing obnoxious about doing it all over the place. My uncle, being no exception, approached me and asked if I was interested in meeting an old-time yo-yoer. As someone who's kind of into where yo-yoing comes from (see: yo-yo #1), I wondered who he meant. He shocked me by saying "his name is Larry Sayco". I had read a little about him via some web research at some point, and had heard more from people who had never met him, but knew of his legend.

    Larry Sayco was an old Duncan demonstrator in the 50's, and later broke away to form his own company. He used to sell his yo-yo's far and wide, but stopped suddenly when people began to take advantage of his generously low prices, marking them up in sales and sales. Now he only sells his wares at shows and functions, and has zero contact with what we'll term "the yo-yo community". It was through an annual show at my uncle's school that they had become acquainted.

    Although I had seen footage of him doing 2-handed loops while standing on top of a moving car, and had heard of his prolific skill as a performer, I as in no way prepared for our meeting. When we pulled up at his workshop, a non-descript, 400-square-foot brick oven in what appeared to be a non-descript, 800-square-foot town, rain was falling in torrents. My uncle and I , along with my two young cousins, knocked and entered, and I was amazed to find that Mr. Sayco stood about 5'2. He honestly seemed bigger in the pictures on my computer than in real life. He was extremely cordial, and asked "so who's the champ?"


    his workshop was totally cluttered by nick-nacks and papers ,but few yo-yo's. His walls were plastered with news-clippings of his old performances. Every photograph featured a grinning man with shining eyes, a pork pie hat, and knickers doing some extra-cheesy picture tricks, most of which I had never heard of , like "Tonto's Mask". The few yo-yo's that could be seen were of old-school plastic ilk, ultra-thin and devoid of any label, they looked like Duncan "Professionals" with opaque sidecaps. The majority of the space itself was taken up by several large, ancient industrial machines, and as we "toured the facility", Mr. Sayco described the function of each.

    All of the machines had been gingerly tinkered with. He was most proud of the string-twisting machine that he had constructed from spare parts. He claimed to have designed one for Duncan before leaving the company, but was embittered over not being able to take it with him. We saw the immense machine where the molds for the different Sayco yo-yo pieces (of which there are two) were pressed together. Mr. Sayco patted that machine like a trusty steed, saying "and this one cost me a mint... a MINT!". He also had a special press that fit the finished pieces together efficiently and tightly. He built a yo-yo for us from scratch, and quickly wound it a type 9 string.Then he started playing with it.

    This dude looks about 90. He's seriously old, and waddles around like some leprous piece of him is about to break off and get lost on the floor amidst the detritus of 40 years of yo-yo making. But, The dude can THROW nothing even remotely new-school, and lots of next-gen players would watch him and only vaguely recognize it as yo-yoing. There was no distinguishing between looping and string tricks. Everything was interwoven. his loops were pristine, and he knocked a penny off my cousin's ear "cause quarters are cheating!". He drilled bank deposit into his pants pocket 3 straight times, then punch-regenned into my cousin's pocket. It was like what I imagine Kareem Abdul-Jabbar would be like as a centenarian. He could be ancient, withered, and wheelchair-bound on the street, but put him on the hardcourt and he'd not only walk, but redefine grace.

    He asked to see my yo-yo (a Luchador), and said he "yeah, I invented that". When i looked incredulous (having helped test the first prototypes), he explained that he meant he was part of a group of guys who came up with the idea for the butterfly-shaped yo-yo, not the Luchador, specifically. although he dropped a few names, he explained that he was thoroughly independent from "yo-yoing". he just wasn't interested in being connected to other yo-yoers anymore. it was a fun job, but a job. He was attached neither to the glory days, nor to the fact that the yo-yo world had left him behind decades ago. He had left us there, too.

    Part of me wanted to say "you would blow peoples' minds! Let me get you on YouTube!" but thinking about it, I realized that he was so far beyond the need to show his skill off to others, the idea wouldn't be worth a thought. He had spent years winning contests, years on the road, years designing and building yo-yo's, years performing for kids Bar Mitzvahs. He had literally spent a lifetime in yo-yoing, and though he understood that "things had changed", he was also secure enough to understand that nothing important had. It's still playing with yo-yo's after all. The pettiness of my thought (and my yo-yoing) just seemed obscene in that moment.

    As we walked out the door, he tossed me the yo-yo he had made. a scorched odor was still emanating from the axle. It was thin, half the width of many popular models today. Like an awestruck teenager, I sked if he'd sign it, and he flashed to his workbench, where he used an electric dremel to engrave a quick signature onto the back cap. He tossed it back again and smiled meaningfully. "now, don't forget where it comes from," he said. I took 'it' to signify more than that particular yo-yo.

    In the car on the way back, my cousins were aglow. It was clear that they'd been hooked on yo-yoing, and that, true to their own generation, they'd be on the internet researching it within an hour.


    I still rock that yo-yo from time to time. It loops well. The gap is about the width of the cotton string on it, so string mounts have to be flawless. Eli hops are seriously tough, and anything more modern is pointless. When I pick it up, I think of two things. I think of the gnome-like yo-yo hermit who generously gave it to me, and I remember that to be a yo-yoer, you don't have to find yourself caught up in yo-yo drama all the time, or ever. Simply picking it up and throwing it with respect, and maybe a nod to all that have come before) is quite enough.


    Original Duncan Wooden Jeweled Tournament Yo-yo, Tops.

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    Buy Now

    Original Duncan Wooden Jeweled Tournament Yo-yo, Tops.:
    $104




Duncan Genuine Beginner's Wooden Yo-yo Red & Black With String Vintage  picture
Duncan Genuine Beginner's Wooden Yo-yo Red & Black With String Vintage


Vintage 1960s Pair Of Duncan Beginners Wooden Yo-yos Great Condition   picture
Vintage 1960s Pair Of Duncan Beginners Wooden Yo-yos Great Condition


2 Vintage Yo Yo's picture
2 Vintage Yo Yo's


3 X Vintage  Yo-yos  picture
3 X Vintage Yo-yos


1960's 12 Vintage Genuine Sir Duncan Spin Tops Mint Old Store Stock picture
1960's 12 Vintage Genuine Sir Duncan Spin Tops Mint Old Store Stock


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