Original Hand Signed Sheep Illustration Israel Menashe Kadishman Hebrew Book


Original Hand Signed Sheep Illustration Israel Menashe Kadishman Hebrew Book

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Original Hand Signed Sheep Illustration Israel Menashe Kadishman Hebrew Book:
$175


DESCRIPTION : Up for sale is a SMALL yet impressing ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATION of the acclaimed Jewish-Hebrew-Israeli PAINTER and SCULPTOR - MENASHE KADISHMAN. The HAND SIGNED ILLUSTRATION , With a purple marker is a part of a long detailed HEBREW INSCRIPTION of KADISHMAN on an ILLUSTRATED POETRY BOOK with KADISHMAN illustrations. The SMALL ILLUSTRATION is very SOPHISTICATED and COMPLEX : Two typical Kadishmn loving sheeps are kissing but their drawn lines continue to create the word "LOVE" and to merge with Menashe Kadishman Hebrew SIGNATURE and his blessings for "HEALTH and SATISFACTION" . The poetry book "God and a Fat Man in a Yellow Jeep" was written by Avi Elias, Illustrated by Kadishman and published in 2005. The illustration size is around 6x6" . The book size is around 6" x 9". 48 throughout illustrated pp. Excellent condition.( Pls look at scan for accurate AS IS images ) Will be sent inside a protective rigid packaging . PAYMENTS : Payment method accepted : Paypal .SHIPPMENT : SHIPP worldwide via registered airmail is $ 19. Will be sent inside a protective rigid packaging . Will be sent around 5 days after payment .
Menashe Kadishman(Hebrew: מנשה קדישמן; August 21, 1932 - May 8, 2015) was an Kadishman artworks are presented in central locations inIsrael, such asHabima Squareand his paintings can be found in many different galleries in Israel. He is most famous for his metallic sculptures and colorful sheep paintings. Contents 1 Biography 2 Motifs 3 Education 4 Awards 5 Sculptures and Public Works 5.1 United States 5.2 Canada 5.3 Costa Rica 5.4 Italy 5.5 Germany 5.6 Israel 5.7 Japan 5.8 The Netherlands 5.9 United Kingdom 5.10 Other works 6 See also 7 References Biography[edit] Kadishman was born in the British Mandate Palestine in 1932. His father, who was a pioneer, died when Kadishman was 15 years old. The young Menashe left school to help his mother with housework and to earn money.[1] From 1947 to 1950, Kadishman studied with the Israeli sculptorMoshe Sternschussat theAvni Institute of Art and DesigninTel Aviv, and in 1954 with the Israeli sculptorRudi LehmanninJerusalem. In 1959, he moved to London, where he attendedSaint Martin's School of Artand theSlade School of Art.[2]During 1959 and 1960 he also studied withAnthony CaroandReg Butler.[2]He remained here until 1972; he had his first one-man show there in 1965 at theGrosvenor Gallery. His sculptures of the 1960s wereMinimalistin style, and so designed as to appear to defy gravity. This was achieved either through careful balance and construction, as inSuspense(1966), or by using glass and metal so that the metal appeared unsupported, as inSegments(1968). The glass allowed the Environment to be part of the work. Kadishman lived and created in his house in the city center of Tel Aviv. Kadishman was divorced, has 2 children. His son, Ben, is also a painter and his daughter, Maya Kadishman, is an actress who is married to the artist, Eran Shakine. On May 8, 2015 Kadishman died after he was hospitalized at Sheba Medical Center in Tel Hashomer.[3] Motifs[edit] Portrait of Menashe Kadishman, 1979 Photographer: Stanley I. Batkin In his youth, between 1950 and 1953, Kadishman worked as Baruch. This experience with nature, sheep and shepherding had a significant impact on his later artistic work and career. The first major appearance of sheep in his work was in the 1978Venice Biennale, where Kadishman presented a flock of colored live sheep as living art.[4]In 1995, he began paintingportraitsof sheep by the hundreds, and even thousands, each one different from the next. These instantly-recognizable sheep portraits soon became his artistic "trademark". Education[edit] 1947-50 Sculpture, withMoshe Sternschuss,Avni Institute of Art and Design 1954 Sculpture, withRudi Lehman 1959-60 Art, Saint Martin's School of Art, London 1961 Art,Slade School, London Awards[edit] 1960 the America-Israel Cultural Foundation Scholarship.[2] 1961, the Sainsbury Scholarship, London.[2] 1967 first prize for sculpture, 5th Paris Biennale.[2] 1978 Sandberg Prize recipient 1980 America-Israel Cultural Foundation Scholarship[5] 1981 Eugene Kolb Prize for Israeli Graphic Arts,Tel AvivMuseum Prize of the Jury 1981 Norwegian International Print Biennale, Fredrikstad.[2] 1984 Mendel Pundik Prize for Israeli Art,Tel AvivMuseum[6] 1990 theDizengoff Prizefor Sculpture.[7] 1995 theIsrael Prize, for sculpture.[6] 2002 the Honorary Fellowship Award from the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.[2] Sculptures and Public Works[edit] United States[edit] Menashe Kadishman'sThe binding of Yitzhak New York 'Suspended', 1977, Storm King Art Center, Mountainville 'Eight Positive Trees', 1977, Storm King Art Center, Mountainville 'Sheep', 1979, The Jewish Museum, New York, NY 'Untitled', 1981, The Jewish Museum, New York, NY 'Shepherdess', 1984, The Jewish Museum, New York, NY 'The Sacrifice of Isaac', 1985, Hebrew Home at Riverdale, Bronx, NY Oklahoma 'The Sacrifice of Isaac', 1985, Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Norman 'Negative Tree', 2001, Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa 'Tree #1 (Positive)', 2001, Quartz Mountain Arts & Conference Center, Lone Wolf 'Tree #2 (Negative)', 2001, Quartz Mountain Arts & Conference Center, Lone Wolf Pennsylvania 'Three Discs', 1967, Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove Texas 'Segments', 1968, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas 'The Forest', 1970, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas 'Om', 1969, University of Houston, Houston Canada[edit] Menashe Kadishman'sThree Discs, (1967) in High Park inToronto,Ontario 'Three Discs', 1967, High Park, Toronto Costa Rica[edit] MADC Museo de Arte y Diseño Contemporáneo, San José Italy[edit] Morning Light (sheep+ sheep),Fattoria di Celle- Collezione Gori, Pistoia, Italy Germany[edit] Piëta,Braunschweig 'Falling Leaves', Jewish Museum, Berlin 'Pieta', Dominikanerkloster, Braunschweig 'Negative Trees', 1974, Wedau Sports Park, Duisburg Israel[edit] 1957 "The Dog", Artist Private Collection | 2015 China, SculptorMaty Grunberg, recreating Kadishman "The Dog 1957" in granite stone, under M. Kadishman's instruction 1960 Tension, Israel Museum, Jerusalem 1964 Uprise, a heavy steel sculpture near the Theatre and Performing Arts Center stage. Tel Aviv 1966 In Suspense, Israel Museum, Jerusalem 1967 In Suspense, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 1967-74 The Tree Circles,Tel Aviv 1975 In Suspense, University of Tel Aviv, TelAviv 1975 In Suspense, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv-Yaffo 1977 Circles, The Hebrew University, Har Hatsofim,Jerusalem 1979 Continuum,Weizmann Institute of Science,Rehovot 1982-1985 Akedat Issac, Tel Aviv Art Museum, Tel Aviv 1984 - Hill of the Sheep, The Tefen Open Museum of Israeli Art, Galilee 1985 Akedat Issac, University of Tel, Tel Aviv-Yaffo 1985, Trees Israel Museum Billy Rose Sculpture Art Garden, Jerusalem, Israel 1989 Birth, The Open Museum of Israeli Art, Galilee 1990 Trees, Rehavia,Jerusalem 1990 Birth, near the Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art. Herzliya 1994 Motherland,Lola Beer Ebner Sculpture Garden, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv-Yaffo 1995 The Family Plaza, The International School for Holocaust Studies, Yad Veshem, Jerusalem 1998 Scream,Lola Beer Ebner Sculpture Garden, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv-Yaffo 2004 Portrait of Shimon Finkel on the facade ofTel AvivCity Hall 2006 Memorial monument for the Etzel, Haganah and Lehi underground organizations, Ramat Gan Japan[edit] 'Prometheus', 1986–87,Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo The Netherlands[edit] 'Dream', 1993, Buddingh'plein, Dordrecht United Kingdom[edit] Tate Britain, London (England) Hollyfield, Harlow (England) Other works[edit] 'Horse' 'Motherland' 'Child and Horse' 'Kissing Birds' 'Homage to Young Couples' 'Homage to Barnett Newman' 'The Flock' 'Cracked Earth' **** 1932 Born in Tel Aviv 1947-50 Studies with the sculptor Moshe Sternschuss 1954 Studies with the sculptor Rudi Lehmann 1959-60 St. Martin’s School of Art and Slade School of Art, London. Studies with Anthony Caro, Reg Butler 1972 Returns to Israel. Lives in Tel Aviv Selected one man exhibitions 60’S 1965 Kadishman, Sculptures – Grosvenor Gallery, London. Curator Charles Spencer Harlow Arts Festival – Harlow, England 1967 Dunkelman Gallery, Toronto 1968 Edinburgh International Festival – Goldbergs & The Richard Demarco Gallery 70’S 1970 Menashe Kadishman /Yellow Forest– Jewish Museum, New York. Cur. Tejas Englesmith, asso. curator Edward Fry 1971 The J.L. Hudson Gallery, Detroit, Michigan 1972 Menashe Kadishman, Concepts and their realization – Mus. Haus Lange, Krefeld. Cur. Paul Wember Yellow Square, Valley of the Cross, Jerusalem 1975Canvas Forest/Laundry– Israel Museum, Jerusalem. Curator Yona Fisher Menashe Kadishman : Glass – Julie M. Gallery, Tel Aviv 1976 M. Kadishman : Glass – Rina Gallery, New York 1977 Unicorn Gallery, Copenhagen 1978The Venice Biennale, The Israeli Pavilion. Curator Amnon Barzel 1979 The Kadishman Connection – Israel Mus., Jerusalem. Curators Stephanie Rachum, Nurit Shilo-Cohen 80’S Sara Levi Gallery, Tel Aviv 1981 Argaman Gallery, Tel Aviv The Yellow Sheep and the Metal Grove 1956-81 – University of Haifa Art Gallery. Cur. Ilana Ortar Kadishman : Paintings 1979-1981 – Tel Aviv Museum. Curator Sara Breitberg-Semel 1982 Kadishman 1982 – Julie M. Gallery, Tel Aviv Sara Gilat Gallery, Jerusalem Art 13’82, International Art Fair, Basel (by Goldman Gallery) 1983 Mulenberg College, Allentown, Pennsylvania International Art Fair, Chicago (by Goldman Gallery) 1984 Julie M. Gallery, Tel Aviv Gallery 99, Miami Gallerie Fabien Boulakia, Paris 1985 Kadishman – Tatrama Gallery, Tel Aviv Sacrifice of Isaac– Sculpture and Painting, Jewish Mus., New York. Cur. Susan Goodman. Txts Amnon Barzel, Edward Fry, Nathan Zach Sacrifice of Isaac– 18th Biennale of Sao Paulo. Curator Amnon Barzel Kadishman – P.B.Van Voorst Van Beest Gallery, The Hague, Holland 1986 Kadishman – De Beyerd Centre for Contemporary Art, Breda. Curator Frank Tiesing; The Sculpture Garden, Gemeentemuseum, Arnhem. Curator Liesbeth Brandt-Corstitius; Delta Gallery, Rotterdam, Holland 1987 Nohra Haime Gallery, New York Myth transformed : Painting and Monumental Sculpture of Menashe Kadishman – Tel Aviv Museum. Curator Edward Fry Sculpture – ‘The sacrifice of Isaac’, Tel Aviv Museum Plaza 1988 Menashe Kadishman Paintings – Lehigh University Art Galleries, Bethlehem, Penn. Cur. Ricardo Viera Menashe Kadishman, Opferung Isaaks – Kammermusiksaal, Berlin. Curator Julie Mamon Die Opferung Isaaks Gouachen – Kniestedter Kirche, Stadt Museum, Salzgitter, Germany 1988-89Menashe Kadishman New Sculpture and Painting – Nohra Haime Gallery, New York. text by Ed Fry 1989 FIAC 89 – Galerie Heyram-Mabel Semmler, Paris 90’S 1990 Menashe Kadishman 1990 – Julie M. Gallery, Tel Aviv Menashe Kadishman, Small Sculpture – Nohra Haime Gallery, New York Birthand Other Sculptures, 1988-1990 – The Israel Museum, Jerusalem. Cur. Yigal Zalmona Menashe Kadishman “Schapen kijken ons aan” – Galerie Kadans, Haag, Holland 1992 Sculpture and Drawings – Annely Juda Fine Art, London Menashe Kadishman – Model and Language – The New Workshop for Arts’ Ramat Eliahu, Rishon Le Zion Municipality, Israel. text: Ami Schteinitz 1993 Hans Mayer Gallery, Dusseldorf, Germany 1994 Luce Del Mattino -History and Nature/ The Gori Collection – Fattoria di Celle / Spazi d’Arte, Pistoia, Italy Menashe Kdishman Curated by Hilgemann – Gallery Art Affairs, Amsterdam, Holland Faret Tachikawa Art Project, Art Front Hillside Gallery, Tokyo. Curator Fram Kitagawa. Txt Pierre Restany Drawing – Sculpture – Haifa Auditorium, Haifa Municipality. Curator Irit Miller Floor sculpture – Antin Square, The Genia Schreiber University Art Gallery, Tel Aviv University Menashe Kadishman Memories from Venice -Art Focus, Mahanaim Gallery, Israel 1995 Menashe Kadishman Drawings and Sculptures – Artists House, Tel Aviv. Curator Irit Miller Menashe Kadishman – Julie M. Gallery Kadishman in Galilee – The Israeli Art Galleries – Cabri – Lochamei Hagetaot – Metzuba – Rosh Hanikra, Israel. Cur. Noa Melamed, Rivka Sinai, Kerni Am-Ad, Drora Dekel 1996 Menashe Kadishman – Art Front Gallery, Tokyo, Japan. Curator Fram Kitagawa. txt Pierre Restany Menashe Kadishman, /Nachshon Gallery, /Kibutz Nachshon. Curator: Yael Keini 1997Shalechet- Julie M. Gallery, Tel Aviv Lea Nikel, Paintings / Menashe Kadishman, drawings and Sculptures – Beersheba Visual Art Center. Curator Haim Maor Lea Nikel, Painting / Menashe Kadishman, Sketching & Sculpting – The Gallery on the Cliff, Netanya. Curator Iris Kritzman Abblätterung – Affoliation – Shalechet – Hans Mayer Gallery, Dusseldorf, Germany The Herd – National Art Gallery of China, Beijing. On behalf of Ora Namir Valley of Sadness – Tal der Traurigkeit – Dominican Cloister, Braunschweig, Germany 1998 Menashe Kadishman-Shalechet – Gallery Art Affairs, Amsterdam De Beyerd, Breda, Holland. Curator Frank Tiesing Valley of Sadness -Roemer und Pelizaeus Museum, Hildesheim, Germany The Herd – Guangdong Museum of Art, Guangzhou, China The Herd – Guan Shanyue Museum of Art, Shenzen, China The Herd – National Art Gallery, Bangkok, Thailand. Curator Iris Kritzman Menashe Kadishman – Shalechet – Austellungraum Hans Mayer, Berlin Menashe Kadishman – Image 1978-98- The Different Gallery, Tel-Aviv. Cur. Reviva Regev 1999 Sculpture ‘Der Kuss’ – Strasse der Sculpturen Paris-Moskow, Skulpturenweg Salzgitter-Bad & Braunschwig Cloister, Germany. Curator Gerd Winner Shalechet – Suermondt Ludwig Museum, Aachen, Germany. Curator Ulrich Schneider Homage to Bela and Ben Zion Kadishman, Beit Ouri and Rami Nechustan Museum, Kibutz Sdot Yaacov Meouhad, Israel. Curators Aviva Meromi, Ruth Shadmon The Herd – Menashe Kadishman – Singapore Art Museum, Singapore Painting Peace For ‘The Sons of Abraham’ – Givatayim Theatre, Tel Aviv. Curator Doron Polak Sculpture ‘Scream’ – Lola Beer Ebner Sculpture Garden, Tel Aviv Museum of Art 2000’S 2000 De Kudde – The Flock – Vleeshal, Frans Halsmuseum, Haarlem, Holland. Curator Mabel Hoogendonk Installation‘Morning Light’- Savonlinna Fortress, Helsinki, Finland The Herd– Ahouzat Bait Gallery, Raanana, Israel. Curator Bettine Amir Sculpture ‘Birds’, Shiba Hospital, Tel Hashomer, Israel Avraham Binder / Menashe Kadishman Homage to the artist – Artists House, Tel Aviv. Cur. Hanna Kopler 2001 Menashe Kadishman –Herd”– Beit Kener, Rishon Lezion, Israel. Curator Lea Topler Sculpture – The Family Plaza, Yad Vashem, Jerusalem Sculpture ‘My Silent Brother’, Memorial to Amir Meir- Raanana, Israel Sculpture ‘Motherland Landscape’ – Bank Hapoalim, Kikar Rabin, Tel-Aviv Permanent installation ‘Shalechet’ – Jewish Museum, Berlin 2002 Julie M. Gallery, Tel Aviv Menashe Kadishman – Women, The New Gallery Avni Institute,Tel-Aviv. Curator: Galia Yahav Menashe Kadishman ‘in the Valley of Sorrow’ – Kibutz Gallery Rosh Hanikra, Kibutz Lohamei Hagetaot Gallery, Israel. Curators Rivka Sinai, Tova Haverdi Kadishman in White – The Gallery of the Art Workshop, Yavne. Cur: Irit Levin,Doron Pollack The Herd– Okashi Museum of Art, old Acre, Israel. Curator Rachel Zemer 2003 Kadishman’s Herd in the Carmel – Hamud Elkara Gallery, Daliat Al Carmel, Israel. Curator Iris Kritzman Menashe Kadishman Moledet Motherland – Galerie im Prediger Schwaebisch Gmuend, Germany. Curator Gabriele Holthuis Drawings for the book “You Should Ring Twice”, by Natan Alterman, The Holon Theatre Gallery, Holon 2005 Kadishman Returns to the Valley – The Municipal Gallery Afula. Curator Shila Dvor Casdi Menashe Kadishman – Tel Aviv Museum of Art. Curator Mordechai Omer Menashe Kadishman / Prints – The Genia Schreiber University Art Gallery, Tel Aviv. Curators Mordechai Omer, Irit Tal 2006 Sculpture – Ramat Gan Menashe Kadishman – Art Gallery Hamud Al-Kara, Daliat el Carmel. Curator Zvika Israel Beit Gabriel, Kinneret, Israel. Curator Gideon Efrat Sculptures from the Storage – Office in Tel Aviv Gallery, Tel Aviv. Curator Rachel Sukman *** Famed Israeli artist Menashe Kadishman dies aged 82 Israel Prize winner was best known for series of sheep sculptures and portraits, and numerous public artworks in Israel and abroad ByJONATHAN BECK 8 May 2015, 10:02 pm1 1,194 shares Menashe Kadishman in the Tel Aviv Museum next to some of his iconic sheep on May 15, 2007. (photo credit: Moshe Shai/Flash90) Israel Prize-winning sculptor and painter Menashe Kadishman passed away on Friday evening. He was 82 years old. Kadishman was best known for his repeated rendering of a sheep’s head, at once a symbol of the spirit of the pioneers who built the modern state of Israel and a reference to the biblical sacrifice of Isaac. Kadishman was born in the British Mandate Palestine in 1932. His father, who was a pioneer, died when Kadishman was 15 years old. The young Menashe left school to help his mother with housework and to earn money. Get The Times of Israel's Daily Edition by email and never miss our top stories FREE SIGN UP When he joined the IDF, he was among the first conscripts to serve in the recently established Nahal Brigade, whose conscripts were posted in kibbutzim and budding periphery communities. Kadishman was posted in Kibbutz Ma’ayan Baruch in northern Israel. He worked also in herding sheep and it was there that his obsession with this theme emerged. He studied sculpture with Moshe Sternschuss and between 1959 and 1960 attended the St. Martin’s School of Art and the Slade School in London. Menashe Kadishman’s Binding of Isaac sculpture outside the Tel Aviv Museum (photo credit: CC BY-SA GFDL, Wikimedia Commons) While his drawings and paintings tend to representation, his sculpture is often severely abstract. He also used materials like steel and iron, sometimes allowing the metal to rust in a way which became part of the final outcome. He was influenced by Picasso in his sculpture and in his painting by the likes of Matisse and the Fauves, a French movement from the first half of the 20th century. Kadishman represented Israel at the Kassel Dokumenta in 1968 and again at the Venice Biennale in 1978. He won numerous awards during his life — most notably the Israel Prize in 1995. From 1995 he began an immense series of sheep portraits; large-scale paintings which show a sheep’s head painted in a free style, often with striking colors. He became so identified with the sheep pieces that he even starred (as himself) in a TV ad for Israel’s national lottery as a Michelangelo-like figure sculpting a huge stone sheep in the middle of Tel Aviv. Among his famous pieces is the epic piece Ascension — a series of three large iron disks standing diagonally. The piece is on permanent display in the plaza of Habima theater. Other works are located all around the country, including in the plaza of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, the Weizmman Science Institute in Rehovot, the Teffen Technological Park and others. A poignant massive public piece is featured in the Berlin Jewish Museum. A large space contains 10,000 semi-abstract “masks” of screaming faces cast in metal. When the spectator walks across the space, the metals rub against each other and make screeching scream-like noises. Kadishman was divorced. He left behind a son, Ben, who is a painter, and a daughter, Maya, an actress. **** Menashe Kadishman, famed Israeli artist, dies at 82 Kadishman died after he was hospitalized at Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer. ByJPOST.COM STAFFMAY 8, 2015 20:55 Menashe Kadishman (photo credit: Wikimedia Commons) Menashe Kadishman, the world-renowned painter, sculptor, and Israel Prize laureate, died on Friday at the age of 82. Kadishman died after he was hospitalized at Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer. Read More Related Articles Disney to shut California parks through March over What does Israel's future 5G network have to do with Recommended by Over the past 60 years the Tel Aviv-born Kadishman created a significant body of sculptures, paintings, conceptual pieces and graphic prints. Awarded the Israel Prize in 1995, Kadishman was, most of the time, an establishment favorite who gained international recognition and played a significant role in advancing the cause of Israeli art. The Tel Aviv Museum of Art presented a long overdue, wide-ranging retrospective of Kadishman's works, assembled chronologically. They date from his earliest student trials to his latest unstretched canvases based on important 19th-century paintings, mostly by Van Gogh and Millet. Kadishman's impressive career began with a solid foundation in sculpture. After studying with Moshe Sternschuss and Rudi Lehmann, he attended St. Martin's and the Slade in London during the early 1960s, where he was properly introduced to the tools and the aesthetics of the trade as indicated in this show by a group of hand modeled bronze maquettes of distinctive archaic altars and arches. Soon after attending the classes of Anthony Caro, his work took a constructivist, near minimalist, turn. Latest articles from Jpost TOP ARTICLES 1/5 READ MORE 154 Israelis infected with , over 38,000 in quarantine During his minimalist phase Kadishman investigated the possibility of freeing geometric forms from their apparent weightiness by creating a vision of mass floating in space. *** The Old Master Of Tel Aviv Joseph HoffmanFebruary 18, 2005 When you are at the top of your profession, enjoy an international reputation in the art world and have achieved financial success and critical acclaim, what do you do for an encore? That’s the question that faces Menashe Kadishman, arguably Israel’s most brilliant artistic export. His works can be found in New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., and in London’s Tate Gallery. He has been exhibited from Japan to Uruguay and in practically all of Western Europe. He has won numerous prizes and honors, including the Israel Prize in 1995. Kadishman’s worldwide renown rests squarely on the backs of sheep. At the 1978 Venice Biennale, the former kibbutz-shepherd stole the show by making a work of art using a flock of live sheep whose backs had been painted with various colors. With the sheep as the subject matter, the sheep pen becomes a picture frame, and the animals become swirls of color constantly moving throughout the canvas. Offering a quirky take on “action painting,” Kadishman is no doubt the first artist to conceive of colors that behave, well, sheepishly. For many, their appeal lies in a combination of innocence and irreverence. Culture is defined, so goes a joke of the mid-20th century, as the ability to listen to the “William Tell Overture” without thinking of “The Lone Ranger.” Similarly, there is hardly an Israeli art lover who can think of sheep without conjuring up Kadishman. “In each Christian house, there is a Santa Maria. So in each Jewish home, there will be a sheep. “What’s wrong with that?” the artist asked. The sheep are his most popular and, at the same time, most harshly criticized works. Some see them as a fetish, others find them merely shtick, but most realize that Kadishman has created an instantly recognizable oeuvre. Picasso has his cubist two-eyed profiles, Alfred Hitchcock appears in his own films, Elton John flaunts his oversized eyeglasses and Menashe Kadishman herds his flock across the artistic landscape. And he has raised these wooly creatures to pop-icon status, offering thousands of paintings of them. If the artist puts himself to sleep by counting sheep, he never would need to count the same wooly creature twice. Though most see the sheep as his most famous work, Kadishman himself identifies the moment of his own success to have come in 1970, when he offered “Trees,” an exhibit at New York’s Jewish Museum. The artist filled nearby Central Park with cast-iron rectangular sheets painted yellow, the same yellow found throughout the city on taxicabs, street signs and traffic lights. The polished sheets reflected the shadows of the trees and seemed to be quite at home in the urban parkscape, a modest merger of technology and nature. Kadishman, famous for his ample girth, still sports a full beard and a head of curly, unruly hair. At 72, he is grayer now, and his fierce lionlike look is softer, sleepier. He growls less often. As before, he has a warm, welcoming smile. “Well, you can still see I’m working every day,” Kadishman said as he gestured expansively in his overcrowded Tel Aviv studio, coming to rest on his latest effort, a model for an ambitious sculpture dedicated to Israel’s pre-state military underground. Commissioned by the Municipality of Ramat-Gan, the piece is a 4-meter-high iron sculpture paying tribute to the Hagana, Lehi and Etzel. The final design shows an upside-down figure whose feet support a plateau of land on which grow three cypresses. Off to the side, a female flutist sits. The upside-down grimacing man was born from a poem by Uri Zvi Greenberg about a World War I soldier shot dead while scaling a barbed-wire fence, his feet silhouetted against the night sky. Kadishman’s warrior lies under the ground, his sacrifice becoming the nation’s building blocks. Nourished by his body, the land is regenerated. The plan is monumental, literally and figuratively. It will be erected in a circular plaza with three new streets leading up to it, each one named for one of the movements. “Actually I have two final versions. In one, the three cypresses are on the same level ground; in the other, they are set on the side of a hill,” he said. “I’m going to go with the level trees. Otherwise the movements will start to argue whose cypress is the highest.” And that’s only part of his activity. He will have a major retrospective at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art next year, a documentary film about him is under way, his images have been requested for a forthcoming book on Jewish art and culture, and he is still exhibiting new work all over the world. His most recent exhibit was “Shalechet” (“Falling Leaves”), an installation that toured Germany, the Low Countries and Israel before reaching its permanent home in Berlin’s Jewish Museum. The installation is composed of more than 20,000 iron heads scattered helter-skelter on the floor. Wall to wall, these groaning faces — 5 pounds and approximately 5 inches in diameter each — represent Holocaust souls who demand their stories be told and their spilled blood avenged. The spectator is invited to walk through this rocky beach of suffering humanity. Kadishman recently sat down with the Forward for a talk on his life and work, and he brought to the table the wit and insight that have become almost as trademark as his sheep. Forward: How do you react to criticism? Menashe Kadishman: Look, any artist over 60 should just paint for himself and not give a damn about criticism! Forward: So you don’t give a damn? MK: Almost. Forward: How do you wish to be remembered? MK: [With] a museum. Forward: Like the ones to Reuven Rubin and Nahum Gutman? MK: Yes. At least. Forward: Who influenced you most when you were a student? MK: Henry Moore. Someone once asked him, “Why do you make small heads and holes in the belly? Maybe you should go to a psychiatrist.” Moore responded, “If I go see a psychiatrist, maybe I wouldn’t do it anymore.” Forward: When did you make it as an artist? MK: I received a sculpture prize in Paris in 1967, but it wasn’t until 1970 when I did my “Trees” in Central Park that I became famous. Forward: Compare then and now. MK: I think the 1960s was a better period. People had hopes for good things. Now it looks like the world stinks. Forward: Isn’t this a result of your getting older? MK: Yes, to some degree. When we were young we wanted our art to change the world. But when Hitler bombed Guernica, did Picasso’s painting have any effect? I thought that maybe some things of mine could do good. My sculptures didn’t change the war in Lebanon. Maybe art is not about changing anything. It’s about telling you reality. Forward: Where does the artist rank in Israeli society today? MK: No one wants to hear the opinion of an artist. Even football players are more important than us. Forward: What makes a great work of art? MK: Recently I went to the Prado, where I saw a Goya painting of a snowstorm. I got cold standing in front of it. Forward: Any regrets or missteps? MK: My mistake, if you can call it that, was to come back to Israel. It was [American sculptor] George Segal who told me if I had stayed in New York, I could have become one of the great American artists. But I really have nothing to kvetch about. When I lived in Chelsea [in the 1980s], I would walk down 23rd Street and maybe get a nod or two. But here in Israel, when I stroll down Dizengoff Street, I’m treated just like an Old Master. 4836


Original Hand Signed Sheep Illustration Israel Menashe Kadishman Hebrew Book:
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