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Ww2 German Luftwaffe Inert Sd2 A Butterfly Bomb *case Only "uncleaned" Condition For Sale

Ww2 German Luftwaffe Inert Sd2 A Butterfly Bomb *case Only

WW2 German/ Luftwaffe SD2 A - Butterfly Bomb Case (from research Ibelieve it to be is this type)

THIS IS THE OUTER CASING ONLY - THE CHARGE WAS REMOVED &DE-ACTIVATED OVER 70 YEARS AGO.

This WW2 German Butterfly Bomb Case was hung up in my late Grandfathers barn at Mile Ham Farm near Laddingford in Kent, from soon after it was found and made safe until my Grandfather retired in 1970.

It had the sides held together under tension with bailing twine roughly half-way closed and hung from a nail knocked into a wooden beam.

I believe it had been dropped on or near the farm but how it was disarmed I never got to hear the full story. This Butterfly Bomb is painted yellow, which is the colour used for dropping on crops like corn and wheat.

Although Mile Ham Farm was predominately orchards, there were fields which prior (and after) to WW2, my Grandfather rented out for grazing and growing crops. These fields were also farmed by the Land Army during WW2.

Futhermore, Mile Ham Farm was then, and has historically been as it is today, surrounded by corn and wheat fields.

My mother does not know anything about the story behind this Butterfly Bomb Case because she wasn’t born until September 1938 so she has no recollection of the early years of WW2. Her only real memory of any bombing in the area in when a V1 “Doodlebug” landed in the adjacent corn field to the south-west, between the farm boundary and the railway line in the Autumn of 1944.

She remember this because it wasn't long after her sixth birthday and every pane of glass on the whole farm, farmhouse, barn, out-houses and greenhouses were blow-in.

The former Mile Ham Farm, was a 70 acre fruit farm which is now known as “Little Buds Farm” with the former Farmhouse and (now converted) Barn being separate properties. It is situated in the ME18 post code in Kent, between Paddock Wood and Yalding approximately 250 metres in an Easterly direction from Beltring Railway Station, along a road now called Gravely Ways.

My Grandfather had many dealings with the Military during WW2, including refusing to let them put a searchlight in his orchards, so if it was dealt with by the Military it could have been dealt with by the Bomb Disposal squads based at either Tunbridge Wells, Sevenoaks or Horsham.

It was given to me by my Grandfather on the day he sold-up, lock, stock and barrel by sale, when we walked together around the farm for the last time and to see how the saleeer’s had set everything out when he noticed a couple of items he didn’t want to sell, this was one of them, the other was his shotgun.

From 1970 it was stored in a plastic bag in a cardboard box in my parents attic until I helped my mother clear the house before she moved in 2001.

Since 2001 it has been stored in the same bag in a smaller box in my attic.

IT'S CONDITION IS REALLY VERY GOOD to EXELLENT CONSIDERING IT IS 70+ YEARS OLD BUT IT DIDSPEND IT'S FIRST30 YEARS IN A BARN AND THENTHE LAST 40+ YEARS INDOORS.

IT'S CONDITION IS ALSO QUITE REMARKABLE SINCE THE MOST COMMON WAY (APPARENTLY) TO DE-ACTIVATE THEM WAS TO BLOW THEM UP - THEREFORE IT IS ALSO QUITE RARE TO FIND ONE INTACT.

IT ALSO HAS NEVER BEEN CLEANED AND IS THEREFORE A BIT GRUBY BUT THIS IS JUST AN ACCUMULATION OF DUST AND DIRT FROM IT'S DAYS IN THE BARN.

MOST OF THE DIRT IS AROUND THE SRINGS WHICH SUGGESTS THAT IT HAS ADHEARED TO THE ORIGINAL GREASE APPLIED TO THE SPRINGS DURING MANUFACTURE IN GERMANY.

I CAN'T IMAGINE THAT MY GRANDFATHER WOULD HAVE GREASED OR OILED IT - THAT WOULD HAVE COST HIM MONEY ! - HE WAS NOTORIOUSLY "CAREFUL" WITH HIS MONEY.

THERE ARE ALSO SOME SCRATCHES AND SOME MINOR RUST BUT.....

***THE SPRINGS ARE STILL FULLY FUCTIONAL.

THEREFORE I WILL USE 2CABLE TIE'S (an extra onejust in case the first one breaks)TO SECURE IT TOGETHER WHEN POSTING.

***PLEASE REMEMBER THIS WHEN YOU WANT TO REMOVE THE CABLE TIE'S

***ALTHOUGH I CANNOT GUARANTEE THAT THEY ARE THE SAME TENSION AS WHEN IT WAS DROPPED FROM A GERMAN BOMBER DURING WW2.

SHIPPING NOTES;

UK MAINLAND DELIVERY OPTION 1 VIA ~ Royal Mail_Signed For 1st ClassTM

UK MAINLAND DELIVERY OPTION 2 VIA ~ Royal Mail_Special Delivery™ Guaranteed by 1pm

UK POSTAGE PRICE INCLUDES MAINLAND, HIGHLANDS & ISLANDS, NORTHERN IRELAND, ISLE of SCILLY, ISLE of MAN and the CHANNEL ISLANDS 

OVERSEAS DELIVERY VIA ~ Royal Mail AIRSURE (available countries ONLY) ORRoyal Mail “International Signed-For” Service. 

WILL SHIP WORLDWIDE.

IF YOUR COUNTRY IS NOT LISTED PLEASE MESSAGE ME FOR AN INDIVIDUAL SHIPPING QUOTE AT LEAST 72 HOURS BEFORE THE END OF THE sale.

~

More photos are available, please message me.

Any questions please also feel free to message me.

Please note, I am not available at my computer 24/7 - BUT I will respond asap.

Payment terms are PayPal.

Payment within 3 days of end of sale please.

Thanks for looking and Good Luck.

FOR YOUR FURTHER INFORMATION IF REQUIRED:

HISTORICAL INFORMATION

A Butterfly Bomb, or (Sprengbombe Dickwandig 2 kg or SD2) was a German 2 kilogram anti-personnel submunition used by the Luftwaffe during the Second World War. It was so named because the thin cylindrical metal outer shell which hinged open when the bomblet deployed gave it the superficial appearance of a large butterfly. The design was very distinctive and easy to recognise. SD2 bomblets were not dropped individually, but were packed into containers containing between 6 and 108 submunitions e.g. the AB 23 SD-2 and AB 250-3 submunitions dispensers. The SD2 submunitions were released after the container was released from the aircraft and had burst open. This bomb type was one of the first cluster bombs ever used in combat and it proved to be a highly effective weapon.The SD2 submunition was an 8 cm long cylinder of cast iron, which was slightly smaller in diameter before its vanes deployed. A steel cable 15 cm long was attached via a spindle to the fuze screwed into the fuze pocket in the side of the bomblet. The outer shell would hinge open as two half-cylinders when it was dropped and spring-loaded vanes at the ends would flip out. These rotated the spindle as the bomblet fell, arming the fuze. Butterfly bombs contained 225 grams of TNT. They were generally lethal to anyone within a radius of 25 metres and could inflict serious shrapnel injuries (e.g. penetrating eye wounds) as far away as 100 metres. Butterfly bombs were usually painted dark green. A dull yellow colour scheme was sometimes used, either for use in the middle east, or when dropped on grain crops at harvest time to kill farm-workers.Butterfly bombs could be fitted with any one of three fuzes:* 41 fuze - triggered detonation on impact with the ground
* 67 fuze - clockwork time delay adjustable between 5 and 30 minutes after impact
* 70 fuze - anti-handling device (i.e. boobytrap), triggering detonation if the bomb was moved after impact with the groundNote: butterfly bombs in a submunitions container could have the full range of fuzes fitted to increase disruption to the target. Fuze variants such as the 41A, 41B, 70B1, 70B2, etc., also existed. These variants were inserted into the fuze pocket via a bayonet fitting but were otherwise identical.On October 28, 1940 some butterfly bombs that had incompletely armed themselves were discovered in Ipswich by British ordnance technicians Sergeant Cann and 2nd Lieutenant Taylor. By screwing the arming rods back into the fuzes (i.e. the unarmed position) the two men were able to recover safe examples for scientific examination, in order to discover how the bombs functioned.As with more modern cluster bombs, it was not considered practical to defuze butterfly bombs which had fully armed themselves but failed to detonate (particularly those fitted with the type 70 fuze), due to the extreme risks involved. The standard render safe procedure for any unexploded butterfly bomb was to evacuate the area for at least 30 minutes (in case the bomblet was fitted with a type 67 time delay fuze), then destroy it in situ by detonating a small explosive charge next to it. Other solutions were to attach a long string to the bomb and tug on it after taking cover, or for bombs in open countryside, shooting at them with a rifle from a safe distance.Butterfly bombs were first used against Ipswich in 1940, but were also dropped on Grimsby and Cleethorpes in June 1943, amongst various other targets in the UK. They were subsequently used against Allied forces in the Middle East. The British Government deliberately suppressed news of the damage and disruption caused by butterfly bombs in order not to encourage the Germans to keep using them.The SD2 saw use in the opening stages of Operation Barbarossa, the German invasion of the Soviet Union, which began on 22 June 1941. Twenty to thirty aircrews had been picked to drop SD2s and SD10s (10 kg submunitions) on key Soviet airfields, a flight of three aircraft being assigned to each field. The purpose of these early attacks was to cause disruption and confusion as well as to preclude dispersion of Soviet planes until the main attack was launched.[1] It was reported that Kampfgeschwader 51 had lost 15 aircraft due to accidents with the SD2s, nearly half of the total Luftwaffe losses that day.[2]The last recorded death from a German butterfly bomb in England took place on November 27, 1956, over 11 years after the Second World War ended: Flight Lieutenant Herbert Denning of the RAF was examining an SD2 at the Upminster bomb cemetery, East of RAF Hornchurch, when it detonated. He died of shrapnel and blast injuries at Oldchurch Hospital the same day.

CONSTRUCTION: The body of the bomb is a cylindrical cast iron casing. A fuzing pocket is situated transversly in the side of the body. The SD 2A and SD 2 B differ only in the method in which the fuze is secured to the bomb. The fuze is threaded into the SD 2A while it is secured in the SD 2B by a bayonet joint and two U-shaped safety clips.
The bomb body is encased in thin sheet steel container made in four pieces--two end flaps and two pieces covering the sides of the bomb. These parts are hinged together, the hinges being mounted with torsion springs tending to force the parts of the wings away from the body, but are prevented from opening until a safety pin is pulled when container opens. After release, the wings because of there air drag, rise to the upper end of the 6-inch wire cable connected to the fuze. The rotation of the wings relative to the bomb body arms the fuze. When fuze (41) A is employed in the bomb, the wings consist of two triangular shaped flaps.
SUSPENSION: 23 bombs in the AB 23 SD 2 container; 108 bombs in the AB 250-3 container; 6 bombs in the Mark 500 Roden container; 24 bombs in the AB24t container.
COLOR AND MARKINGS: Body of bomb may be painted either black, lead-grey, red, yellow, or field grey. If the bomb is painted field grey it may have a 3/4-inch yellow band on the body, the wing assembly will be painted field be painted field grey with a yellow stripe on the inside and outside of the wings and may have a 3/4-inch red stripe at right angles to the to the yellow stripe on the wings. If the body is painted yellow, the wings will be painted yellow with a 3/4 inch strip of red on the wings. In addition to the specific color combination given, the wings may be field grey or unpainted.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF WW2 BOMB DISPOSAL.

The first authorised establishment for Bomb Disposal – Formation Order of May 1940 – created twenty five sections, each of a Lieutenant, a sergeant and fourteen other ranks….

By the end of June 1940 it came apparent that the twenty five B D sections already formed would in no way be able to cope with the expected deluge of bombs that would result from the withdrawal of our forces through Dunkirk and elsewhere….

In June 1940, just 20 unexploded bombs were dealt with.

This rose to 100 in July and up to 300 in August.

In the 287 days between 21st September 1940 and 5th July 1941, 24,108 bombs were made safe and removed….

October saw six companies formed on 2nd – No 8 at Cardiff under Capt J B James RE. No 14 at Leeds with Capt R C Bingham RE, No 15 at Boothtown, London with Capt A Cleghorn RE, No 16 under Major Windle RE at Cardiff, No 20 at Tunbridge Wells with Major N E Smith RE and No 21 at South Woodford with Major W R Seabrook RE. On 5th No 4 was formed at Cambridge under Capt Barefoot RE with No 19 under Major L P Hodgkinson RE at Bedford.

There were just two more companies formed in 1940. No 12 at Tunbridge Wells under Major S Lynn RE – By this time No 17 B D Coy had moved to Sevenoaks – No 22 at Brentford under Major M Durban RE.

1941 started with three companies being formed on 1st January….

Soon after it was decided that for greater efficiency, control and command, those companies which were covering a specific area together should form a ‘Group’. Probably the equivalent of a Regiment or Battalion in other branches of the Army….

No 2 B D Group covered South Eastern Command and was based at Tunbridge Wells. The C.R.E. was Lt Col S C Lynn RE with No 12 Coy at Horsham, Sussex, No 17 at Sevenoaks and No 20 also in Tunbridge Wells….

In 1942, Nos 8, 15 and 17 B D Companies joined the task force for the invasion of North Africa (Algeria).

In 1944 five B D Companies were allocated for the invasion of France. They were:- Nos 5, 19, 23, 24 and 25.

This left the organisation in the U.K. as thus:-

No 1 in Newcastle

No 2 in London

3 in Nottingham

No 4 in Bury St. Edmunds

No 6 in Wiltshire

No 7 in Bristol

No 9 in Birmingham

No 10 in Manchester

No 11 in Edinburgh

No 12 in Horsham

No 14 in Leeds

No 16 in Cardiff

No 20 in Sevenoaks

No 21 in London

No 22 in Colchester

No 27 in Northern Ireland.

 

On 08-Jul-13 at 23:43:02 BST, seller added the following information:

IMPORTANT NOTICE TO ALL OVERSEAS buyers AND *OFFSHORE UK buyers:

AS OF 23:30 8th July 2013 - THIS ITEM IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE FOR EXPORT FROM MAINLAND UK.

PLEASE NOTE THAT 'S SYSTEM IS CURRENTLY NOT ALLOWING ME TO REMOVE THE INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING OPTIONS FROM THIS LISTING.

IF AND WHEN IT DOES ALLOW, THEY WILL BE REMOVED.

UNTIL IT CAN BE REMOVEDI HAVE APPLIED THE "EXCLUDE POSTAGE LOCATION" OPTION TO ALL DESTINATIONS OTHER THAN MAINLAND UK.

I AM VERY SORRY ABOUT THIS PLEASE ACCEPT MY SINCEREST APPOLOGIES.

kxiv.

 

TO CLARIFY;

THIS ITEM IS NO LONGER AVAIALBLE FOR SHIPPING TO:

1, ALL NON UK DESTINATIONS.

2, ALL *OFFSHORE UK DESTINATIONS.

*THIS INCLUDES buyers FROM,

NORTHERN IRELAND

ALL SCOTTISH ISLANDS (including, HS - Outer Hebrides and the ZE - Lerwick/Shetland postcode areas)

ISLE OF WIGHT

ISLE of SCILLY

ISLE of MAN

THE CHANNEL ISLANDS

Many Thanks and again Very Sorry.


Ww2 German Luftwaffe Inert Sd2 A Butterfly Bomb *case Only

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Ww2 German Luftwaffe Inert Sd2 A Butterfly Bomb *case Only "uncleaned" Condition:
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