Historic/vintage 6 Ft. 13-star American Flag Naval Ensign C.1876 19th C. Framed


Historic/vintage 6 Ft. 13-star American Flag Naval Ensign C.1876 19th C.  Framed

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Historic/vintage 6 Ft. 13-star American Flag Naval Ensign C.1876 19th C. Framed:
$10500.0


Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE Stunning 19th CenturyAMERICAN NAVAL ENSIGN Gig/Tender/Launch “Boat Flag”Federal Era Design/Post Civil WarHandmade (6 Foot) 13 STARS CIRCA 1876 (Federal Period 13 Star Flags were used well into 19th Century) Can Be Van Delivered East/West Coast/MidwestProbably Safest Optionor Crated (As Used on Launches, Gigs & Tenders)Professionally Framed/Professionally Conserved PROVENANCE: Captain Joseph Francis Provincetown, Massachusetts Circa 1876 13 star American national Flag, a Naval Ensign found in the former home of a Massachusetts ship captain by the name of Joseph Francis, a Portuguese immigrant who commanded a boat called the Correa. Francis owned a home at #66 Bradford Street in Provincetown. After purchasing the home from the Francis family, the new owner found the Flag in the attic during a renovation. Joseph Francis built the house in the 1850’s. The Flag itself is typical Naval Ensign flown on small US Navy boats of the period – gigs, tenders , launches – from late in the Civil War (Naval Regulations of 1864 specified such a Flag) through the 1880’s. Most US Navy small boat ensigns of this era measure six feet in length, like this example. The US Navy used the 13 star count on small boats, not only in the 18th century, but through most or all of the 19th century, particularly the second half, when there was greater consistency in military standards. The 13 star Flag was adopted for greater ease of recognition on smaller boats. At a distance, it is easier to discern a smaller number of large stars than it is to discern a large number of small stars. The canton and stripes of the Flag are made of wool bunting. There is an open sleeve made of heavy canvas, through which a hemp rope was inserted for hoisting. The stars are made of cotton and are double appliquéd and hand sewn with treadle sewn stripes. Note how the stars point in various directions on their vertical axis, which lends an interesting and folky visual element to the Flag’s design. The stars of this example are arranged in rows of 3 2 3 2 3 which can also be viewed as a diamond of stars with a star in each corner. Mounting: There was no expense spared in the conservation and display of this Flag. It has been museum mounted and hand-stitched to 100% silk organza for support on every seam and then stitched to a background of 100% cotton black twill, which was washed to with an acid free agent to reduce excess dye and set it. The fabric was heat-treated for the same purpose. It is archaically framed with UV protective Plexiglas and a gold leaf over Chinese red frame. Condition: There is minor foxing and staining, accompanied by moderate fabric loss throughout. Cotton of similar coloration was placed behind the stripes for masking purposes. Museum Collection of Naval Boat Flags 1861 - 1865 for ReferenceDuring the period of the U.S. sailing navy and the early steam-powered navy, nearly all ships possessed small boats, propelled by oars or small sails. These smaller craft permitted the transfer of personnel or small cargoes from ship to shore or ship to ship on the open sea. Like their mother ships, these gigs or small boats carried a stern staff for a small ensign. The small ensigns flown on these gigs were called Boat Flags by the U.S. Navy.When first employed, Boat Flags followed the same pattern and design as the current ensigns of the ship. Â However, as the number of states increased, so too did the number of stars on both the ensigns and the boat Flags. For the large ensigns, this posed little problem; the Flags were large enough that the stars were still visible. For the small boat Flags, however, the corresponding diminishing of the star size as the number of stars grew meant that the stars in the union tended to blur, affecting the appearance of the Flag. Eventually Boat Flags with a reduced star count were employed, at first unofficially and then by regulation.These Flags are highly prized because of their size. Most 19th century naval Flags were quite large, naval boat Flags provide a smaller alternative for both collectors and scholars alike. This Grouping presents example of these Flags bearing 16, 13 and 48 stars. The earliest examples from the 1850 contain 16 stars. The design was standardized to 13 star during the Civil War and both of the variant star field designs are presented here.Several late 19th century examples of 13 star Boat Flags are also presented. The full complement of 48 stars was restored to Boat Flags in 1916, and a yard-made example from 1919 concludes the Grouping. Naval Boat Flags, 1850-1919 Item NameSub-CollectionU.S. 16 Star Navy Boat Flag.Star Spangled Banner Flag House U.S. 16 Star Boat Ensign, Johnson Brothers, ME.U.S. 16 Star FlagsU.S. 13 Star Flag, 1850-1880.U.S. 13 Star Flags U.S. 13 Star Navy Boat Flag - W. Stokes Kirk.U.S. 13 Star Flags U.S. 13 Star Navy Boat Flag - Fort Fischer 1864.Crow Art Partnership Collection U.S. 13 Star Boat Flag - "The Old Flag of the War"Mastai - Early American Flags U.S. Navy Boat Flag - Battery Wagner Assault 1863.U.S. NavalU.S. 13-Star Flag, Navy Boat Flag.Star Spangled Banner Flag House U.S. 13 Star Navy Boat Flag No.14.Mastai - Early American Flags U.S. 13 Star Flag - John B. BatchelderU.S. 13 Star Flags U.S. 13 Star Boat Flag.Judge John T. Ball courtroom & chambers Flag collection U.S. 13 Star Flag, 3-2-3-2-3 Pattern.Mastai - Early American Flags U.S. 13 Star, 13 Stripe Navy Boat Flag No. 7.Mastai - Early American Flags U.S. 48 Star Flag - USN Boat Flag MI Size 12.U.S. Naval Boat Flags of the U.S. Navy 1782 - 1919 BOAT FlagS OF THE U.S. NAVY1782 - 1919 13 Star U.S. Boat Flag from the revolutionary privateer Minerva, 1782. The 4-5-4 horizontal star pattern is the oldest pattern found on U.S. Flags and would reappear in the decades between the 1850s and the 1870s. 20 Star U.S. 5-5-5-5 Navy Boat Flag. Third official U.S. Flag, which confirms to the circular issued by the U.S. Navy in September of 1818 following the recommendation of President James Monroe, from the Mastai Collection, 1818 -1819. 20 Star U.S. 5-5-5-5 Navy Boat Flag. Marked “6 ft En- sign,” a typical naval method of titling Flags and conforms to known sizes used by the U.S. Navy, from the Flayderman Collection, 1818 - 1819. 26 Star U.S. Boat Flag. In the first half of the 19th century U.S. Navy Boat Flags generally bore the full compliment of stars as in this 26 star example. Experts speculate that due to the striking rows of stars and the size, this might be a U.S. Navy Boat Flag. 31 star U.S. Boat Flag. This Flag bears a striking resemblance to a 31 star Boat Flag, with a reversed canton that accompanied Commodore Oliver Hazard Parry to Japan in 1853. Posteriorly this Flag would be displayed during the 1861 Pratt St, Riots in Baltimore. 16 Star U.S. 4-4-4-4 Navy Boat Flag - Navy Yard Charleston. This Flag is marked with both its size and place of man- ufacture, “6 Ft. BOAT ENSIGN” and “N Y C,” a prime example of a Navy Yard made Flag. From the collections of the Star Spangled Banner Flag House and Museum, 1850s. 16 Star U.S. 4-4-4-4 Boat Flag - Johnson Bros. Bath Maine. This Flag is marked “(U.S.) Ensign from Johnson Bros: Bath, Maine” a firm that has it origins in the 1840s. The size suggests that this is a civilian Boat Flag, mimicking ZFC0029, 1850s. 13 Star U.S. Navy 4-5-4 Navy 6 foot Boat Flag, from Commodore Stephen Decatur, preserved by his wife. Anna Rowell Philbrick Decatur, and is marked accordingly, 1850s or 1860s. 13 Star 4-5-4 hand sewn cotton civilian Boat Flag. This Flag is very similar in size to U.S. Navy Size Number 10, but likely a civilian copy, 1850s to 1860s. 13 Star U.S. 3-2-3-2-3 Navy Boat Flag, “The Old Flag of the War 1861-1865.” This #12 Contract wool Boat Flag vessel is unknown; Flag conforms to the new style introduced in the 1860s. 13 Star U.S. 3-2-3-2-3 #12 Navy Boat Flag. This Flag was captured by Captain Charles E. Chichester, commander of a battery of Confederate artillery that Union troops unsuccessfully attacked on July 11, 1863 (a week before the doomed assault dramatized in the film “Glory”). 13 Star U.S. 3-2-3-2-3, #11 Boat Flag - Captain Stephen Decatur. This is an American Civil War era U.S. Navy Boat Ensign. The name ARP DECATUR is inscribed in period ink on the hoist, referring to Anna Rowell Philbrick Decatur, the wife of Commodore Stephen Decatur. 13 star U.S. 4-5-4, #12 Navy Boat Flag used at the amphibious landings at Ft. Fisher, North Carolina, Jan 1865 This Flag was used on one of the small boats of Rear Admiral David Dixon Porter’s fleet when it attempted to capture Fort Fischer, a powerful bastion protecting the Confederacy’s last open port, located in Wilmington, NC. 13 star U.S. 3-2-3-2-3 Boat Flag, very similar in size to a U.S. Navy Size Number 12, this Flag was from the courtroom display collection of Superior Court Judge John T. Ball, of Santa Clara County, California, 1860s to 1870s. 13 Star U.S. 3-2-3-2-3 #11 Navy Boat Flag, this sewn wool Flag was acquired from the descendants of W. Stokes Kirk, a Philadelphia, PA dealer in Civil War surplus. 1860s. 13 Star U.S 3-2-3-2-3, printed, #14 Navy Boat Flag, manufactured by United States Bunting Co. of Lowell, Massachu- setts. By former General Benjamin Butler in the late 1860s or early 1870s. 13 Star U.S 3-2-3-2-3, printed, #14 Navy Boat Flag, manufactured with Holt’s patented resist dye process by United States Bunting Co. of Lowell, Massachusetts. by former General Benjamin Butler in the late 1860s or early 1870s. From the Star Spangled Banner Flag House and Museum Collection. 13 Star U.S 3-2-3-2-3, printed, #14 Navy Boat Flag, manufactured with Holt’s resist dye process by United States Bunting Co. of Lowell, Massachusetts. by former General Benjamin Butler in the late 1860s or early 1870s. From the personal collection of Gettysburg historian John Badger Batchelder, late 1860s through the 1880s. 13 Star U.S 3-2-3-2-3, sewn, #8 Navy Boat Flag, from the late 19th century. Note the vertical 3 up and 2 down rows which were a feature of Flags made between 1882 and 1899. 13 Star U.S. 3-2-3-2-3, sewn, #7 Navy Boat Flag, manufactured by Navy Yard N.Y. in Brooklyn in April 1891. 13 Star U.S 3-2-3-2-3, sewn, #11 Navy Boat Flag, manufactured by Navy Yard, New York in Brooklyn, from the Decatur Family Collection, 1910 to 1915. 48 Star U.S 8-8-8-8-8-8, sewn, #12 Navy Boat Flag, manufactured by Navy Yard at Mare Island, California, after the 13 star US Navy Boat Flag was abolished in 1916. This Flag is dated 1919.

Historic/vintage 6 Ft. 13-star American Flag Naval Ensign C.1876 19th C. Framed:
$10500.0

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