Rare Civil War Soldiers Chair 103rd Regiment New York Volunteers Seward Antietam




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Rare Civil War Soldiers Chair 103rd Regiment New York Volunteers Seward Antietam:
$1000.0


A beautiful chair that was owned by Civil War veteran Lucius L. Flower who served at Antietam, Fredericksburg, and other famous battles. Great condition for a piece of its age, with some very light wear and patina. Solid and sturdy. See pics for more detail. We are totally in the dark on value of such a historical piece, so all reasonable offers will be considered. Below is various information on his life and service in the Civil War and in the veterans association afterwards. He is shown in the group photo, but we haven’t been able to tell exactly which one is him from our quick research. The photo and text are from a book about the “Seward Infantry”, which can be seen in more detail here: LUCIUS L. FLOWER was born in 1842, in Newark, N.Y. In 1868 he married Miss Stella S. Coles, who died in 1876. In 1877 he married Miss Wilhelmina Verscelius, of Watkins, N.Y. He enlisted in 1862 in Company I 103d N.Y. volunteers ("Seward Regiment") and was honorably discharged in 1865. In 1866 he located in Tioga county, and, with Lucius Flower, his father, and Stephen Wartons, he built a steam saw-mill. In 1871 they built another further along Lamb's Creek, which they still carry on. [SRGP 85937] 103rd Regiment Infantry "Seward Infantry" Organized at New York City November, 1861, to March, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., March 5, 1862, thence moved to Norfolk, Va., March 21, and to New Berne, N. C., April. Attached to Norfolk, Va., Dept. of Virginia, to April, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Dept. of North Carolina, to July, 1862. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1863. Alvord's Brigade, Vodges' Division, Folly Island, S.C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to February, 1864. 2nd Brigade, Gordon's Division, Folly Island, S.C., Northern District, to April, 1864. Folly Island, S.C., Northern District, Dept. of the South, to August, 1864. 3rd Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to September, 1864. 1st Brigade, Kitching's Division (Provisional), Army of the Shenandoah, to December, 1864. 1st Brigade, Provisional Division, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to March, 1865. 1st Brigade, Infantry Division, Defenses of Bermuda Hundred, Va., to May, 1865. Dept. of Virginia to December, 1865. SERVICE.--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until March 21, 1862, and at Norfolk, Va., until April, 1862. Ordered to New Berne, N. C., and duty there until July. Action at Gillett's Farm, Pebbly Run, April 13. Haughton's Mills April 27. Moved to Newport News, Va., July 2-6, thence to Aquia Creek and Fredericksburg, Va., August 2-6. Duty there until August 31. Moved to Washington, D.C., August 31-September 3. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battles of South Mountain September 14; Antietam September 16-17. Duty at Pleasant Valley, Md., until October 27. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 27-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. Moved to Newport News, Va., February 6-9, thence to Suffolk March 13, and duty there until June. Siege of Suffolk April 12-May 4. Edenton Road April 24. Suffolk May 2-4. Providence Church Road May 3. Dix's Peninsula Campaign June 24-July 7. Expedition from White House to South Anna River July 1-7. Ordered to Folly Island, S.C., July 28, Siege operations against Forts Wagner and Gregg on Morris Island and against Fort Sumter and Charleston, S.C., August 14-September 7. Bombardment of Fort Sumter August 17-23. Capture of Forts Wagner and Gregg September 7. Operations against Charleston and duty on Folly Island, S.C., September, 1863, to August, 1864. Demonstrations on James Island May 21-22 and July 1-10, 1864. Ordered to Washington, D.C., August, 1864, and duty there until September 27. Ordered to the Shenandoah Valley, Va., September 27, and duty there until November 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Ordered to Bermuda Hundred, Va., November 22, and duty in the defenses at that point to March, 1865. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond December, 1864, to April, 1865. Fall of Petersburg and Richmond April 2-3. Duty in the Dept. of Virginia until December, 1865. Mustered out December 7, 1865. Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 61 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 100 Enlisted men by disease. Total 168. History Mustered in: November 1861 to March 1862. Mustered out: December 7, 1865. The following is taken from New York in the War of the Rebellion, 3rd ed. Frederick Phisterer. Albany: J. B. Lyon Company, 1912. This regiment, Col. Baron Fred. W. Von Egloffstein, was organized in New York city March I, 1862, by the consolidation of the 3d Regiment German Rifles, Col. Casper Schneider, with the Seward Infantry, Colonel von Egloffstein. It was mustered in the service of the United States between November, 1861, and March, 1862, for three years. Company C was mustered out May 8, 1862. At the expiration of its term of enlistment the men entitled thereto were, under Col. William Heine, honorably discharged at New York city, and the regiment retained in service, but March 4, 1865, consolidated into three companies, A, B and C. The companies were recruited principally: A, Grenadiers, in New York city; B, C— Corps d'Elite—D, E, F — 3d German Rifles, G, H, I and K — Baker's Rifles and New York Battery, at Elmira. The regiment left the State March 5, 1862; served at Washington, D. C, from March 6, 1862; at Norfolk, Va., from March 21, 1862; in the 1st Brigade, 2d Division, Department North Carolina, from April, 1862; in 1st Brigade, 3d Division, 9th Corps, from July, 1862; at Suffolk, 7th Corps, Department of Virginia, from April, 1863; on the Peninsula, Va., in 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 7th Corps, in June and July, 1863; in the Department of the South, in Alford's Brigade, ad Division, 18th Corps, from August, 1863; same brigade, Vogdes' Division, 10th Corps, from October, 1863, on Folly and Little Folly Island, S. C.; in 2d Brigade, De Russey's Division, 22d Corps, from August, 1864; in 1st Brigade, Provisional Division, with the Army of the Shenandoah from September 22, 1864; in the 1st Brigade, Ferrero's Division, Army of the James, at Bermuda Hundred, Va., from December, 1864; in the Department of Virginia from April, 1865; and it was honorably discharged and mustered out, under Capt. Wm. Redlich, December 7, 1865, at City Point, Va. During its service the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 1 officer, 48 enlisted men; of wounds received in action, 3 officers, 13 enlisted men; of disease and other causes, 3 officers, 100 enlisted men; total, 7 officers, 161 enlisted men; aggregate, 168; of whom 5 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy. The following is taken from The Union army: a history of military affairs in the loyal states, 1861-65 -- records of the regiments in the Union army -- cyclopedia of battles -- memoirs of commanders and soldiers. Madison, WI: Federal Pub. Co., 1908. volume II. One Hundred and Third Infantry.—Cols., Baron Fred W. Von Egloffstein, Benjamin Ringold, Wilhelm Heine; Lieut.-Cols., Kas-per Schneider, Julius C. Kretschmar, Julius E. Quentin, Andreas Wettstien; Majs., Julius C. Kretschmar, Julius E. Quentin, Benja~ min Ringold, Joseph Morrison. This regiment, known as the Sew-ard infantry, recruited in the counties of New York and Chemung and organized at New York city, March I, 1862, was mustered into the U. S. service from Nov. 1861, to March, 1862, for three years. Co. C was mustered out May 8, 1862. On the expiration of its term of service the original members (except veterans) were mustered out at New York city, under Col. Heine, and the veterans and recruits were consolidated on March 4, 1865, into a battalion of three companies. This battalion was retained in service until Dec. 7, 1865, when it was mustered out, under Capt. William Red-lichj at City Point, Va. The regiment left the state on March 5, 1862, and was stationed for a month at Washington and Norfolk, when it was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2nd division, Department of North Carolina, and took part in the actions at Foy's plantation, Fort Macon, Gillett's farm, Haughton's mill and Dismal swamp, N. C. When the 9th corps was formed in July, 1862, the 103d was assigned to the 1st brigade, 3d division, and moved with the corps, under Maj.-Gen. Reno, on McClellan's Maryland campaign in September. It was heavily engaged at Antietam, losing 117 officers and men in killed, wounded and missing, its severest loss being incurred in the gallant charge at the stone bridge. Among the mortally wounded were Capts. Henry A. Sand and William Brandt. On Nov. 15 it was engaged at Fayetteville, and lost 25 in killed, wounded and missing at the battle of Fredericksburg in December. With the 7th corps it took part in the siege of Suffolk in the spring of 1863, and lost 20 in killed, wounded and missing at Providence Church road, Col. Ringold being among the killed. In August it was ordered to South Carolina, where it took part in the siege of Fort Wagner and the subsequent operations about Charleston harbor. During the actions on James island, in May, June and July, 1864, it lost 45 men in killed, wounded and missing. In Dec., 1864, it was assigned to the 1st brigade, Ferrero's division, Army of the James, at Bermuda Hundred, Va., and took part in the siege of Petersburg until its fall on April 2, 1865, but sustained no further losses in battle. During its term of service it lost 4 officers and 61 men killed and mortally wounded; 3 officers and 100 men died of disease and other causes, a total of 7 officers and 161 men. FLOWER Lucius L. Flower [SRGP 85937], for many years a resident of this place, an uncle of Edwin S. Coles, publisher of the Mansfield Advertiser, died in Corning on Saturday, aged 85 years. He was the father of Dr. Edith Flower, who practiced medicine here for many years. Mr. Flower was a veteran of the Civil War, having enlisted at the age of 19 years, Jan. 24, 1862. He was a member of the 103rd Regt., NY Vols. He participated in the following battles: Fox’s plantation, NC, Gillett’s Farm, NC, Houghton’s Mills, NC, Hatteras Islands, Antietam, MD, Fredericksburg, VA, Suffolk, VA, Providence, Church Roads, VA, Fort Sumter, Bermuda and Petersburg, VA. His wife, Miss Stella Coles, died in 1876. – Wellsboro Gazette, September 8, 1927 FLOWER – Lucius Leonard Flower [SRGP 85937], died at 7:15 o’clock Saturday morning, Sept. 3 [1927], of heart disease. He was born at Newark Valley, October 28, 1842, the only son of Clara Hoagland and Lucius Leonard Flower. At the age of 19, on January 24, 1862, he enlisted in Elmira in the 103rd Regt., NY Vols. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Wilhelmina V. Flower; his daughter, Dr. Edith Flower Wheeler, of Cortland, NY, formerly of Mansfield, and son, T. Albert Flower, of Painted Post. The funeral was held Monday; interment in Prospect cemetery at Mansfield. – Wellsboro Agitator, September 7, 1927 FLOWER Lucius Leonard [SRGP 86433] 1869 30 JUN D Flower, Lucius Leonard The following was abstracted from a letter to the Editor: Lucius Leonard Flower of Lamb's Creek, Pa., late of Schuyler co., NY; eldest son of Alfred Flower of Feeding Hills, Mass., the first of a family of seven children to meet the sainted mother in heaven. God helps the wife, the only child, the sister and brothers. Letter dated May 19th 1869 and signed by Hattie L. Flower, Feeding Hills, Mass ONE HUNDRED AND THIRD REGIMENT, SEWARD INFANTRY." At the time of the breaking out of the war there was a "commercial college" in the third story of the building on Water street opposite the Rathbun House, one of the teachers being William M. Crosby. During the latter part of the year 1861 this gentleman began to raise a company of young men, some of whom were connected with the school. George T. Dudley, who had gone out with K .Company of the Twentythird Regiment, being home on leave, assisted in the organization of the company and was made its first lieutenant. His brother, William L., was made second lieutenant. The company was mustered in as K Company, One Hundred and Third Regiment, “ Seward Infantry,” Col. the Baron Frederick W. V. Egloffstein. It was all recruited in Elmira : Company K.--Captain, William M. Crosby; first lieutenant, George T. Dudley ; second lieutenant, William L. Dudley; first sergeant, Simeon E. L. Wilbur; sergeants, De Witt C. Wilbur, Henry Magee, Ho ner S. Case, John A. Carey; corporals, Orville S. Kimball, Horace H. Bolt, Henry O. Wilbur, William Kress, James H. Stoughton, Moses L. Dean, Isaac T. German, Daniel La Due; inusicians, Milton T. Tyrell, Daniel H. Carey; wagoner, John P. Johnson; privates, John E. Ames, Oliver II. P. Babcock, George W. Bennett, Aaron C. Bryant, Jesse S. Buchanan, William W. Bullard, James W. Burnham, John Chase, Richard W. Christler, Charles Conklin, Thomas Cuddeback, Alfred H. Cummins, John Wilson Curtis, Elijah B. Cooper, Daniel C. Dean, Benjamin Denison, Edward A. Denison, Dan Milon Dickenson, Henry C. Dunham, Wheeler J. Eddy, John Ellis, Jonathan N. Fletcher, Lucius L. Flower, Deland IIull, Emanuel Harpending, Gardiner C. Hibbard, Richard Hill, Albert S. Hovey, George W. Jackson, Harlan P. Kimball, Henry Lamoreaux, Andrew J. Leonard, Timothy W. Leonard, Gardner A. Longwell, James C. Lormer, James L. Millard, Thadeus C. Miller, IIerman E. Jilleman, James Milleman, Joshua F. Norris, Emerson F. Orvis, Charles T. Ostrander, Samuel A. Paine, David N. Paddock, Charles L. Perry, Lorenzo T. Perry, James Post, John Reed, Isaac V. Seeley, Stephen Sherman, George J. Simson, Frank Smith, Reuben D. W. Smith, Thomas S. Smith, Clark H. Stage, Jacob Stage, Isaac N. Storm, Harry L. Stillwill, William S. Snick, William J. Sutherland, Edgar F. Tyrrell, Henry D. Vangorder, James S. Vallentine, William Van Houten, Joseph Wade, Herman H. Wager, James Ward, Fernando Wescott, George L. Wheeler, Orin B. Whitney, Nathan Wood, Nathan W. Yoder. Capt. William M. Crosby is now living in Binghamton at an advanced age. First Lieut. George T. Dudley was a brother of James T. Dudley, who was the junior member of the old bookselling firm of Preswick & Dudley, the successors of the older firm of Sickles & Preswick, and the predecessors of the later firms of Preswick, Morse & Co., Morse, Baker & Hall, and the present Morse, Hall & Loring. Lieutenant Dudley at the time of the breaking out of the war was in his brother's book store. He is now and has been for years in the Postoffice Department at Washington. Second Lieut. William L. Dudley died in the service at Hatteras, N. C. The family is a Chemung County family, the father, Ward Dudley, having been for years a resident of Horseheads. Other names of members of this company will be readily recognized as belonging to citizens of the county now in good repute and standing, among them ex-Alderman Hibbard and Emerson Orvis, of the Fifth ward, and Judge John A. Carey, of Chemung.

Rare Civil War Soldiers Chair 103rd Regiment New York Volunteers Seward Antietam:
$1000.0

Buy Now