Rare Group Of 12 Glass Stereoviews Of The Signal Hill Oilfield, California 1923


Rare Group Of 12 Glass Stereoviews Of The Signal Hill Oilfield, California 1923

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Rare Group Of 12 Glass Stereoviews Of The Signal Hill Oilfield, California 1923:
$149


Rare group of 12 unique glass stereoviews of the Signal Hill Oilfield, California 1923Dimensions 2.75" x 5.9" inches / 7 x 15 cm
Titled in Dutch:
  1. Signal Hill Oilfield, Bosch van boortorens
  2. Signal Hill Oilfield, Gezicht op Long Beach (View on Long Beach)
  3. Signal Hill Oilfield, Feld Scrubber
  4. Signal Hill Oilfield, Gas Absorbers
  5. Signal Hill Oilfield, Feld Scrubber
  6. Signal Hill Oilfield, Absorptie, Braun Oil Cooler
  7. Signal Hill Oilfield, Gas Absorbers
  8. Signal Hill Oilfield, Absorption Plant, Braun Condensors
  9. Signal Hill Oilfield, Spuiter Andrews (sprayer)
  10. Signal Hill Oilfield, Pas aangeboorde spuiter (recently drilled sprayer)
  11. Signal Hill Oilfield, Boorterrein, spuiter Andrews
  12. Signal Hill Oilfield, Mess House

A collection of unique amateur views
Shipping US$ 35
Keywords: USA Oil Industry Drilling Shell
In the summer of 1921, the Signal Hill oil discovery would help make California the source of one-quarter of the world’s entire oil output. Soon known as “Porcupine Hill,” the town’s Long Beach oilfield south of Los Angeles was producing almost 260,000 barrels of oil every day by 1923.
Signal Hill, a growing residential area prior to the 1921 discovery of the Long Beach oilfield, would have so many derricks people would call it Porcupine Hill. “Today you can see wonderful commemorative art displays of this era throughout the lush parks and walkways of Signal Hill,” notes a local newspaper.
At 2300 Skyline Drive atop Signal Hill, California, two bronze roughnecks commemorate the men who brought petroleum wealth to the state following a 1921 oilfield discovery.
“Tribute to the Roughnecks” by Cindy Jackson stands atop Signal Hill. Long Beach is in the distance.signal hill oilSignal Hill circa 1930 – at the corner of 1st Street and Belmont Street. Photo courtesy of the Seaver Center for Western History Research, Los Angeles Museum of Natural History.The Alamitos No. 1 well erupted “black gold” in June 1921, announcing discovery of California’s prolific Long Beach field.The natural gas pressure is so great the oil gusher climbed 114 feet into the air. The well produced almost 600 barrels a day when completed on June 25. It will eventually produce 700,000 barrels.The giant oilfield Alamitos No. 1 still produces 1.5 million barrels of oil a year. Signal Hill incorporated three years after the Alamitos discovery well.Signal Hill remains the only city in America completely surrounded by another city – Long Beach. More than one billion barrels of oil have been pumped from the Long Beach oilfield since the original 1921 strike.“Signal Hill is the scene of feverish activity, of an endless caravan of automobiles coming and going, of hustle and bustle, of a glow of optimism,” reported California Oil World.“Derricks are being erected as fast as timber reaches the ground,” the magazine adds. “New companies are coming in overnight. Every available piece of acreage on and about Signal Hill is being signed up.”signal hill oilDerricks were so close to one cemetery that graves “generated royalty checks to next-of-kin when oil was drawn from beneath family plots,” notes one historian. By 1923, production would reach 259,000 barrels per day from nearly 300 wells. Above, a detail from a panorama from the Library of Congress collection.signal hill oilSignal Hill’s Discovery Well Park includes the Alamitos Number 1 well and memorial at the corner of Temple Ave. and East Hill St. A bronze statue – “Tribute to the Roughnecks” – is nearby on Skyline Drive.Within a year, Signal Hill – before and after a residential area – will have 108 wells, producing 14,000 barrels of oil a day.
There are so many derricks, people are calling it Porcupine Hill.“Derricks are so close that on Willow Street, Sunnyside Cemetery graves generated royalty checks to next-of-kin when oil was drawn from beneath family plots,” notes one historian.Dave Summers notes in his article, “The Oil Beneath California,” that when oilfields around Los Angeles began to develop, “Californian production became a significant player on the national stage.” The OilPrice.com article continues:By 1923 it was producing some 259,000 barrels per day from some 300 wells, in comparison with Huntington Beach, which was then at 113,000 barrels per day and Santa Fe Springs at 32,000 barrels per day… And, in a foreboding of the future problems of over production, this was the first year in a decade that supply exceeded demand.

Rare Group Of 12 Glass Stereoviews Of The Signal Hill Oilfield, California 1923:
$149

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