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Ww1 Wwi Victory Medal Honorable Service Lapel Badge Pin For Sale

Ww1 Wwi Victory Medal Honorable Service Lapel Badge Pin

World War IHonorable Service Victory Medal Lapel Pin You are offerding on an WWI Bronze Honorable Service - Victory Medal Lapel Pin. This is a bronze pin given to servicemen with the World War I Victory Medal and on discharge from service after WWI. See description below. It is a "button hole" lapel pin (designed to fit in the lapel button hole). This badge is 5/8ths inches across. Please see the pictures.

Thanks for looking and good luck offerding.

The pictures below are provided for informational purposes as part of the article. The items pictured are NOT part of this sale.

World War I Victory Lapel Button

Description:

The lapel button is a five-pointed star 5/8-inch in diameter on a wreath with the letters "U.S." in the center.

Criteria:

The World War I Victory Medal was awarded for honorable service for active duty at any time between 6 April 1917 and 11 November 1918. It was also awarded for service between 12 November 1918 and 5 August 1919, with the American Expeditionary Forces in European Russia, and was awarded to the American Expeditionary Forces in Siberia between 23 November 1918 and 1 April 1920.

The lapel button is bronze, except that personnel who were wounded in action were awarded a silver lapel button.

Background:

The medal was established by an Act of Congress, 1919, and promulgated by War Department General Orders 48, 1919, which was rescinded by War Department General Orders 83, 30 Jun 1919.

World War I Victory Medal

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

World War I Victory Medal

The World War I Victory Medal is a decoration of the United States military which was first created in 1919, designed by James Earle Fraser. The medal was originally intended to be created by an act of the United States Congress, however the bill authorizing the decoration never passed, leaving the service departments to create the award through general orders. The United States Army published orders authorizing the World War I Victory Medal in April 1919 and the U.S. Navy followed in June of that same year.

Criteria

Originally known simply as the “Victory Medal”, the World War I Victory Medal was awarded to any member of the U.S. military who had served in the armed forces between the following dates, in the following locations:

In 1945, the World War II Victory Medal was created as the “Victory Ribbon”. Between 1945 and 1947, the two awards were known as the “Victory Medal” and the “Victory Ribbon”. In 1947, when the Victory Ribbon became a full-sized medal as the World War II Victory Medal, the World War I Victory Medal adopted its current name. However, some military records as late as the 1950s continued to annotate the decoration by its previous name, and the medal was often referred to as “Victory Medal (WWI)”.

Devices

To denote battle participation and campaign credit, the World War I Victory was authorized with a large variety of devices to denote specific accomplishments. In order of seniority, the devices authorized to the World War I Victory Medal were as follows:

Silver Citation Star

The Silver Citation Star to the World War I Victory Medal was authorized by the United States Congress on February 4, 1919. A silver star was authorized to be worn on the ribbon of the Victory Medal for any member of the U.S. Army who had been cited for gallantry in action between 1917 and 1920. In 1932, the Silver Citation Star was redesigned and renamed the Silver Star and, upon application to the United States War Department, any holder of the Silver Citation Star could have it converted to a Silver Star Medal.

Navy Commendation Star

The Navy Commendation Star was authorized to any person who had been cited by the Secretary of the Navy for heroic performance of duty during the First World War. The Navy Commendation Star was worn as a silver star on the World War I Victory Medal, identical in appearance to the Army’s Silver Citation Star. Unlike the Army’s version, however, the Navy Commendation Star could not be upgraded to the Silver Star Medal.

Army Battle Clasps

The following battle clasps, inscribed with a battle's name, were worn on the medal to denote participation in major ground conflicts.

For general defense service, not involving a specific battle, the "Defensive Sector" Battle Clasp was authorized. The clasp was also awarded for any battle which was not already recognized by its own battle clasp.

Navy Battle Clasps

Navy battle clasps were issued for naval service in support of army operations and had identical names to the army battle clasps. There was a slight variation of the criteria dates for the Navy battle clasps, as listed below.

The Defensive Sector clasp was also authorized for Navy personnel who had participated in naval combat but were not authorized a particular battle clasp.

Navy Operational Clasps

For sea related war duty, the Navy issued the following operational clasps, which were worn on the World War I Victory Medal and inscribed with the name of the duty type which had been performed:

Army Service Clasps

For non-combat service with the Army during the First World War, the following service clasps were authorized to be worn with the World War I Victory Medal. Each service claps was inscribed with a country or region name where support service was performed. The U.S. Army issued the following service clasps:

Navy Service Clasps

The U.S. Navy issued similar service clasps to the Army for service in the following regions during the following periods:

Campaign Stars

Since battle and service clasps could only be worn on the full-sized World War I Victory Medal, bronze service stars were authorized for wear on the award ribbon. This was the common method of campaign and battle display when wearing the World War I Victory Medal as a ribbon on a military uniform.

Meuse-Argonne Offensive

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Meuse-Argonne Offensive

The Meuse-Argonne Offensive, also called the Battle of the Argonne Forest, was the final offensive of World War I. It was the biggest operation and victory of the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) in that war. The offensive took place in the Verdun Sector, immediately north and northwest of the town of Verdun, between September 26 - November 11, 1918.

Opposing forces

U.S. forces consisted of nine divisions (Paterson, 2005) of the U.S. First Army commanded by General John J. Pershing until October 16 and then by Lt. General Hunter Liggett. More than 1,200,000 U.S. troops eventually took part in the battle. The logistics were planned and directed by Col. George Marshall. German forces consisted of 5 German divisions, 4 of which were described as low grade. Resistance grew to approximately 450,000 German troops from the Fifth Army of Group Gallwitz commanded by General Georg von der Marwitz.

Objective

Its objective was the capture of the railroad hub at Sedan which would break the rail net supporting the German Army in France and Flanders and force the enemy's withdrawal from the occupied territories.

First phase: September 26 to October 3

The American attack began at 5:30 a.m. on September 26 and progressed 11 kilometres (7 mi) in two days. Montfaucon d'Argonne was captured on the first day. On September 29, six new German divisions were deployed to oppose the American attack, and in the words of General Pershing, "We were no longer engaged in a manœuver for the pinching out of a salient, but were necessarily committed, generally speaking, to a direct frontal attack against strong, hostile positions fully manned by a determined enemy."[1]

Second phase: October 4 to October 28

328th Infantry Regiment of 82nd Division line of advance in capture of Hill 223 on October 7, 1918.

The second phase of the battle began on 4 October. The Americans launched a series of costly frontal assaults that finally began broke through the main German defences between 14-17 October. By the end of October the Americans had advanced ten miles and had finally cleared the Argonne Forest. On their left the French had advanced twenty miles, reaching the Aisne River.

Third phase: October 26 to November 10

The American forces reorganized into two armies. The First, led by General Ligett, would continue to move to the Carignan-Sedan-Mezieres Railroad. The Second Army, led by Lieutenant General Robert L. Bullard, was directed to move eastward towards Metz. The two armies faced 31 German divisions.

Shipping discount for multiple purchases as follows: First item is full price shipping, second thru sixth sale/item is an additional $.25. I will not combine ship more than six items/sales at one time. All sales must be won within a 72 hour period. Exceptions are allowed if you email me first. Thanks for looking and good luck!


Ww1 Wwi Victory Medal Honorable Service Lapel Badge Pin

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Ww1 Wwi Victory Medal Honorable Service Lapel Badge Pin:
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