Ww1 Canadian Memorial Plaque Vimy Ridge First Day Casualty Lieutenant 78th Cef


Ww1 Canadian Memorial Plaque Vimy Ridge First Day Casualty Lieutenant 78th Cef

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Ww1 Canadian Memorial Plaque Vimy Ridge First Day Casualty Lieutenant 78th Cef:
$800


For your consideration we have on offer today:

First World War WW1 WWI Memorial Plaque or Death Penny, in the name of Rae Bryden McCarthy.McCarthy was originally from Barrie, Ontario. Son of Jeffrey A. and Isabel McCarthy, of Roxboro, Barrie, Ontario. More details below.

Plaque is mounted with loving remembrance in an oak frame as sold by the T. Eaton Company (Eaton's). Plaque rotates freely within frame mounting and is affixed to the frame by means of a screw and rivet, so I imagine that Eaton's must have soldered the screw directly to the back of the plaque. I have not take the plaque out of its frame.

Lieutenant (Lieut.) Rae Bryden McCarthy (often spelled Rae Brydon McCarthy), was originally enlisted in the 100th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (Winnipeg Grenadiers). His personnel records show that he was later transferred to the 78th Battalion CEF (the Winnipeg Grenadiers).

Lieutenant McCarthywas responsible for D Company of the 78th Winnipeg Grenadies when he was killed in action KIA, at the all too young age of 27, onApril 9, 1917 on the first day of the infamous battle at Vimy Ridge, France. This was the very first time that all units within the Canadian Corps fought alongside of one another and were also commanded by a Canadian. Thus marking what, for many, is considered one of the most historic days in Canadian history and attributed by many as the day that Canada as a nation was truly born. To this day, the site of the Vimy Ridge battle remains and is consecrated asCanadian soil, as gifted to Canada by France. The sight of the Vimy Monument is well known to countless Canadians. McCarthy is buried atGIVENCHY-EN-GOHELLE CANADIAN CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ. Cemetery/memorial reference: F. 26.

McCarthy's personnel records can be found online at the National Archives and Library site of Canada here: a wealth of detailed information on McCarthy, please visit the following is commemorated in multiple places, including the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce Building on Main Street in the Historic Exchange District in Winnipeg, Manitoba, on the Next of Kin Memorial Monument located at the corner of Broadway and Osborne Streets on the grounds of the Manitoba Legislative Assembly, he has write-ups in the memorial books published by the Bank of Commerce detailing some of his correspondence, as well as his biographical information, and he even has a street named after him in his hometown of Barrie, Ontario (McCarthy Court)! A soldier who was certainly given his fair due, for his remarkable service to his country.

His official entry in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Registry can be found online here: copy of the 78th Battalion (Winnipeg Grenadiers) CEF War Diary can be found here. action report for Vimy Ridge (April 9th, 1917) specifically lists McCarthy among the officers sent into that nation-making battle on the very first day. A day that will forever live in the annals of Canadian history as the day that Canada as a nation was truly born.

Please consult photographs provided for overall condition of this excellent plaque. The photos do constitute part of the description of this piece. Plaque is in immaculate condition.

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HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

The 78th Battalion (Winnipeg Grenadiers), CEF was an infantry battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force during the Great War. The 78th Battalion was authorized on 10 July 1915 and embarked for Great Britain on 20 May 1916. It disembarked in France on 13 August 1916, where it fought as part of the 12th Brigade, 4th Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the armistice. The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1920.

The 78th Battalion recruited in Winnipeg, Manitoba and the surrounding area and was mobilized at Winnipeg.

The 78th Battalion had three officers commanding:
Lt.-Col. J. Kirkcaldy, DSO, 22 May 1916 – 15 November 1917
Lt.-Col. J.N. Semmens 16 November 1917 – 19 March 1918
Lt.-Col. J. Kirkcaldy, CMG, DSO, 19 March 1918-Demobilization


Two members of the 78th Battalion were awarded the Victoria Cross. Lt. James Edward Tait was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 9 August 1918 during the Battle of Amiens. Lt. Samuel Lewis Honey was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 27 September 1918 during operations in the vicinity of Bourlon Wood. He had previously been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal and the Military Medal.

The 78th Battalion was awarded the following battle honours:
SOMME, 1916
Ancre Heights
Ancre, 1916
ARRAS, 1917, '18
Vimy, 1917
Ypres 1918
Drocourt-Quéant
HINDENBURG LINE
Canal du AND FLANDERS, 1916-18

The 78th Battalion, CEF is perpetuated by The Winnipeg Grenadiers, currently on the Supplementary Order of Battle.

The Battle of Vimy Ridge

was part of the Battle of Arras, in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region of France, during the First World War. The main combatants were the four divisions of the Canadian Corps in the First Army, against three divisions of the German 6th Army. The battle took place from 9 to 12 April 1917 at the beginning of the Battle of Arras, the first attack of the Nivelle Offensive, which was intended to attract German reserves from the French, before their attempt at a decisive offensive on the Aisne and the Chemin des Dames ridge further south.

The Canadian Corps was to capture the German-held high ground of Vimy Ridge, an escarpment on the northern flank of the Arras front. This would protect the First Army and the Third Army farther south from German enfilade fire. Supported by a creeping barrage, the Canadian Corps captured most of the ridge during the first day of the attack. The village of Thélus fell during the second day, as did the crest of the ridge, once the Canadian Corps overran a salient against considerable German resistance. The final objective, a fortified knoll located outside the village of Givenchy-en-Gohelle, fell to the Canadians on 12 April. The 6th Army then retreated to the Oppy–Méricourt line.

Historians attribute the success of the Canadian Corps to technical and tactical innovation, meticulous planning, powerful artillery support and extensive training, as well as the failure of the German 6th Army properly to apply the new German defensive doctrine. The battle was the first occasion when all four divisions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force fought together and it was made a symbol of Canadian national achievement and sacrifice. A 100-hectare (250-acre) portion of the former battleground serves as a memorial park and site of the Canadian National Vimy Memorial.

From the Find a Grave Website

His paternal Grandparents were William and Agnes McCarthy. Rae was born on April 6, 1890 in Barrie, Ontario, Canada. He was educated at the Barrie Collegiate Institute and began his career as a banker on 1st October, 1906.

Rae was one of four siblings which included:

Randal Kerr McCarthy
Ivan Agar McCarthy
Isabela Vera McCarthy Thompson

At the time of Rae's enlistment in December, 1915, he was living at 290 River Avenue, Winnipeg, Alberta and was working as a Banker at the Canadian Bank of Commerce. Banking was a profession that ran in the family. At this time he belonged to the 100th Winnipeg Grenadiers. In 1909 he served as Pte with the 24th Regt Kent Co in Ontario. Rae transfered to the 78th Canadian Battalion, 6th March, 1917. Rae was single with no dependents.

At the time of his death Rae was serving as Lieutenant of the 78th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment). April 9th 1917, Easter Monday morning, 5:30 am the Canadian's successful assault on the Germans began. The soldiers fought through driving winds, sleet and snow. The Canadian Corps of which Rae belonged attacked the Germans from positions south east of Souchez. Rae was initially listed as "missing in action" but the status changed to "killed in action"

Rae's brother Randal also served in the Great War. Randal also fought in the Vimy Ridge battle and sustained a gun shot wound in the right leg on March 1 1917, just weeks before Rae's death. The family had lost their father in 1912 which left their mother Isabel to carry this burden alone.

In a letter written by Rae on Wednesday November 8th 1916 he writes of his training in England:

"The course we are taking here is very comprehensive, including, as it does, lots of practical work, such as map-work, trench making, night attacks, etc., and we are given numerous lectures. There are about seventy of us here living in long, low buildings called 'huts.' They have electric light, hot and cold water, open fireplaces, etc., so we can hardly say we are roughing it. Imperial as well as Canadian officers are here, but in our hut we are nearly all Winnipegers, the 100th, 107th, 108th and 144th all being represented.

The mess is very formal at night—six or seven courses, each with a ten minutes', or so, interval. We come off very well, though, for we have five meals a day !—a bite and cup of tea before physical training, breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea and dinner. All the instructors have been in the present campaign and wear either the D.S.O. or M.C., or both.

We are less than thirty miles from London, so, naturally, we are able to go there quite often, especially as we have the week-ends to ourselves. London looks pretty dismal at night now, for they enforce the laws regarding lights. Still, with a little practice, it is fairly easy to find one's way around through the main parts. When you get into one of the theatres, restaurants or large hotels at night, it is hard to believe that there is a war on at all. Not having quite got over the habit of digging out financial facts, I learned that the Hotel Victoria, where I stayed on one visit, took in on the average £400 per day, while the Savoy on the day I was there took in £607 through its restaurant alone.

We see no signs of our going to France yet, but can expect such a move as soon as this course is over, I believe."

This notation was made in a letter by Lieutenant Andrew Harvie on Sunday April 15, 1917 regarding Rae:

"You will possibly have heard that Quinton and McCarthy were both transferred to this battalion with drafts of officers we received. Quinton is battalion bombing officer and - well, poor McCarthy went over in the battle and we have so far been unable to get any definite information about him. A rumour has gone around that he was wounded, but we cannot find which dressing station he passed through."

The capture of Vimy Ridge came with the cost of 3,598 dead out of 10,602 Canadian casualties. The Canadian success at Vimy marked a profound turning-point for the Allies. A year-and-a-half later, the Great War was over. The Canadian record, crowned by the achievements at Vimy, won for Canada a separate signature on the Versailles Peace Treaty ending the war. Back home, the victory at Vimy, won by troops from every part of the country, helped unite many Canadians in pride at the courage of their citizen-soldiers, and established a feeling of real nationhood.

Brigadier-General Alexander Ross had commanded the 28th (North-West) Battalion at Vimy said of the battle:

"It was Canada from the Atlantic to the Pacific on parade. I thought then . . . that in those few minutes I witnessed the birth of a nation."

Lieut McCarthy is buried along with two unknown Canadian soldiers. He is commemorated on Page 279 of the First World War Book of Remembrance. We thank you Lieut Rae McCarthy for what you gave for our country.


Ww1 Canadian Memorial Plaque Vimy Ridge First Day Casualty Lieutenant 78th Cef:
$800

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